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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, July 05, 1953, Image 116

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1. To moke an ice cream soda, put sirup or fruit in to a tall glass, then stir in a spoonful of ice cream.
Ice Cream Sodas At Home
By Violet Faulkner
Food Editor
>
MORE THAN three cen
turies ago, a French
chef in the household of
Charles I of England con
cocted a frozen dessert. The
king was so pleased with this
culinary masterpiece he sum
moned the chef and promised
him a yearly pension if he
would hold the recipe forever
a secret. But whether some
one else offered him a more
substantial bribe or a gossipy
cook couldn’t keep a good
thing to himself, the secret
leaked out.
The first appearance of ice
cream in America is recorded
in some old letters written
in 1700 by a guest of Gov.
Bladen of Maryland who said:
“Among the Rarities of which
it was Compos’d, was some
fine Ice Cream which, with
the Strawberries and Milk,
eat Most Deliciously.”
The ice cream soda has
become an American institu
tion. It’s a soda fountain
treat easily duplicated at
home. First, you need tall
glasses, straws, and long
handled spoons to make it
fun. To make a soda that is
as bubbly and frothy as the
best, the ingredients should
include well-chilled spark
ling water or carbonated bev
erages of your choice, a
variety of flavors and fruits
and, of course, plenty of Ice
cream.
Here are some favorites for
you to try:
Black and White Soda
Three tablespoons choco
late sirup, 1 spoonful ice
cream, carbonated water, 1
or 2 scoops vanilla ice cream.
Pour sirup into glass, then
add a spoonful of ice cream
and blend into sirup. Slowly
fill glass 3 4 full with chilled
carbonated beverage, add ice
cream. If glass is not full,
add more carbonated bever
age to fill to the top. Serves
one.
Brown Cow
One quart root beer. \a cup
milk, 1 pint chocolate ice
cream.
Chill 4 glasses. Pour 2
tablespoons root beer and 1
tablespoon milk into each
glass. Blend well and add 2
scoops ice cream. Fill glasses
to top with remaining root
beer, stir. Garnish with a
few chocolate sprinkles, if
desired. Serves four.
Strawberry Soda
Two tablespoons ' frozen
strawberries ( def rosted), 2
tablespoons ice cream, car
bonated water, 1 or 2 scoops
strawberry ice cream.
Pour fruit, then ice cream
into a chilled glass and stir
to mix. Fill glass % full with
chilled carbonated beverage,
add 1 or 2 scoops ice cream,
then more carbonated bever
age to fill to the top. Serves
one.
. Coffee Soda
One and one-half table
spoons instant coffee, ‘2 cup
granulated sugar, 2 cups
water, coffee or vanilla ice
cream and chilled sparkling
water.
Boil together for 5 minutes
the instant coffee, sugar and
water. Chill. In 4 tall glasses,
place 1 or 2 scoops ice cream.
Pour on Va coffee sirup, fill
each glass to top with spar
kling water. Serves four.
Peach Frost
Sugar, % cup sliced peaches
(or use defrosted frozen
peaches and omit sugar*,
vanilla ice cream, ginger ale.
Mash the peaches with a
fork and add sugar to taste.
Place in 6 chilled glasses
and add 1 or 2 scoops ice
cream. Fill glasses to top with
ginger ale. Serves six.
2. Add carbonated beverage until glass is three-quarters full
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3. Float on mixture two scoops of ice cream and more beverage
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4. On your marks, men! Chocolate, cherry, strawberry, pineapple?
THE WASHINGTON STAR PICTORIAt MAGAZINE, JUIY 5, 1953—1
PAGE 19

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