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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, July 03, 1954, Image 5

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Constantine Brown —
Will Senate Back Knowland?
Informal Poll Shows 60 Favoring United Nations Secession
If Red China Enters; American People Believed Behind Move
Bipartisanship on foreign
affairs was illustrated once
more in the Senate last Thurs
day. Republican Majority
Leader William Knowland and
Pat McCarran, veteran Nevada
Democrat, proposed within a
few-hours interval and without
preliminary agreement that
the United States withdraw
from the United Nations in
the event Communist China is
permitted to supplant the .
Nationalist government in that
organization of “peace-loving
nations.”
There is no doubt that the
warning shots fired by the two
Senators will have powerful
reverberations across both
oceans. But it is doubtful that
they will affect the decisions
already taken by most of our.
allies and friends abroad.
They are, with few exceptions,
bent on appeasing Red China
and the U.S.S.R. in the fool
ish expectation that appease
ment will bring peace and co
existence with the Communists.
An informal poll in the
cloakrooms late Thursday aft
ernoon showed that a sub
stantial number of Republi
cans and Democrats favor the
breaking of ties with the
United Nations if the scheme
to give the Nationalist seat to
the Peiping Reds succeeds.
The poll showed upward of 60
solons favorable to a “seces
sion.”
The Knowland warning that
he would resign his position
as majority leader to "take the
fight to the country without
embarrassing in any way the
administration” and the Mc-
Carran resolution to “author
ize and direct the President”
to notify the United Nations
that the membership of the
United States in that organ
isation is abrogated in the
event Red China is admitted
do not reflect any isolationist
tendencies. Neither are they
Lowell Mellett —
Knowland Would Destroy U. N.
Old-Timer Thinks He's Out to Do for United Nations
What Lodge and Others Did for League of Nations
“When In the course of hu
man events. It becomes neces
sary for one people to dissolve
the political bands that have
connected them with ‘an
other—”
"What are you doing, Old-
Timer; tuning up tpr a Fourth
of July speech?”
"Nope, just thinking how
Senator Knowland might have
I written his declaration of in
dependence—his independence
of the President and the Sec
retary of State and the Sen
ate and. above all. of the a
United Nations.”
“You mean his statement of
what hell do when and if Red
China is' admitted to the
United Nations?”
"Yes. Knowland believes
that a decent respect for the
opinion of mankind requires
that he should declare the
causes which impel him to the
separation. When, as and if, of
course. Matter of fact, he is
being fairer about it than
Jefferson and the rest were
when they wrote their Decla
ration of Independence. He’s
- <0
Rescuers Comb Ruins
Os Philippine Cities
For Quake Victims
By th» Associated Pros!
MANILA, July 3. Rescue
squads dug through the rubble of
two earthquake-wrecked cities
for dead and injured today as
lighter but sharp aftershocks
spread fresh terror through the
central Philippines.
Broken communications made
It impossible to get an accurate
picture of casualties and prop
erty damage in the Southern
Luzon area where yesterday’s
quake created havoc.
Latest reliable figures showed
12 known dead, 4 missing. 24
seriously injured and 100 treated
for minor injuries.
Earlier police reports said 20
were believed killed at the pro
vincial capital of Sorsogon, a
city of 26,000 which apparently
bore the brunt of the shock.
The constabulary said eight
were known dead in Sorsogon
and four at Bacon, a seaport of
23.000 on the east coast which
also was wrecked.
More than 40 aftershocks were
recorded at Sorsogon Friday
night and Saturday morning.
Many of the injured reportedly
refused to enter the hospital and
were treated on the lawn.
Thousands of Filipinos slept in
the streets and, fields Friday
night for fear a new quake would
destroy their homes.
Three Killed, Seven Hurt
As Tree Crushes Truck
By tfw Associated Pros*
CHATTANOOGA. Tenn., July
3—A windstorm toppled a huge
oak tree across a truck loaded
with 13 men yesterday, killing
thres persons and injuring seven.
Cloys D. Lay was driving the
TV A, truck in a windstorm near
Fort Oglethorpe. Ga., when the
accident occurred. He said:
*1 could see the trees alongside
the road bending in the wind,
but had no thought that there
. was any dahger. All of a sudden
\ that big tree came crashing
across us, through the canvas
(covered section just back of the
Irab.”
A power saw was used to help
out through to the men, who had
been erecting a steel tower
nearby.
The tree was about I feet In
intended to show any hostility
to that International organiza
tion.
America has been probably
the most ardent supporter of
the U. N. In no other part
of the world are* there so
many organizations and pri
vate groups rooting and prop
agandizing for that so-called
peace organization. This coun
try has made more sacrifices
and efforts to maintain the
principles of that institution as
provided in the charter. The
160,000 American casualties in
Korea and the sls billion spent
in that campaign, compared to
negligible losses suffered by
our Western European allies,
bear witness to our honesty of
purpose.
After a phony armistice was
signed in Korea and "Moscow
and Peiping had ordered and
assisted the Viet Minh to-re
new their aggression in Indo
china, this country was still
willing to make further sac
rifices to curb aggression and
uphold the fundamental prin
ciples of the U. N.
It is France which opposed
bitterly the bringing of the
Indo-China aggression before
the U.N. lest the world gain
the impression that she was
losing control over her Asiatic
colonial empire. But after
things really turned sour for
the French our Government
did everything in its power to
get as many “peace loving”
countries as wished to join us
to stop the Communists in
their tracks. Secretary Dulles
was politely but firmly re
buffed.
The suggestion of our West
ern European friends to sup
plant the idealism provided in
the U.N. charter by political
opportunism does not appeal to
the American supporters of the. ...
U. N. If we were to subscribe
to the point of view of those
members of the U. N. to shut
telling in advance what he’ll
do. He’ll not only secede per
sonally from the United Na
tions, but he’ll devote his ef
forts to persuading the coun
try to follow him. And that
isn’t all. He’ll resign the Re
publican leadership of the
Senate. There’s a threat to
make the Nation shudder!
What will the Senate do with
out the leadership of the Sen
ator from Formosa?”
“You don’t seem to take Mr.
Knowland very seriously.”
“Well, he takes himself seri
ously enough for both of us.
However, I can co-exist peace
fully with him. whether he can
with Eisenhower and Dulles or
not. I find it a little harder to
co-exist with the notion that
his friend Chiang is the gov
ernment of China when the
whole world knows he is not.
Likewise with the notion that
we have to love and approve
every government that’s in the
United Nations. If that were
the case we should be getting
out, regardless of China. We
certainly have no love for the
Fletcher Knebel-
Potomac Fever
The Senate okays Ike’s bill lowering taxes. This administra
tion is a big improvement. The Democrats used to spend more
than they took in—whereas Ike takes in less than he spends.
** * *
Listening to the House debate the farm program, you’d think
the farmer was a fellow who lived in a polling booth and dashed
out of the ballot box only long enough to get a Government
loan on it.
• * • e
v Anti-Red forces form-a new government in Guatemala.
That Guatemala war is the kind the world needs more of—the
kind that ends the minute the shooting starts.
. * * * *
* Sepate Democratic Leader Johnson joins Republican Leader
Knowland in threatening to quit the United Nations. We can
be thankful of one thing. Our problems may be multiplying—
but so are our Secretaries of State.
* • • •
A British airliner spots a “flying jellyfish” off Labrador.
No cause for alarm. Almost anywhere you go these days, you’re
liable to rim into Great Britain’s foreign policy.
* ♦ * *
Civil defense headquarters plans to move to the health
center of Battle Creek, Mich. Thefe’s some doubt this Is for
the recuperation of civil defense—or Michigan’s G.O.P. Senate
Candidate Homer Ferguspn.
** * •
Senators call for a “reappraisal” of our foreign policy.
American foreign policy has always had but a single goal—to
find out what American foreign policy is.
Maud Lynch, Dallas Dry Era
Underworld Queen, Dies Broke
By tha Associated Press
DALLAS, July 3.—Maud
Lynch, queen of the Dallas
underworld and pickpocket de
luxe back in prohibition days,
is dead.
Maud died last night 15 min
utes after she reached a hos
pital after she had been found
ill and half-paralysed in a walk
up hotel. Sh*> was 56. broke and
alone. Doctors said she ap
parently had suffered a stroke.
Maud’s trademarks were swank
Mack limousines and white furs
back in Texas’ roaring twenties
and early thirties. She amassed
a fortune, police and newspaper
men said, as a prostitute, shop
lifter and pickpocket.
diameter at the base and was
from 60 to 70 feet tall. The
wind cracked and twisted it off
about 13 feet above the ground.
The dead are Obadiah Crab
tree, 30, Jamestown, Tenn.; Or
ville C. Belk, 27, Jasper, Tenn.,
and Charles Hayden Anderson
45, Sweetwater, Tenn.
our eyes to the misdeeds of the
Red Chinese and appease them
by opening the doors of the
U.N. then that organization
must suffer the fate of the
late League of Nations.
. It is said that during the
recent Washington calks w'th
Winston Churchill some of the
British delegates were re
minded that Red China* still
stands branded as an aggres
sor by the United Nasons. The
reply was that the matter could
be easily taken care of by re
scinding that “offensive" reso
lution.
The United Nations, thanks
to the presence of the Musco
vites, their satellites and their
fellow travellers, such as India*
has been a disappointment to
most Americans. But few
voices have been raised in the
past demanding America’s
withdrawal from what obvi
ously has become a futile de
bating society serving prin
cipally as a sounding board
for the Red propagandists.
But when the Western na
tions and their friends in Asia
served us an unofficial notice
that they intended to ram
down our throats Communist
China, which at this very mo
ment continues to be an ag
gressor, it was too much for
the Senate, which has an im
portant role in thd conduct of
our foreign affairs.
The Knowland and McCar
ran proposal must not be con
strued by any stretch of imag
ination as an empty gesture
or playing to the galleries.
It represents unquestionably
the feeling of the vast majority
of the American people who
have put such high hopes on.
the success of the U.N. and
do not want it to go the way
of the League of Nations. If
the other nations wish to make
a farce of the U.N., America
had better cease to be a part
ner to such a sinister farce.
Russian government. And, as
a practical matter, China could
not do anything in the United
Nations that Russia can’t do
for her now. That’s thanks to
the one-power veto in the Se
curity Council, for which we
are largely responsible. And
then there’s another thing.
Unless we have another world
war and obliterate Red China,
I think we’d like to see China
become independent of Russia,
and yet we are doing every
thing we can to prevent that
from happening. Doesn’t make
sense, does it”?
“You’re doing the talking.”
“Then I’ll tell you what I’m
really thinking. I’m thinking
Knowland is really out to do
for the United Nations what
Senator Henry Cabot Lodge
and the others did for the
League of Nations—bust it up.
With this country out of It,
there’ll be no United Nations
and the one best hope we now
have of achieving peaceful co
existence among the nations
of the earth will go down the
bloody drain of history.”
She wore diamonds worth
thousands of dollars—and often
pawned them if she needed a
quick dollar lor a down-and-out
pal, man or woman.
Veteran policemen remember
her in the '2os as a nimble
fingered pickpocket who stole
from wealthy customers lured
into her big car by her apparent
affluence and beauty.
She had a horror of riding to
jail in a patrol wagon. Maud
dodged it hundreds of times by
simply surrendering at headquar
ters to inquire if her male victim
had complained. Her scandal
shy victims rarely appeared
against her in court.
Once Maud discovered S4OO
she’d stolen from a West Texas
minister was his congregation’s
cash. She rushed to the police
station to return the money.
“But not a dime of it goes
back to a preacher like you.
coming to Dallas to cavort with
women like me!” she boiled. She
gave the money to detectives and
warned them the red-faced
clergyman was not to be trusted
with church funds.
LOUIE —By Harry Hanan
f‘¥ I • H,mi tr emm >>ihm i—« hmw
Shooting Continues
In Tense Jerusalem
By th* Associated Press
JERUSALEM, July 3.—Both
the Israeli and Jordan cabinets
held emergency meetings with
defense officials yesterday as
sporadic shooting continued
throughout this divided city
despite a cease-fire order from
U. N. armistice authorities.
Seven persons have been re
ported killed and 54 wounded in
three days of shooting across. the
no-man’s-land between the Jew
ish and Arab sectors.
Dispatches from Amman, the
Jordan capital, said King Hus
sein attended an urgent cabinet
meeting there. Lt. Gen. John
Bagon Glubb, British chief of
staff of Hussein’s Arab Legion,
also attended, lt was said.
On the Israeli side of the di
vided city, cabinet and defense
officials also had an emergency
meeting.
In New York, U. N. Secretary
General Dag Hammarskjold
Let your Eyes Convince You
About Luke Barcroft
■ • • . ’ • ' • • \
SEVEN MILES FROM WASHINGTON
f jlpi ulous community for yourself. When
** ii you own a homesite in Lake Barcroft,
l W- .. :?‘i you and your family can vacation all
L a summer long on the three private golden
J, sand beaches. Here father can get home
in time to spend carefree, after-work
j hours fishing and sailing, or plunge in
- " ” for a cool swim For those who like their
* sun in mild doses, tall trees have
* " thoughtfully been left on the beaches
* ' ’’f “„ by our landscape architects. No longer
do > ou need a separate summer home.
■I 13i 33 EXCITING NEW SECTION, All the
‘ ‘ >*£ homesites at Lake Barcroft are beauti
’ *’/’* ‘ ‘ ful, but in our newly opened section are
some of the most desirable of all. This
' r ' ’“''f, \ new section is on the far side of the lake
“ in a woodland setting dotted with in
'l f H ; triguing little coves and rolling hills. It
, « ' ' '■ boasts a variety of scenic homesites
pit S4l 11 ■ ranging upwards in size from a quarter
| 1 -*■ * ’ , acre.
Barcroft Estates is more than a com
- v 1' munity—it’s away of life. Gently roll
' * ;:«■■■ ing Fairfax County hills, towering trees,
'■ five miles of picturesque lake shore, and
? Wgm a jewel of a lake all suggest what is in
" * v store for you here, but nothing can ex-
V "iSIiBI press Lake Barcroft’s personality half
as well as a look for yourself. It has
• a certain breathtaking country charm
that must be seen to be appreciated.
-
'■ ROADS WATER AND SEWERS*
We believe in city conveniences at Lake
«■ Barcroft, and have installed them for
you. Contour-conforming blacktop
« roads—some of them cut on two levels—
wind along the lake. Water and sewers
* . were started before we ever thought of
RESSh li. \ <■.,*, .aHH Wmfe ... selling homesites. And recently widened
Columbia Pike puts Lake Barcroft just
15 minutes from downtown.
DIRECTIONS: Over 14th Street Bridge *■ ESTABLISHED COMMUNITY.
You can save money by staying home
and follow signs to Columbia Pike. Out and spending your vacation at Lake Bar
croft. These hot summer days we re
Columbia Pike one mile poet Baileys
Crossroads to BLAIR ROAD. Turn right
at Lake Barcroft sign. Open Daily to Dark. JSTSmJSJSS.
!■■■■ i mi ■ ■ * your individual needs.
• COME OUT SAT., SUN., MON.
. v ;
called for “immediate and com
plete observance” of the truce
order in a cable to Maj. Gen.
Vagn Bennike, chief of staff of
the U. N.’s Palestine armistice
organization.
In Washington, the United
States called on the governments
of Jordan and Israel directly to
“take immediate steps” to end
the shooting.
* i.
Two Get Jail Terms
In Robbery-Beating
Two men, who pleaded guilty
to charges of assault, larceny
and taking property without
right, were sentenced to one and
one-half years in jail yesterday
by Municipal Judge Milton S.
Kronheim, Jr.
Paul Richmond, 24, colored, of
the 400 block of Kenyon street
N.W. and Ronald C. Gray, 21,
colored of the 400 block of Irving
street N.W. pleaded .guilty to
beating and robbing Howard V.
Hutten, 36, of 6203 Forty-first
place, Hyattsville, about a month
ago near Soldiers Home.
Attack on Democrats
Renewed by Nixon;
Stevenson Replies
By Hi* Atyodstad Preu
Vice President Nixon has re
newed his attacks on Truman
administration foreign policy.
And Adlai Stevenson has de
clared that Mr. Nixon “must be
competing . . . for the title of
history’s most irresponsible ex
alted statesman.”
Mr. Nixon’s fresh charge that
the “previous administration”
had lost 600 million people to
communism came yesterday in
an interview with Representa
tive Keating, Republican, of New
York televised in advance for use
on New York stations last night.
Mr. Stevenson, the 1952 Dem
ocratic presidential candidate,
mentioned Mr. Nixon during an
off-the-cuff talk at a Denver
luncheon in which he urged
Democrats “to do what can be
done to make up for the deficit
in leadership” in the Eisenhower
administration.
A week ago Mr. Nixon opened
up on the Democrats in a Mil
waukee speech with a charge'
that policies of former President
Truman and his Secretary of
State, Dean Acheson, lost China
to the Reds and led to the Ko
rean war and present United
States problems in Indo-China.
Democratic members of Congress
reacted angrily, suggesting that
a bipartisan foreign policy might
be undercut if Eisenhower ad
ministration officials persisted in
this kind of talk. y
Policy “of. Weakness.”
In his discussion with Mr.
Keating, Mr. Nixon said Demo
cratic planners “didn’t under
stand . . . what (he Communist
threat really was.” He said they
left behind a foreign "policy of
weakness, a policy of surrender
of principle at the conference
table.”
On the other hand, he said, the
Eisenhower administration has
“adopted a policy of strength—
one in which our people go to
the conference table . . . de-
THE EVENING STAR, Washington, D. C.
SATPaPAT, JW.T 8. ISQ4 B
termined not to surrender our
principles but to make them
prevail.”
Mr. Stevenson, on his way to
an Alaska vacation, told a gath
ering 'of Democrats that Mr.
Nixon has reversed himself in
statements about Indo-China.
Mr. Stevenson criticized the
administration’s “platoon sys
tem” of Secretaries of State,
wherein foreign policy is laid
down by Secretary Dulles. Sen
ate Majority Leader Knowland
and Mr. Nixon. ,
“An administration that can
not unite its own party, on
essentials at least, can hardly
hope to unite and lead the free
world,” he said.
Mr. Stevenson cited the "public
brawl” of the Army-McCarthy
hearings as an example, saying
the Republican National Com
mittee and Republican leader
ship failed to support Army Sec
retary Stevens.
Democrats Praised. -
He praised, on the other hand,
the actions during the hearings
of Democratic Committee Mem
bers Jackson of Washington.
Symington of Missouri and Mc-
Clellan of Arkansas.
“The national situation,” Mr.
Stevenson said, “is far too
perilous for us as Democrats to
derive any partisan satisfaction
or pleasure from it.”
The audience applauded when
Mr. Stevenson spoke of his pos
sible candidacy again for Presi
dent. Bowing to Colorado’s Na
tional Committeewoman Mar
garite Peyton Thompson, who in
introducing him had lauded Mr.
Stevenson as a prospective
candidate in 1956, he said:
“I am not running for any
thing right now, but the fact is,
I would hate to have you lose
your manuscript.”
Has 9th Child by Caesarian
CHICAGO, July 3 (JP). — a
nigth child by Caesarean sec
tion was bom yesterday to Mrs.
Margaret Thommes, 38. The
baby, a girl, weighed 6 pounds,
4 ounces. The father, Peter
Thommes, sr., 44, is a printing
shop foreman.
* A-2
Nest of Whooping Crane
Sought in Remote Canada
By th* Associated treu
OTTAWA. July 3. The
whooping crane’s greatest secret
—its nesting place—may soon be
out.
Canada’s resources department
yesterday announced that six of
these almost extinct birds, in
cluding young, were sighted from
a helicopter in Wood Buffalo
National Park, astride the boun
dary of Northern Alberta and
the Northwest Territories.
World population of the >
whooping irane is only 24, and
wildlife experts have been try
ing for years to find their nest
ing grounds.
Observers know they winter in
Texas and journey to the Cana
dian north for summer nesting,
but even when they we9re fol
lowed by planes, the cranes got
away wheri reaching the north.
I Os course, for the Fourth
1 —dine on our traditional
> 1 American fare!* Special
•*''l .> holiday menus! Delight-*
| fully air conditioned, with
j private parties occommo-
I dated in the Fairfax
1 Room.

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