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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, October 21, 1953, Image 36

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1953-10-21/ed-1/seq-36/

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A-36
THE EVENING STAR
Washington, D. C.
WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 21, 19BS
Contract Bridge
By Easley Blackwood
It is hard to find any fault
with the holding of a hand like
Mr. Abel’s. However, when
practically all of a partnership’s
strength is concentrated in one
hand, a serious entry problem
Is often present.
North dealer, neither side vul
nerable.
NORTH.
(Mr. Champion)
+ 72
10985
0 Q J 10-8 3
+ 72
WEST EAST
(Mrs. Keen) (Mr. Meek)
+ 1096 + KJB4
S>J 7 6 2 VA
0542 0976
+ QlO 5 +J9863
SOUTH.
• Mr. Abel)
+ AQ53*
VKQ43
OAK
+A K 4
The bidding:
North. East. South. West.
Pass Pass 3NT All pass
When this is the case, declarer
must be alert to the necessity
of making out of the ordinary
plays which will enable him to
reach the weak hand.
In today’s deal Mrs. Keen
opened the deuce of hearts
against the three no-trump con
tract. Mr. Meek won with the
ace and Mr. Abel dropped the
trey. The six of clubs was re
turned and Mr. Abel decided to
duck. Mrs. Keen won with the
ten and returned the queen.
The king w'on and Mr. Abel
cashed the ace and king of dia
monds. He next cashed the king
of hearts and looked vainly for
the jack to drop. When Mr.
Meek showed out on the second
heart lead, discarding the nine
of diamonds, it was clear that
the ten of hearts would never
be an entry to the board.
Mr. Abel now laid down the
ace of clubs, stripping Mrs. Keen
of that suit, and followed with
the queen and another heart.
Mrs. Keen was in on the last
heart lead and her return was
the ten of spades. Although this
gave Mr. Abel two spade tricks,
he still had only eight tricks
in all.
‘ Beautiful end-play for down
one.” said Mr. Champion sar
castically. ‘‘Anybody could enter
my hand if I had an ace. I
had an entry just as good as an
ace. but it took a little thinking
to see it.
‘‘All you had to do was drop j
your queen of hearts under the j
ace at the first trick. That j
would leave you with two hearts ;
smaller than my ten spot and
nothing could have prevented
you from reaching the board to
cash all of the diamonds.”
This analysis was correct. But
it isn’t the "normal” play to j
drop a queen under an adverse
ace when you can play the lowly j
trey.
(Copyright, 1953. General Features Carp.) <
Word Game
Find 43 or more words in
ALTERED,
meaning, "changed, modified.”
Average is 39; time limit, 30
minutes.
Rules of the game—l. Words must be
of four or more letters. 2. Words which
acquire four letters by the addition of
*‘s. such as “bats,” “cats,” are not
used. 3. Only one form of a word Is
used. 4. Proper names are not used.
Answer ot OBERVERS.
obese, observe, obverse, over, beer, bores,
boss, seer. sere, severs, serves, sober,
sore, ever, erose. robes, roses, roves,
verse, veer, verbose, verbs.
Famous Fables
By E. E. Edgar
NAME:—Some years ago,
novelist Louis Bromfield
went to Hollywood to work
for producer Samuel Gold
wyn. He was set up in a
sumptuous office, had a lim
ousine at his disposal and
was paid a fabulous salary.
But he was given no assign
ment.
For two weeks he did
nothing but draw his pay.
At the end of that time, he
decided that he had had
enough and he went to see
the producer.
"Look here, Mr. Goldwyn,”
he said with some heat, "I’ve
been here two weeks at a big I
salary and I haven't done a
thing to earn my keep. Let’s j
put an end to this farce.
Either give me something to
do or let me out of my con
tract.”
Goldwyn stepped from be
hind his desk and put his
arm around the writer.
“Come, come, don’t let it
get you down,” he said con
solingly. “We’ll find some
thing for you soon. Until
then, I'm more than happy
to pay your salary. After all,
I hired you for your name,
Mr. Bromberg.”
PROOF:—A young com
poser of dubious talent once
set a Schiller poem to music
and brought his brainchild
to composer Johannes \
Brahms. The latter listened
with obvious distaste to the
second-rate composition.
"You have made a great
contribution to the arts.” he
said, when the young com
poser had finished.
"Thank you!” gasped the
other in delight. “You really
mean it?”
“Yes,” replied Brahms.
"You have proved beyond
doubt that Schiller’s poetry
is Indestructible.”
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jfffl HEHOfPFTt ■ ViAitfT*** nmv **W^!
r Aaa/r?iosrr
3>. REMEMBER, I SAN/ ¥~~ L TO HER— OH K/SLLrI GUESS 4
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CLEAR IVE SOT A HBGO STORY ABOUT BO
NW/SRPe ASAIMST SEARCHING FOR JUNIOR, HT
BOANDTRIX—IT> MYCNMMERS BBSAN TO \
► LKETO SCJ9ATCH TALK ABOUT OITCWNS ME )
7?4S#AIC& Or* tVS GAF&- * AND EETTINS A DOG! J
TSBX 13 , S /vows ASK YOU/ J I
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CROSS-WORD PUZZLE
S H AlDj A| P|e| |s|t|e|ml
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THOROUGHBREDS
IS|O|R|EI Itielel laluelc
(Answer to Yesterday’s Puzzle.)
HORIZONTAL
1 Hawaiian
wreath
4 Precipitous
9 Operated
12 Kind of
tree
13 From this
time
14 Before
15 Faucet
16 Deep collar
worn by
Pope
17 Animal’s
foot
18 Holland
commune
20 Pertaining
to the cheek
22 Withered
24 To fondle
25 Remainder
28 Cereal
grain
29 To be ill
30 State of
Brazil
31 Bland
33 Jury
34 Join
35 Pikelike
fish
36 A blow on
the head
38 River of
Germany
39 To deposit
40 South
African fox
41 Flower
43 Fourth
calif
44 Sphere
46 Jewish
expounder
of law
48 Marsh
51 Swordsman’s
dummy stake
52 Small body
of land
53 City in
New Guinea
54 French for
summer
55 Part of
hammer (pi.)
56 A newt
VERTICAL
1 To allow
2 Syllable of
scale
3 That cannot
be disturbed
4 Foot cover
ing
5 Pronoun
6 Glossy
coating
I E p p [3 IS p [§ 15 [To [TI
12 13 14
51 16 U
18 55 Ti
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34 33 31
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I I 11l I Mill
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H W 575« GEORGIA AVE. N.W W-f
= Washington's • Complete Kosher. Market -y*
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1 CHICKENS •SSSf lb ~ |
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=1 BUMBLE BEE OR CHICKEN OF THE SEA ~ ~~ ~ HI
S SITE SIZE OR CHUNK £% o'/2 OZ. «•« Hf
■ WHITE MEAT THU* J "-Hi
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m WISCONSIN EXTRA FANCY GRADE "A" y, Ag* H
1 SWISS CHEESE 0 ?™« '» 33 i
lg FRESH NEW YORK SMOKED pm. m
1 WHITE FISH n>- 79 ■
1 LIBBY'S TOMATO JUICE 4 ‘" 25'
■ STEEL WOOL PADS 33c *
Wm ROKEACH KOSHER SOAP 2 Ige. bars 25c m
I FRESH FROM OUR OWN OVENS
FRENCH STREOSEL TOPPED AQc ■
COFFEE CAKE i
23 Artist’s
stand
24 Kind of
pastry
26 Fodder
storage
pits
27 Symbol for
tantalum
29 Hail
30 To prohibit
32 Matures
33 To recom
pense
34 Pronoun
35 Mangle
37 Exist
39 To rent
40 Indian
mulberry
42 Journey
43 River
islands
44 To unclose
45 To soak
47 Man’s
nickname
49 Simpleton
I 50 Obtain
7 Ostentation
8 Spool
9 Blamable*
10 Macaw
11 Recent
19 Prefix:
Down
21 Islands in
Galway Bay
22 Therefore i
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I IONS AS He SAP WHAT HB 7WO#CAN'PAP- (. TALKER AT THAT, THOUPAN' OF / AUF ~~ WHEN / THIS'LL TYK& A PIT. \ PARPON Me ~
W 9AIP 1 POYS'AUPAAir) 1?866ie V ) AU.'S SAIP AN' f WE WERE APOUT TO IPARDON MB -
lw— 50...h0w you broach th- amperwParpon me
|k about JggpJ wHATAiour b owin'. jiSlflfiPOFFer ] , mum.- tba? os a j fopes >
MARLIN KEEL sTremember,sam.. our sonTI I ©mile out at sea77~HHB
/ MARV; IF THE PAPEE6 VO PRINT \ MARLIN l€> WITH THE mtr — : ,N THE B> lLj S e FORWARD...I
P THE RHINE&' IDIOTIC ) PROFEOOOR f I PRAy SHE'S HANDLING SWEEtJ
J^uSa2jn ES | MISS JONES... I WANTED TO DO RESEARCH- I'M NUTS ABOUT )11 I - HEY// WHAT BROUGHT ON THERE'S '
Xp- • Xpi PN'T SWEAT FPR OUT ALL ABOUT AND WHY THIS SO&sfi AUTOBIOSEAPHCAL \ NOTHINKS
/ NINE YEARS, PRJNKINS IN THE THEV SO AROUNP /WAKIN® PERFECTLY NICE ) I BINGE? MUST BE THE LOOK OF TO
f SWEET NECTAR OF PUCE SCIENCE, I (Kfi IvJgjWW PEOPLE SICK,.. BUT I HAVE A MOTHER ANP J WARM INTEREST IN YOU? FACE' / FORGIVE
KERRY B.AK,— —— . .—.
NO,NO,MR.Q.A./.. BETTER SENP HW OVER \ I’LL PO\ OKAY'OU TIMTHC jpassn I MctEß =• I - I
. A BUM,T4NKEP UP ON TO CITY HOSPITAL.. TO J THAT, j 4LLEY W/TH HlfA 1 ? W WEztv*st~\ —Ti "
CISCO KID 17
= / OKO WAS SHOT.' SO SEE IF VOIPS?
A f ]a j _ / l CAN HELP HIM, PANCHO. 1 I'LL^/S
4# f_ / Of F THESE HOMBRES^jg
. OHNNY HAZARD— ONE TENTH// Y then keep it, yourself/ NVj am the only man in France \
/ OUITE SO, > 4 B-BUT...THAT ISN'T PEPPLE IT FOR A PITTANCE WHO CAN SMUGGLE PEARLS OUT OF
you REALIZE, M. POINTE, >( MY PEAR FAIR... STO A-FENCE* WHO WON'T THE COUNTRY WITHIN TWENTY-FOUR
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r\ swed 0N
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•\J7 ra OUARANTEEO
McCRORY’S
li I lOr STORE
•HOE REFAIR DEFT.
Til I Ert N.W.
Uncle Ray's Comer
Dallas—This big Texas city
has a history which goes back
to the time of the Lone Star Re
public. A few years after the
Texans declared their indepen
dence from Mexico, John N.
Bryan moved here from Ar
kansas. Bryan was a native of
Tennessee, and had spent a good
deal of his time wandering from
place to place.
When Bryan built a cabin on
the bank of the Trinity River,
he was 30 years old. He be
lieved that he had found a good
spot for a settlement, and coaxed
some of his friends to join him.
Among the settlers were mem
bers of the Beeman family.
Margaret Beeman, one of the
10 children in her household, was
married to Bryan after her 18th
»* - i.
The Texas state flag, shown
here with its single star, carries
memories of the Lone Star Re
public.
birthday. In later years, she
WTote:
“We lived happidly in a lonely
log hut, with buffalo, deer and
turkey for meat and wild honey
for sweets. We ground our meal
on a steel mill and raised the
corn on the ground where your
fine courthouse stands. We had
an Indian pony and a wood plow
. . . and harness made from
buffalo skins. We crossed the
river in our little canoe dug out
of a cottonwood tree.”
Fourteen more settlers arrived
within a few months after the
marriage of Bryan. With them
they brought 100 head of cattle,
also a wagon loaded with corn.
One of the new settlers made a
survey of the site of the town,
which then had an area of
hardly half a square mile.
The first name of the settle
ment was Peters’ Colony, and
was given in honor of W. S.
Peters of Louisville. Ky. Peters
was the head of a group of men
who had been granted most of
By Ramon Coffman
the land in Dallas County.
We know that the residents
began to call their Tillage Dallas
within two years after Bryan
moved to the spot, but there is
doubt as to which “man named
Dallas” was honored. A case
has been made in favor of
Joseph Dallas, an Arkansas
friend of Bryan who settled
him, on land inside the present
city of Dallas. The more com
mon view is that the name was
meant to honor a Philadelphia
man, George M. Dallas, who ba«
came the American vice presi
dent under Polk.
If you want a free copy of
the illustrated leaflet. YOUR
BODY AT WORK, send a self
addressed, stamped envelope to
Uncle Ray in care of The Star.

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