OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, September 07, 1954, Image 22

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1954-09-07/ed-1/seq-22/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for A-22 *

A-22 *
THE EVENING STAR
Washington, D. C.
TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 7, 1854
'Small' Stables Take
Nine of 10 Awards
At Warrenton Show
By Robert B. Phillips
Special Correspondent of The Star
WARRENTON. Va.. Sept. 7.
When the vans rumbled out of
the horse show grounds here last
night Warrenton’s three-day
horse marathon seemed to have
proved one thing for sure. What
with the price of oati and the
value of silver today, it is wise
to pour the oats into one or two
good horses before setting out on
a trophy hunt.
Out of 10 hunter champion
ship and reserve ribbons, 9 were
won by stables which had not
entered more than two horses.
There was more to this than met
the eye, for some of the “small”
stables had long strings of re
serves at home. Nevertheless,
the day seems to have passed
when big owners send two pla
toons of hunters into the ring
hoping to swamp the opposition
and stampede the judges.
Even big outfits like Waverly
Farm of Warrentop came here
with a pair of horses. One of
them proved enough, for The
Cad, ridden by Molly Mclntosh,
won the conformation hunter
championship and retired a
trophy previously won by Wav
erly with Bright Light, in 1951,
and Tidal Wave, in 1953.
Reserve to The Cad was Short
Day, owned by Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Burke, of Middleburg,
who were the most richly re
warded of all the exhibitors,
since they showed two horses
they had sold for Mrs. Winstoa
Guest of New York and won two
championships with Star Time,
a 3-year-old son of Star Beacon
Quelle Heure. Star Time was
named champion 3-year-old of
Virginia and jvon the green con
formation hunter championship
by a comfortable margin over
Mrs. Morton Smith’s Jazz Ses
sion. Morton “Cappy” Smith
rode Jazz Session, although he
had refused to show ■ his own
horses, protesting against a rule
requiring that all horses be led
into the ring by grooms.
Another protesting this mat
ter was Harry Newman, owner
of The Plains, Va.,
and his stout hunter. General
Lem, won a reserve champion
ship in the small hunter division.
Peggy Augustus of Cobham
rode her black hunter. Defense,
to a half-point victory in tne
working hunter championship,
easing out Dudley Williams of
Greensboro, N. C.. on Bold Ann.
An Annapolis horse, the re
formed saddler. Rusty, took the
open honors for Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Skipper.
Baseball
1 (Continued From Page A-20.)
squeeze bunt which scored a
third man.
Five runs in the first inning
against Don Newcombe put the
Pirates on the winning trail in
the second game and the Dodg
ers couldn’t catch up despite
home runs by Roy Campanella,,
Jackie Robinson and Sandy
Amoros.
At Baltimore, Lemon’s hitting
support in the first game came
mainly from A1 Smith, who
banged two doubles and two sin
gles. Dick Kryhoski’s
loaded single in the 10th inning
of the nightcap prevented a
Cleveland sweep and marked the
Orioles’ first victory over the In
dians in 18 games.
Picrsall and Williams Star.
Andy Carey’s bases-loaded
single in the last of the ninth
climaxed the Yankees’ uphill
'climb against Boston in the
opener at Yankee Stadium. Jim
my Piersall’s two-run homer in
the eighth gave the Red Sox the
runs they needed to capture the
second game. Ted Williams col
lected four straight hits in the
nightcap and six during the
afternoon.
Ned Garver held the White Sox
to four hits in Detroit's first vic
tory. Harvey Kuenn singled
home the winning run in the
lflth inning of the second game
after Minnie Minoso had tied the
score in the ninth with a homer.
Harvey Haddix of the Card
inals won his first game since
Jtlly 30 and his 16th of the sea
son in beating Cincinnati on
eight hits. Ted Kluszewski. the
majors’ leading home run hitter,
<* Vra’3 sidelined with a swollen
ankle.
Bethesda Bowlers Meet
The Bethesda Duckpin League
will hold its final pre-season
3;eting tomorrow at 8 p.m. at
e Boulevard Alleys. Teams
wishing franchises should send
representatives or phone Oliver
2-9898.
Nearly $2 Million
Bet on 14 Races
At Lincoln Downs
By th* Associated Press
LINCOLN, R. 1., Sept. 7.—A
rtcord crowd of 32,327 pumped
$1,991,450 through the pari
mutuel windows at Lincoln
Downs yesterday for a 14-race
Libor Day program.
. The turnout for the second
day’s card of a hurricane-delayed
fill meeting Just missed provid
ing Lincoln s first $2 million
handle, but the wagering set a
track mark.
Only the $2,178,063 wagered
at Rockingham Park's 14-race
Armistice Day double-headei
last year tops yesterday's handle
Hj New England racing history
The 14-race program was rur
as a continuous card with the
flfst race off at 11:12 a.m. By
early afternoon automobiles were
parked for miles in all direc
tions. *
In the featured SIO,OOO mile
and-a-sixteenth Labor Day Han
dicap Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Lingle’i
| New England handicap star
1 Larry Ellis, rewarded the fan;
» who backed him down to ever
m money, winning in 1:44. Larr?
* Ellis paid $4, $3.40 and $2.60.
1 "i
- - " T —f I'll
* ' *fjMi
mm H I 1
i ' ' T 4 . <T V-V' " : V * ’* *i ’
/flji. ti 11k,.,**,
w v - i, iss m -
w J|f
£ • ” =■
musk ..... WamSSumßßmmlm
TBraSjßfefe. >■ ■' ‘ v .
DOING THE SECOND-BASE JlG—Umpire Lee Ballanfant goes into a dance routine and Don
Hoak, Dodger third baseman, loses his cap on this play in the first inning of the first game
with the Pirates yesterday at Brooklyn. Hoak slides in with a double as Curt Roberts, Pitts
burgh second baseman, tries to nail him. The Dodgers got off fast with a five-run second
inning, but wound up losing both games of the doubleheader, 9-6 and 9-7. —AP Wirepfaoto.
Yesterday's Major Leoque Box Scores
Indians, 6-6; Orioles, 1 -3
FIRST GAME.
Cleveland. A.H.O.A. Baltimore. A.H.O.A.
Sraith.lf 5 4 10 Abrams, rs 4 2 4 0
Avila,2b 3 111 Coan.ll 4 0 0 0 j
Doby.cf 2 0 2 0 Fox.p 0 0 0 2 j
Rosen.3b 63 13 Krvski.lb 4 011 1
Wertz,lb 3 0 9 1 Kendy.3b 4 0 13 1
Glynn,lb 2 13 0 Court'ey.c 4 13 11
Phllley.rf 4 2 6 0 Diering.cl 4 111!
Dente.ss 2 0 10 Young,2b 4 12 2
3trtckd.s* 2 110 Hunter,ss 4 14 4
Hegan.c 4 13 0 Piilette.p 2 2 12
Lemon.p 3 10 3 IFridley.ll 10 0 0
Totals 35 14 27 8 Totals 35 827 15
1 Walked for Fillette In 7th.
Cleveland 101 020 011—6
Baltimore 001 000 000—1
Runs—Smith (3), Avila. Glynn. Le
mon. Plllette. Error—Kryhoskl. Runs
batted In—Doby. Coan. Smith, PhUley,
Rosen. Two-base hits—Smith (2). Three
base hits—Lemon. Phllley. Sacrifices—
Avila (2). Sacrifice fly—Doby. Left on
bases —Cleveland, 8: Baltimore, 8.
Bases on balls—Off Lemon, 1; off Pil
lette. 2; off Fox, 1. Struck out—By
Lemon, 3: by Fox. 1. Hits—Off Pil
lette, 7 in 7 innings: off Fox, 7 in 2
innings. Runs and earned runs—Off
Lemon, 1-1: off Pillette, 4-4: off Fox.
2-2. WUd pitch—Pillette. Winning
pitcher—Lemon (21-6). Losing pitcher
—Pillette (9-14). Time—2:l9.
SECOND GAME.
Cleveland. A.H.O.A. Baltimore. A.H.O.A.
Smith.lf 6 2 0 0 Abrams.rf 4 0 3 0
Avila.2b .6316 Young,2b 5 3 2 1
Dooy.cf 6 0 0 0 Kry'ski.lb 5 2 8 0 1
R'n.3.lb.ss 4 0 4 2 Ken’edy.3b 4 114;
Wertz,lb .2180 Courtney.c 4161
Glynn,lb 0 0 10 Coan,lf .4140
2Pope 1 0 0 0 Diering.cf 3 0 6 0 1
Re'lado.3b 10 0 1 Hunter.ss 2 0 11
Philley.rf 3 0 10 lWaitkus 110 0
Stic l’nd.ss 2 0 4 2 Bi'e’e’ser.ss 10 0 1
IlMit'elUb 1 0 2 0 Larsen.p 3 2 0 0
Karagon.c 10 4 1 Chakales.p 110 0
4Majeski 110 0
sHegan,e 00 10
Garcia, p 3 0 10
Mossi.p 0 0 0 1
SLemon .110 0
TWestlake 0 0 0 0
Wynn.p __ 0 0 0 0
Totals 35 8x 27 13 Totals 37 12 30 8
1 Singled for Hunter in 7th.
2 Struck out for Glynn in Bth.
3 Plied out for Strickland in oth.
4 Singled for Naragon in 9th.
5 Ran for Majeskl in 9th.
6 Doubled for Mossi in 9th.
7 Ran for Lemon in 9th.
8 None out when winning run scored.
Cleveland 000 000 002 o—2
> Baltimore 000 000 200 I—3
Runs Hegan, Westlake. Courtney,
Dicrlng. Chakales. Errors—None. Runs
batted in. Waitkus. Larsen, Lemon, ,
Smith. Kryhoski. Two-base hits—Avila, |
Courtney, Kennedy. Lemon. Sacrifices—
Naragon. Abrams. Double play—Hunter
to Kryhoski; Avila to Wertz; Courtney
to Kennedy. Lett on bases—-Cleveland, 9;
Baltimore, 9. Bases on balls—Oß Garcia.
1; ofl Larsen, o' Struck out—By Garcia,
2, by Larsen, 4; by Wynn, 1. Hits—
OB Garcia. 8 in 6*u innings; ofl Massi,
1 in 1',3 innings: ofi Wynn, 3 in 1
inning liaced 4 batters in 10th): ofl
Larsen 8 in 8~, innings; off Chakales 0
In 1 Innings. Runs and earned runs—
Off Garcia, 2-2: off Mossi. 0-0; off Wynn,
1-1: off Larsen. 2-2; off Chakales, 0-0.
Winning pitcher—Chakales, (5-71. Losing
pitcher Wynn (19-11). Time—2:4o.
Attendance—27.2lo.
Giants, 8-4; Phils, 4-5
FIRST GAME.
New York. A.lfO.A Phila. A.H.O.A.
Lock'n.lb 3 1111 Ashburn.cf 4 0 5 0
Dark.ss 5 3 0 2 Schell,lf 3 0 3 0
Thom'n.3b 5 3 1 3 Lopata.c 4 12 0
Mays.cf 4 2 3 2 Hamner.2b 4 0 4 2;
Rhoctes.lf 4 14 0 Ennis.rf 2 10 0
Mueller.rf 4 12 0 Morgan.ss 4 13 5
Wil!la's.2b 4 111 Jones,3b 4 4 0 0
Katt.c 4 15 0 Torg'on.lb 3 0 9 4
Llddle.p 3 0 0 0 Dickson.p 110 0
Grissom,p 1 0 0 0 Miller.p 10 10
Clark,rf 2 10 1
1 Baker 0 0 0 0
2Wytek,lf 10 0 0
Rldzik.p 0 0 0 0
3Burgess 10 0 0
Totals 37 13 27 9 Totals 34 927 12
1 Walked for MilleT tn 7th.
2 Took 3d strike for Schell in 7th.
3 Filed out for Ridzik In 9th.
New York 202 200 011—8
Philadelphia 020 002 000—4
Runs—Lockman (3). Dark, Thomp
son (2). Mays. Katt, Lopata, Morgan.
Jones. Clark. Errors—Diddle. Lockman.
Mays.'Runs batted In—Thompson <3).
1 Dickson (2). Mays, Rhodes. Dark (2).
Clark. Jones. Mueller. Two-base hits—
Dark. Jones. Three-base hits—Clark,
Mays. Home run— Thompson. Double
plays—Morgan to Hamner to Torge
son: Torgeson to Morgan to Torgeson:
Mays to Lockman. Left on bases—New
York. 4: Philadelphia. 5. Bases on balls
—Off Liddle.l: off Grissom. 1: off Dick
son. 2. Struck out—By Liddle. 1: by
Grissom. 2: by Dickson, 1: by Miller, 1.
Hits—Off Liddle. 8 in 6 Innings; off
Dickson. 8 in 3*4 Innings: off Miller.
1 in 3Va Innings, off Ridzik. 4 In 2
innings: off Grissom. 1 in 3 Innings.
Runs and earned runs—Off Liddle. 4-4;
off Dickson. 6-6; off Miller. 0-0: off
Ridzik. 2-2: off Grissom, 0-0. Wild
pitch—Ridzik. 2. Winning pitcher—
Liddle (7-3). Losing pitcher—Dickson
(9-17). Time—2:4s.
SECOND GAME.
New York A.H.O.A. Fhtla. A.H.O.A.
L'kman.lb 5 0 10 1 Ashburn.cf 6 3 5 0
Dark.ss 5 12 3 Clark.lf 5 2 10
T'pson.3b 5 0 2 1 Lopata.c 3 2 6 0
Mays.cf 4 13 0 Hamner.2b 5 13 1
Rhodes.lf 5 12 0 Ennis.rf 5 2 3 0
Mueller.rf 4 13 1 Morgan.ss 5 12 3
Will'ms,2b 3 0 2 0 Jones.3b 5 2 0 4
Katt.c 4 17 2 T'geson.lb 2 O 7 0
McCall.p 2 o 0 1 Roberts.p 5 0 0 2
Wilhelm.p 00 0 0 1 Simmons 00 0 0
2lrvin 110 0 Burgess.c 2 0 2 0
Llddle.p 0 0 0 1 Wyr'tek.lb 1 .0 5 0
Corwin.p 0 0 0 0
i Grissom.p 00 10
i .‘IC tleman 10 0 0
! W'th'gton.p 0 0 0 0
| Totals 39 6x32 10 Totals 44 13 33 10
‘x Two out when winning run scored.
1 Ran and scored for Lopata in 6th.
i 2 Hit home run for Wilhelm In 7th.
3 Struck out for Grissom in 10th.
! New York 000 100 210 00—4
| Philadelphia _ 000 004 000 01—6
i Runs—Dark. Mays. Mueller. Irvin, Ash
burn. Clark. Hamner. Ennis, Simmons.
Errors—Williams. Torgeson. Thompson.
Runs batted in—Rhodes. Jones (2). Irvin
, (2), Ennis. Dark. Hamner. Two-base
1 hits—Katt. Mays. Ennis. Lopata. Mor
: gan. Home runs—lrvin. Dark. Stolen
' base Mavs. Sacrifice hits Williams.
I Clark. Double plays—Katt to Williams:
Mueller to Lockman. Left on base—New
, York. 4: Philadelphia. 12. Bases on balls
—Off Wilhelm, 2: off Grissom. 1: off
Worthington, 1; off Roberts. 1. Struck
out —Bv McCall, 3: by Corwin. 1; by
Grissom. 1; by Worthington, 2: by Rob
eats. 7. Hits—Ofl McCall. 6 in sti in
njnes: off Roberts. 6 in 11 innings; ofl
Wilhelm. 1 in »s Inning: off Liddle. 1 in
, inning: off Corwin. 1 in H inning;
' off Orlssom. 1 in Hi innings; off Worth
ington. 4 in I*4 innings Runs and
earned runs —Off McCall. 2-1: off Wil
r helm. 2-0; off Worthington. 1-2: ofl
i xtr&jAsi srw&aasK
1 35.27^.
Yanks, 6-7; Red Sox, 5-8
FIRST GAME.
Boston. A.H.O.A. New York A.H.O.A. i
Good'n,2b 5 2 2 3 Bauer,rf 4 1 3 1 1
Willia’s.lf 4 2 2 0 Noren.lf . 3 110
Jensen,cf 3 2 4 0 Mantle.cf 3 14 0,
Agganls.lb 2 17 0 Berra.c . 4 3 6 1;
Mele.rf 4 110 Skowr’n.lb 4 17 0
Piersail.rf 00 0 0 McDo'd,2b 30 11 !
Hatton.3b 3 0 2 4 3Robinson 1 0 0 0,
White,c 3 0 5 1 Cole’an,2b 0 0 0 2
Bolling.ss 4 12 1 Carey.3b 5 2 10
Parnell,p. 3 0 0 0 Mlranda.ss 2 0 2 2,
Kinder,p . 1 0 0 0 I Slaughter 000 0;
Hudson,p. 0 0 0 0 Konst’y.p Oi 0 0 1
4 Collins _ 1 100,
* Reynolds,p 0 0 0 1'
Grlm.p 2 0 0 0
2Cerv 0 0 0 0
Morgan.p 0 O O O
Rizzuto.sa 10 0 0
.VByrne 10 0 0
Held.ss 0 0 2 1
Totals 31 9 x 25 9 Totals 34 10 27 10
x One out when winning run scored,
1 Walked for Miranda in 6th.
2 Batting for Grim when Slaughter
was picked off base In 6th.
3 Struck out ior McDougald in 7th.
4 Homered for Konstanty in Bth.
5 Filed out for Rizzuto tn Bth.
Boston 002 002 100—6 !
New Yjork 101 000 112—6,j
Runs—Goodman (2). Williams, Jen
sen, Agganis, Bauer (2). Noren (2). i
Mantle. Collins. Error—Bolling. Runs
batted in—Williams, Jensen (2), Mele. ■
White. Berra (2), Skowron. (2), CclUns, 1
Carey. Two-base hit—Carey. Three
base hit—Williams. Home run—Col- |
line. Sacrifice—Noren. Sacrifice flies— !
White. Jensen. Double plays—Bauer to !
Skowron; Coleman to Held to Skowron. !
Left on bases—Boston. 8 - New York.
12. Bases on balls—Off Parnell, 5: off i
Kinder. 2; off Hudson, 1; off Grim. 4; !
off Morgan. 1; off Konstantv. 1: off R#y- 1
nolds, 1. Struck out—By Parnell, 3: by
Kinder, 2; by Grim. 5. Hits—Off Par
nell, 7 in 6% innings; off Kinder, 2 in i
1)4 innings; off Hudson. 1 in Vi in- i
ning; off. Grim, 7 in 6 innings: off,
Morgan. 2 in H inning: off Konstanty,
0 in l?i innings: off Reynolds. 0 in 1
Inning. Runs and earned runs—Off Par- i
nell, 3-2; off Kinder. 3-3; off Hudson, I
0-0; off Grim, 4-4; off Morgan, 1-1;
off Konstanty, 0-0; off Reynolds. 0-n. ;
Wild pitch—Parnell. Winning pitcher I
—Reynolds (11-3). Losing pitcher—
Kinder (7-8). Time—3:l6.
SECOND GAME.
Boston. A.H.O.A. New York. A.H.O.A. 1
G'dman.2b 4 2 15 Bauer,rf-lf 4 12 0
Williams,lf 54 2 0 Noren.lf 10 10
Jensen.cf 5 12 0 tiCerv.lf 1 o '.O 0
Mele.lb 3 18 0 Rizzuto.sa 0 0 11
2Ag’nis,lb 2 1-fl 0 lOßyrne 10 0 0
Olson.rf 310 1 Coleman.ss 00 0 1
SMaxwell 1 0 0 0 Mantle.cf 4 0 4 0
Hurd.p 10 0 1 Berra.c 6 3 5 0
White,c 5 0 5 1 Skowron,] b 3 2 5 1
Leocio,3b 3 12 0 SCollins.lb 2 0 2 0
SConsOlo.ss 0 0 0 0 McDo ld.2b 5 2 4 2
Bolling,ss 3 12 3 Carey.3b 4 2 0 2
4Hatton.3b 10 10 Miranda.ss 2 12 1
Kiely.p 2 111 7Slau'ter.rf 1 O O 0
Clevenger,p 0 0 11 Ford.p 2 0 13
ILenhardt 1 0 0 0 Reynolds.p 0 0 0 0
Piersail.rf 112 0 ORobinson 10 0 0
Sain.p 0 0 0 0
Totals 40 14 27 13 Totals 36 11 27 11
1 Grounded out for Clevenger In 7th.
2 Flied out for Mele In 7th.
3 Struck out for Olson In 7th. i
4 Flied out for Bolling In Bth.
5 Ran for Lepcio in Bth.
6 Safe on error for Noren in sth.
7 Grounded out for Miranda in sth.
8 Flied out for Skowron in 7th.
9 Flied out for Reynolds in 7th.
10 Lined out for Rizzuto in Bth.
Boston \ 000 001 520—8
New York 100 060 000—7
Runs—Goodman, Williams (21, Jensen,
Lepcio, Consolo. Bolling. Piersail. Bauer,
Noren, Cerv. Mantle, Berra, Miranda.
Ford. Errors—Kiely, Bolling (21. Runs
batted in—Olson. Williams. Goodman,
Jensen (3). Piersail (2). Skowron, Cerv,
Berra (3). McDougald. Two-base hits—
Williams, .Agganis. Berra. Home runs —
Jensen, Piersail. Sacrifices —Ford, Riz
zuto. Double plays—Goodman to Mele;
McDougald to Rizzuto to Skowron. Left
on bases —Boston, 7; New York, 8. Bases
on balls—Off Kiely, 3; off Hurd, 1: off
Ford, l; off Sain. 1. Struck out—By
Kiely. 2; by Clevenger, 1; by Hurd, 2:
by Ford, 4: by Reynolds, 1. Hits—Ofl
Kiely, 6 in 4‘v innings; off Clevenger,
3 in 1*,4 Innings; off Hurd. 2 In 3
innings; off Ford. 10 in 6V» innings; off
Reynolds, 1 In *4 Inning; off Sain, 3 in
2 innings. Runs and earned runs—Off
Kiely, 7-1: ofl Clevenger. 0-0; off Hurd,
0-0; off Ford, 5-5; off Reynolds, 1-L;
off Sain, 2-2. Winning pitcher—Hurd
(2-0). Losing pitcher—Sain i5-o>. Time
—2:38. Attendance —39,969.
Cardinals, 8; Rediegs, 1
St. Louts. A.H.O.A Cincinnati. A.H.O.A.
Moon.cf 5 13 0 Harm’n.Sb 4 13 0
Hemus.2b 5 2 4 1 M'Mil'n.ss 4 2 3 1
Musial.rf 3 2 3 0 Bell.cf 4 0 4 0
Jbr.ski.3b 4 3 14 B'k’ski.lb 4 12 0
Rep’lski.lf 5 10 0 Or ngr’s.lf 4 0 2 0
! Rice.c 3 16 0 Post.rf 3 0 4 1
1 1 Sch'field 0 0 0 0 Temple 2b 4 3 2 1
! Sarnl.c 1 0 2 0 2 Murphy 0 0 0 0
i C’n’h m.lb 4 2 6 1 S’minick.c 3 17 2
Grmas.ss 3 2 11 Nuxhall.p 2 0 0 1
Haddix,p 40 10 Drews,p ?2 S S
3 Adams 10 0 0
B'z'wski.P 0 0 0 0 ;
Lane.p 0 0 0 0 i
4 Bridges 10 0 0
Totals 37 14 27 7 Totals 34 827 6
1 Ran for Rice in 7th.
2 Ran for Temple in 9th.
3 Popped out for Drews in 7th.
4 Fouled out for Lane in 9th.
St Louis HI 011 120—8
Cincinnati 000 100 000—I
Runs—Moon. Hemus (2). _ Muslal,
Jablonskl, Schofield. Orammas, Cunning
ham. Temple. Errors —Temple (21. Runs
batted in—Jablonski (3). Grammas (2).
Moon. Harmon Haddix, Cunning
ham. Two-base hits —Grammas. Musial.
Seminick. McMillan. Stolen base—Cun
ningham. Sacrifice files Jablonski,
Grammas. Harmon. Haddix. Double
play Seminick to McMillan. Left
on bases St. Louis. Jl> Cincinnati.
, 9. Bases on balls—Off Haddix, 2; off
Nuxhall. 2; off Drews. 2; off Baczewski, 1.
Struck out— By Haddix. .; by Nuxhall,
,4; by Drews, 1; by Lane. 1. Hit*-—Off
Nuxhall. 10 in 514 Innings; off Drews. ■
1 in I*4 innings: off Baczewski. 2 in o
Innings (faced three batters In Bth). off
Lane. 1 In 2. Runs and earned runs—
Off Nuxhall. 5-4: off Drews. 1-1; off
Baczewski. 2-2; off Lane. 0-0; off Had
dix, 1-1. Hit by pitcher—By NuxhaU
(Musial). Winning pitcher—Haddix
(16-1 IK Losing pitcher—Nuxhall (9-4).
Xime—2:46. Attendance —6.570.
Senators
(Continued From Page A-20.)
2-0 lead in the first inning of
the second game against Bishop
as Eddie Yost walked, Jim Busby
singled, Elmer Valo inserted' an
error and Pete Runnels doubled.
The A’s picked up a run off
loser Gus Keriazakos in the third
inning when Spook Jacobs
singled, stole second base and
scored on Lou Limmer’s double.
Bill Wilson tied the score in the
fourth with a home run into the
, centerfleld bleacher and the A’s
produced the winning run with
i i two down in the eighth when
* Wilson singled and Valo tripled.
A
• >
Pirates, 9-9; Dodger, 6-7
FIRST GAME.
Pittsbarrh. A.H.O.A. Broaklyn. A.H.O.A.
Roberts,2b 6 14 1 Gilliam.2b 5 2 4 4
Skinner, lb 7 2 8 1 Reese,ss 5 2 3 2
Ward.rf 5 110 Snider,cf 5 2 4 0
Thomas,cf 6 2 2 0 Hodges.lb 6 19 1
Gordon.3b 4 2 14 Amoros.lf 4 14 0
Atwell,c 5 112 0 Furillo.rf 5 110
Lynch.lf 1110 Hoak.Sb 6 12 4
Hall,lf 5 3 2 0 Walker,c 5 19 2
Cole.ss , 41 0 0 6Zimmer 00 0 0
3Allie,ss 0 0 5 0 Meyer,p 10 0 1
Surkont.p 0 0 0 1 Labine.p 0 0 0 0
Purkey.p 40 0 1 IShuba 10 0 0
4Shepard 1 0 0 0 DarneU.p 0 0 0 1
Law.p 0 0 0 1 2Moryn 10 0 0
Hughes.p 0 0 0 1
sßoblnson 10 0 0
Loes.p 0 0 0 0
Wojey.p 0 0 0 1
7Podres 10 0 0
Totals 48 14 36 9 Totals 44 11 36 17
1 Grounded out for Labine In 6th.
2 Grounded out for Darnell In Btb.
3 Ran for Cole in 9th.
' 4 Grounded out for Purkey in 10th.
5 Popped out for Hughes in 10th.
6 Ran for Walker in 12th.
7 Popped out for Wojey in 12th.
Pittsburgh 000 060 000 003—9
Brooklyn 050 000 010 000—6
Runs —Roberts, Skinner, Thomas, Gor
don, Atwell (2). Hall (2), Purkey, Gil
liam (2), Amoros, Furillo. Hoak, Walker.
Errors—Lynch, Reese, Gilliam, Hoak,
Runs batted in—Hoak. Walker (2), Gil
liam. Snider. Hall (2), Skinner (4).
Reese. AIHe, Law, Roberts. Two-base Jilts
—Snider (2). Amoros. Hoak. Atwell.
Gilliam Three-base hit—Reese. Home
run—Skinner. Stolen bases—Snider, Fu
rillo. Sacrifice files Meyer, Amoros.
Gordon, Roberts. Double plays—Hoak to
Gilliam to Hodges (2). Left on bases—
Pittsburgh, 11; Brooklyn. 13. Bases on
balls—Off Surkont, 2; off Purkey. 6; off
Law. 1; off Meyer. 1; off Labine. 1; off
Hughes. 1: off Loes, 3. Struck out—By
Purkey. 8: by Law, 2; by Meyer. 4; by
Darnell, F; by Hughes. 3; by Loes, 1. !
Hits —Off Surkont. 6 In I‘4 Innings; off
Purkey. 4 In 7*4 innings; off Law. 1 in
3 Innings; off Meyer. 7 in 4V 3 innings;
off Labine. 1 in I*3 innings; off Darnell,
2 in 2 innings; off Hughes, 3 in 2 in
nings; off Loes, 1 in lVi innings; off
Wojey. 0 in *4 inning. Runs and earned
runs—Off Surkont, 5-5; off Purkey, 1-1;
; off Law, 0-0; off Meyer. 6-5; off Labine,
! 0-0; off Darnell. 0-0; off Hughes. 0-0;
i off Loes, 3-2; off Wojey. 0-0. Winning
pitcher—Law (9-13). Losing pitcher—
i Loes (11-4). Time—3:s6.
SECOND GAME.
Plttsb’rgb. A.H.O.A. Brooklyn. A.H.O.A
I R b’rts, 2b 3 11 3 Gilliam,2b 3 12 6
i Skinner,lb 418 1 Reese,ss 40 3 3
! Ward.rf 3 110 Snider.cf 52 10
i Thomas.cf 4 15 0 Hodges.lb -6 113 2
Gordon,3b 4 113 Amoros. If 4 2 1 0
j Atwell,c 416 0 Furillo.rf 4 0 11
i Hall,lf 4 12 0 R’bl s'n.Sb 4 3 14
i'Allie.ss 4 2 3 2 C’p’nella.c 4 2 5 1
Thies. p 3 0 0 0 N'c’mbe.p 0 0 0 0
Friend,p 0 0 0 0 Palica.p 10 0 0
lPodres 10 0 0
LaSorda.p 0 0 0 0
2Moryn 10 0 0
DarneU.p 0 0 0 0
.IShuba 10 0 0
Hughes,p 0 0 0 0
Total 33 927 9 Totals 37 11 27 17
1 Grounded out for Palica In sth.
2 Grounded out for LaSorda In 7th.
3 Flied out for Darnell in Bth.
Pittsburgh 500 200 200—9
Brooklyn 020 001 220—7
Runs—Roberts (2). Skinner (2),
Ward, Thomas (2), Gordon. Atwell.
Snider. Hodges. Amoros. Robinson (2),
Campanella (2) Errors Robinson,
Thies Runs batted in—Atwell. Hall,
Allie, Robinson (2). Campanella (2),
Ward (2». Amoros (2), Thomas (2),
Gilliam. Two-base hits—Ward, Camp
anella, Snider. Home runs—Robinson,
Campanella Amoros, Thomas. Stolen
base—Robinson. Sacrifice fly—Gilliam.
Sacrifices —Ward, Thies. Double play—
Gilliam to Reese to Hodges. Left on
bases—Pittsburgh. 6; Brooklyn 6. Bases i
on balls—Off Thies. 1: off Friend, 1; j
off Newcombe, 2; off Palica, 3; off 1
LaSorda. 1. off Hughes. 1. Struck out—
By Thies, 3; by Friend. 3; by Palica, i
2; by LaSorda, 3. Hits—Off Thies, 9
in 7 innings; off Friend, 2 In 2 innings; j
off Newcombe. 3 in >4 innings; off Palica,
4 in 4% innings; off LaSorda, 1 in 2 I
innings: off Darnell, 1 in 1 inning; off i
Hughes, 0 m 1 Inning. Runs and earned
runs—Off Thies. 7-7; off Friend 0-0; I
off Newcombe, 5-5: ofl Palica, 2-2: off i
LaSorda. 2-2; off Darnell, 0-0. Winning
pitcher—Thies (3-6). Losing pitcher—
Newcombe (7-8) Time—2:27., Attend
ance—2l,s6l.
Braves, 13-6; Cubs, 2-1
FIRST GAME.
Chicago. A.H.O.A. Mllw’akee. A.H.O.A.
Talbot,cf 4 2 10 Bruton,cf o 1 6 0
Baker, 2b 4 16 1 Math's, 3b 5 5 11
Fondy.lb 30 3 1 20’C’n'l,3b 0 0 11
, Bilko.lb 10 3 0 Adcock.lb 42 6 1
I Sauer,lf 4 13 0 Th'ms'n If 3 0 2 0
; ILary 0 0 0 0 P’dlet'n.lf 110 0
; Banks,ss 412 2 Pafko rs .1 12 0
! Jackson,2b 4 0 12 M'k'v’h.rf 10 0 0
Rice.rf 4 0 2 0 Crandall,c 4 12 1
! G’r’glola.c 3 13 1 C'lder'ne.c 113?
KU'pst'n.p 2 10 0 Logan.ss 5 2 2 1
Zick.p 110 0 Smalley ,ss 0 0 0 0
Dittm'r.2b 4 3 3 1
Johnson.p 210 0
Totals 34 824 7 Totals 38 18 27 6
1 Ran for Sauer In 9th.
2 Ran for Mathews In Bth.
‘ Chicago 000 000 020— 2
i Milwaukee . 201 017 02x—13
Runs—Garagiola, Zick. Bruton. Math
ews (4), O’Connell. Adcock (2). Pafko,
Crandall Logan. Dittmer. Johnson.
Errors —Garagiola. Jackson. Runs batted
in—‘-Talbot, Baker. Mathews (2). Pafko
(2), Johnson. Bruton, Crandall (3).
Pendleton. Calderone. Two-base hit—
Mathews Home runs —Mathews. Cran
dall Stolen Bases—Mathews. Adcock.
Sacrifices —Johnson (2). Sacrifice fly—
Pafko. Double plays—Baker to Banks
to Bilko; O’Connell to Dittmer. Left on
bases—Chicago, 5: Milwaukee. 6. Bases
on balls—Off Klippstein. 2.. Struck out—
By Klippstein, 1; by Zlck, 1: by John
son, 5. Hits —Off Klippstein. 9 In 5
Innings (pitched to 2 in 6th); off
Ziek. 9 in 3 innings. Runs and earned
runs—Off Klippstein. 6-4; off Zick. 7-,;
off Johnson. 2-2 Balk—Johnson. Win
ning pitcher—Johnson <5-1 *• L ° s !. l ’*
pitcher—Klippstein (3-11). Time —2.37.
SECOND GAME.
Chicago. A.H.O.A. Milwaukee. A.H.O.A.
! Talbot.cf 4 13 0 Bruton.cf 53 4 0
1 Garagiola 110 0 Pdleton.lf 5 3 3 0
2Mlksls 0 0 0 0 Adcock.lb 4 0 9 0
Baker.2b 5 16 2 Math's.3b 43 14
Jackson.3b 414 2 O Con'l,3b 00 0 0
Sauer,lf 4 13 0 Pafko,rf 3 0 4 0
Banks.ss 410 2 Crandall.c 4 110
Rice.rf 401 f) Logan.ss 20 2 3
Bilko.lb 434, 0 Dittmer,2b 213 4
McCul'gh.c 4 2 3 0 Burlette.p 4 0 0 1
Cole.p 2 111
aßaumh'i 1000
Jeffcoat.p 0 0 0 1
4Morgan 00 0 0
Totals 37 12 24 8 Total* 33 11 27 12
1 Singled for Talbot in 9th.
2 Ran for Garagiola in 9th.
3 Flied out for’ Cole in 7th.
4 Hit sacrifice fly for Jeffcoat in 9th.
’ Chicago - 000 000 001—1
Milwaukee . 200 004 OOx—6
Runs—Bilko. Bruton (2). Pendleton.
Crandall. Dittmer. Burdette. Errors—
i Cole. Logan. Runs batted in—Morgan.
I Adcock. Mathews. Bruton (2). Two-base
hits—Bilko (2). Pendleton. Home run
—Bruton. Sacrifice—Logan. Sacrifice
flies—Adcocky Morgan. Double plays—
Banks to Baker to Bilko; Logan to Ditt
; mer to Adcock: Dittmer to Logan to
Adcock. Left on bases—Chicago. 10;
I Milwaukee, 10. Bases on balls—Off Cole.
;3: off Jeffcoat. 2. Struck out—By Cole,
I 1; by Jeffcoat, 2: by Burdette. 1. Hits—
Off Cole. 9 in 6 innings: off Jeffcoat. 2
in 2 innings. Runs and earned runs—
Off Cole. 6-5; off Jeffcoat. 0-0; off Bur
-1 dette, 1-1. Winning pitcher—Burdette
(13-11). Losing pitcher—Cole. (3-7).
Time —2:22. Attendance—43.2o7.
%
Sewell Guides Leafs
To First International
Pennant Since 1943
By the Associated Press
The Toronto Maple Leafs, who
won their last pennant 11 years
ago, are the new champions of
the International League.
Manager Luke Sewell, former
Cincinnati Redleg and St. Louis
Browns mentor, led the Leafs to I
success in his first year as head
man. The last time Toronto won
the pennant was back in 1943
under Burleigh Grimes.
Toronto defeated the Rochester
Red Wings, 3-2, on a two-run
homer by Elston Hpward in the
first game while the Montreal
Royals dropped their opener to
the Ottawa Athletics, 5-4, yes
terday. That assured the Leafs
of the flag.
Rochester came back and took !
the seven-inning nightcap, 4-1. |
The Royals won, 2-0, behind the I
three-hit pitching of Glenn |
Mickens in their second game. x
The Syracuse Chiefs, fighting
for a playoff berth, split a double
header with the Buffalo Bisons.
Buffalo took the opener, 3-2, and
Syracuse the nightcap, 5-2.
In a single game, the Rich
mond Virginians defeated the
Havana Cuban Sugar Kings, 6-2.
The fight for the remaining spot
for the playoffs still continues
between the Kings, Chiefs and
Bisons.
Howard, battling for the league
batting championship with
Rochester’s Bill Virdon, hit the
Toronto homer in the sixth in
ning after a single by Hector
Rodriguez.
Connie Johnson went the route
and struck out six for his 17th
victory against seven defeats.
Memo Luna, the first of three
Rochester hurlers, lasted until
the seventh and was tagged with
his 10th defeat in 18 decisions.
Jack Faszholz allowed the Leafs
six' scattered hits in the second,
gaining his 17th victory against
eight losses.
Davis Offers $25,000
For Shot at Saddler
By th« Associated Press
NEW YORK, Sept. 7.—Ever
ready Teddy (Red Top) Davis
made another pitch today for a
title shot at Sandy Saddler,
featherweight champion, and
his manager said he’d back it up
with cash.
“Saddler can have $25,000 if
he’ll fight Red Top for the
championship in New Haven,”
1 Manager Mushky Salow said
after his busy little contender
outpointed Armand Savoie, Ca
nadian lightweight champion,
last night.
“I’ve been chasing him for two
years,” said Davis, No. 4 feath
j erweight from Hartford, Conn,
j “If I ever catch up to him I’m
I gonna make him pay for keep
! ing me waiting so long. I guar
! antee you, I’ll knock him out in
five rounds.”
The victory over the 136-
pound Savoie by unanimous de
cision was Red Top’s fourth in
a row.
Built up to 133% so he would
not give away too much weight,
Davis threw punches in a steady
stream from the opening bell. It
was a lively fight all the way
and the small crowd of about 500
for the telecast show whooped it
up constantly in St. Nicholas
Arena.
Over at Eastern Parkway in
Brooklyn, Ted Olla, 163%, Mil
waukee, and Jesse Turner, 159,
St. Louis, fought a 10-round
draw in another televised bout.
Fights Last Night
NEW YORK.—Teddy (Red Top) Davis,
! 133 >4, Hartford. Conn., outpointed Ar
mand Savoie. 136. Montreal (10).
BROOKLYN.—Ted Olla. 163 >4. Mil
waukee. and Jessie Turner. 169. St.
! Louis, draw (10).
| LOS ANGELEB.—Dickie Wong, 141,
: Honolulu, outpointed Frankie Cockrell,
( 146. Los Angeles (10).
Tigers, 9-3; Sox, 1-2
FIRST GAME.
Detroit. A.H.O.A. Chicago. A.H.O.A.
! Kuenn.ss 1111 Car’quel.ss 4 0 0 1
Bertola.ss 2 0 0 2 Fox.2b 3 0 0 2
Ha’d,2b-3b 4 2 11 Minoso.cf 2 13 0
Nleman.lf 3 0 4 0 Rivera.rf 2 0 0 0
Bolling.2b 2 113 Mars’ll,rf 2 0 10
Boone.3b 3 113 Jackson.lb 4 2 12 0
Delsing.lf 2 10 0 Lollar.c 3 16 1
Belardi.lb 4 014 2 Strahs.p 0 0 0 0
Kaline.rf 43 2 0 2Cavar’ta 10 0 0
Tuttle.cf 3 10 0 Klrrene.3b 4 0 13
House.c 4 2 2 0 McGhee,lf 2 0 10
Garver.n 4 012 Keegan.p 2 0 11
ISawa’ki.c 10 2 1
Totals 36 12 27 14 Totals ”30 427 9
1 Struck out for Keegan In Bth.
2 Grounded out for Strahs in 9th.
Detroit 001 033 002—9
Chicago —. 000 000 100—1
Runs Kuenn, Hatfield. Bolling,
Boone, Kaline (2). Tuttle, House (2).
Jackson. Errors —Kuenn, McGhee. Runs
batted In—Kuenn. House. Hatfield. Ka-
Hne. Tuttle (2). Lollar, Delslng (2).
Two-base hits—Kaline. Boone, Lollar,
Delslng. Three-base hit—House. Home
run—Tuttle. Stolen bases - McGhee,
Jackson, Sacrifices —Fox. Belardl. Sacri
fice flv—Kuenn. Double plays—Lollar
to Kirrene: Belardl to Kuenn. Left on
bases—Detroit. 5: Chicago. 6. Bases on
balls—Off Keegan. 1: off Garver. 2: off
Strahs, l. Struck out —By Keegan. 5;
by Garver. 2: by Strahs, 2. Hits—Off
Keegan. 8 In 7 innings: off Strahs. 4
in 2 innings. Runs and earned run* —
Off Keegan, 7-6; off Strahs. 2-2. off
Garver. 1-1. Hit by pitcher—By Kee
kan (Hatfield), bv Garver (Minoso).
Winning pitcher—Garver (13-9). Los
ing pitcher—Keegan (15-8). Time—
-2:37.
SECOND GAME.
Detroit. A.H.O.A. Chicmro. A.H.O.A.
Kuenn.ss 63 3 4 Car’sq l.s* 40 4 4
Hatfleld.2b 4 12 3 Fox.2b 5 13 5
Nieman.lf 4 0 4 0 Mln so.lf.cf 5 14 0
Evers.lf 0 0 0 0 Marshail.rf 6 3 2 0
Boone.Ub 4 12 1 Jackson.lb 5012 0
Belardl.lb 4 0 5 0 Batts.c 5 4 2 0
Dropo.lb 00 2 1 SPlerce 00 0 0
Kaline.rf 4 110 Kirrene.3b 10 10
j Tuttle.cf 4 0 6 0 Marsh.3b 10 13
I Wilson.c 4 2 6 0 ICav’retta 10 0 0
! 4Bertola 0 0 0 0 Johnson.p 0 0 0 0
House.c 0 0 0 1 OLollar 0 0 0 0
Zuverink.p 4 10 1 McGhee.cf 3 0 10
Herbert.p 0 0 0 0 2Rlvera,lf’ 10 0 0
Aber.p 0 0 0 0 Trucks.p 3 2 0 1
3Ke11.3b 2 10 0
Total* 37 930 11 Totals 41 12 30 13
1 Grounded out for Marsh in Bth.
2 Walked for McGhee in Bth.
3 Hit into fnrceoutr for Truck* in Bth.
4 Ran for Wilson in 10th.
5 Ran for Batts in 10th.
6 Walked for Johnson In 10th.
Detroit 200 000 000 I—3
Chicago 001 000 001 o—2
Runs—Kuenn. Hatfield. Bertola. Car
raaquel, Minoso. Error—Hatfield. Runs
batted in—Hatfield. Boone. Marshall.
Minoso. Kuenn. Two-base hits—Kuenn.
Hatfield. Wilson (2). Batts (3). Three
base hit—Kuenn. Home run—Minoso.
Double playe Fox to Csirrasquel to
lacksen (2t. Left on bases—Detroit. 5:
1 Chicago, 13. Bases on balls—Off Trucks.
1; off Herbert. 1; off Zuverink. 1.
• Struck out—By Trucks, 1; by Zuverink.
5; by Johnson. 1. Hits—Off Trucks. 7
in 8 innings: off Zuverink. 11 in 9
innings (pitched to 1 man in 10th); off
Johnson. 2 in 2 Innings; off Herbert. 0
in A inning (pitched to 1 man); off Aber.
-1 in 1 inning. Runs and earned runs—
Off Trucks. 2-2; off Johson. 1-1; off
Zuverink. 2-2. Hit bv pitcher—ByZuver
lnk (Carrasquel. Kirrene). Winning
ance—l6.2s6.
K^butetu.
BEAT
MU Ely BURTON HAWKINS
Roy Mack, executive vice pres
ident of the Athletics, sat
through yesterday’s double
header at Griffith Stadium with
Gabe Murphy, /
ested in get- ■ mfjm
to unload his
it, Murpliy
said, “All. I Bortan Hawkins.
can say is that Mr. and Mrs. Roy
Mack and their son Connie were
down for lunch and we had a
discussion. Aside from that I
can’t say anything.” .. . Murphy,
who is said to' have sat in on
previous conferences with Roy,
has turned down offers for his
Senators’, stock and has told
friends he’ll continue to hang
on to it.
So far the Athletics have been
able to produce plenty of well
! healed men willing to pour
I money into the club, but none
has been mutually acceptable to
the feuding brothers, Roy and
Earle Mack. . . . John McShain,
wealthy construction figure, is
willing to take over the A’s but
! only if Earle severs all connec
tion with the team.
** * *
Murphy may be in the middle
of the muddle simply as adviser
to R0y.... But Gable also has at
tended numerous major league
meetings since acquiring Wash
ington stock from John Jachym
and could be chafing to get into
action. . . . The A’s setup would
give him that opportunity if he
Tough to Leave/ Ted Says
Williams Likely to Be Back,
Despite Avowals He's Through
By the Associated Press i
NEW YORK, Sept. 7.—Ted
Williams is expected to be back j
hammering home runs for the
Boston Red Sox next season de
spite repeated declarations this
would be his last year.
Baseball’s greatest hitter is
ready and even eager to quit.
He has said this was his last
season and if he had to make an
on-the-spot decision today, he’d
probably say: “This is it. I’m
through.”
But his friends, his teammates,
his employer, manager and even
his enemies won’t let him.
Baseball people, high up in
official capacity, have pleaded
with Williams to play at least
one more year. They have told
him he still is the greatest hitter
in the game and it would be a
shame for him to quit now.
Now He’s Undecided.
Williams, always an easy mark
for a plea for help despite his
brash exterior, is undecided as
to what to do despite his state
ment to newsmen yesterday he
was through after this year.
It was a tired and disgusted
Williams who made that state
ment to newsmen in the Red Sox
clubhouse after enjoying one of
his greatest batting days at Yan
tick Resigns as Coach
Ai Army Navy Club
Peter Fick, formerly the
“world’s fastest swimmer” and
holder of many national, Olym
pic and world records, has an
nounced “with reluctance” the
end of his tenure as swimming
professional at Army Navy
Country Club, where he has
taught many hundreds of young
sters in the last three years.
Fick, a native of Philadelphia,
who has divided his time be
tween Miami and the Army
Navy Club, Is transferring to the
Golden Gate on Miami Beach
on a year-’round basis, he an
nounced, No successor has been
chosen at the nearby Virginia
service club.
Leßruce Chapter Wins
Track, Swim Titles
Robert Leßruce chapter came
home from the DeMolay Mary
land State Conclave in Balti
more yesterday with two cham
pionships and a runnerup trophy
tucked away.
Led by Tremaine Finch, the
Washington chapter grabbed 11
of 12 first places for the track
title. Finch won the 100 and
220 yard dashes, the high jump
and the shot put. Joe Morris
won three events to pace Robert
Leßruce to the swimming cham
pionship. Robert Leßruce was
runnerup to Cumberland in bas
ketball.
Senators' Records
AB R H 2b 3b HR RBI Pet.
Dietzel 7 n 3 0 <> 0 1 .429
Old Is 22 17 1 0 0 0 .318
Killebrew 13 1 4 1 0 0 3 .308
Vernon 536 89163 33 14 20 92 .304
Busby 555 77 167 16 5 7 71 .301
FitzG’id 306 28 89 II 3 4 34 .291
Runnels 434 68 117 13 15 3 45 .270
Yost 508 98133 28 411 46 .262
Lemon 58 4 15 2 2 0 0 .259
VoUmer 117 8 30 3 0 2 15 .256
Pesky 175 21 43 4 4 1 10 .246
Wright. 159 11 38 4 3 1 15 .239
3ievtrs. 462 69 110 22 523 97 .238
Snyder. 191 13 23 3 0 0 12 .228
Tipton -153 9 34 4 11 9 .222
Paul* 9 0 23 3 0 0 2 .222
Umph’tt 335 20 74 8 3 1 32 .221
r’wii’ger 302 40 62 9 1 3 23 .205
McDer’H 87 0 16 3 0 0 4 .184
Btobbs . 42 4 6 1 0 0 2 .143
I Pascual 21 2 3 0 1 0 0 .143
, Fchmitz 5 1 6 7 0 0 o 0 .137
I stone 42 4 4 11 0 5 .095
Port erf d 80 3 6 0 0 0 4 .075
Ker’zakos 15 0 1 0 0 0 0 .067
Shea 18 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Marrero 16 1 0 0 0 0 0 .900
Levan 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 .(KM)
Korcheck. 3 <> o o 0 0 0 .000
PITCHING.
IP H BBSOOSGGW L
Bchmlt* 165 155 54 53 20 li 10 7
Stone 147 142 68 64 18 710 8
Porterfield .. 223 209 61 75 29 19 13 I'’
Stobbs 153 172 56 60 21 8 810
Keriazako* .. 59 52 29 32 3 2 2 3
Pascual 98 112 53 47 4 1 3 6
Marrero ... 64 70 22 28 71 8 0
j McDermott.. 174 148 87 86 23 10 7 13
I Em":::: 5115 S 8 So if
A A
i *
prefers to abandon the passive
role he has played with the
akiators. ... But it’s difficult to
vision Murphy, a Washingtonian
with an insurance business and
showplace residence here, shift
ing to -Philadelphia.
Pitcher Alex Kellner of the
A’s has returned to Philadelphia
for treatment of a sore left
shoulder.... It’s so painful Alex
says he can’t sleep and bursitus
is feared. ... In his last five
games against the Senators.
Spook Jacobs of the A’s has stol
en nine bases in as many at
tempts. . . . Four of those have
been against Gus Keriazakos,
Whose slow motion delivery in
vites thefts.
** * *
Add historical notes: Carlos
Paula became the f\jst Negro to
play in a regular game for Wash
ington in the first game of yes
terday’s double-header. ... In
the same contest Outfielder Gus
Zemial played first base for the
first time Bleacher fans have
been Invited into the grandstand
because of rain, but yesterday
was the first time they’ve been
given the okay to get in out of
the sun. . . . Many of them pre
ferred to stay there and be
baked.
The Athletics, Indians and Red
Sox have belted 13 home runs
each against the Senators, with
the Yankees getting 12, White
Sox 10, Tigers 9 and Orioles 1.
... The Senators need 9,131 cus
tomers in. their last four home
games to reach an attendance
figure of 500,000.
If the Senators should sweep
their remaining three games
with the Yankees it would give
them a split for the season with
New York. . . . Pop may remem
ber when they last enjoyed that
sensation. ... The Senators need
nine more home runs to set a
club record.
kee Stadium. He was slowly
dragging his soaking uniform off
his weary body when reporters
asked him whether he had i
changed his mind about quitting.!
“Not a bit,” he barked. “No
more baseball for me after this j
year. To heck with it. I know ’
when I’ve got enough. I’m
through.”
At the time he said it, Wil
liams meant every word. Handi
capped by a still mending left
collarbone fracture and retard
ed by a long siege of flu during
June, s Williams is exhausted
physically.
Complains of Aches.
As hte wearily climbed into his
street clothes hours after the
six-hour double-header against
the Yankees—during which he
banged a triple, double and four
singles—Williams, 36, complain
ed of aches and pains.
“Gosh, but Im tired, he
groaned. “Those feet are killing
me. And my back hurts like
blazes. The legs are all right,
but those feet. The ground out
there was as hard as a rock.
And I have to play every inning
of both games. I just can’t do
that any more. Not at my age.
I wanted to get taken out about
midway in the second game, but,
when we rallied to tie the score
and'then went ahead, I really
wanted to stay in these.”
It was then that he repeated
his intention to quit.
Tough to Leave.
Hours later, fully refreshed,
Williams was discussing his
baseball status with a friend.
“It’s going to be tough to have
to leave baseball,” he said whim
j sically. “There’s nothing that
| can equal it. This game always
has something new to offer you.
You never know what to expect
from it. It never stops giving
you thrills. I guess that’s why
it’s such a great game.”
Williams’ surge has placed him
back in the running for the
league batting championship.
With 18 games left, he has 321
at bats and a .358 average, 21
points ahead of Bobby Avila, the
leader.
At the iate he’s going, Wil
liams figures to wind up with
about 380 at bats, 20 short of
the required 400. However, if
he maintains his present margin,
he may win the crown under
the exception to the 400 rule.
Own A
FORD?
We need Fords for buyers
right away It’ll pay you
to get our big trade-in
before you trade.
Arlington
MOTOR CO., INC.
Open 'till 9 P.M Week Nltes
•1917 N Monroe Street
JA 7-8787
Arllnrten. Va
SINCE 1913
WE SUPPLY
INNER-TUBES for
TUBELESS TIRES
i&effifitoi.
1220 13fh St. N.W. ME. 8-0763
Daily, 8 to 8} Sat., 8 to 2:30
Win in Southern 500
Gives Herb Thomas
Point Standings Lead
By th* Associated Brass
DARLINGTON. S. C.. Sept. 7.
A record-smashing victory in
yesterday’s Southern 500 strictly
stock car race here vaulted Herb
Thomas of Sanford, N. C., from
third to first place in the Na
tional Association of Stock Car
Racing point standings.
His second win in the annual
event was good for 1,500 points.
This gave him a total of 6,560 .
and put him well ahead of Lee
Petty of Greensboro, N. C., the
former leader who failed to in-;
crease his 5,534. ,
Thomas, defending NASCAR
point champion, turned in an%
official recortj speed of 94.93f|
miles an hour to become them;
first two-time Southern 500 win
ner. He also won in 1951.
Last year’s speed and previous
record was 92.78.
Thomas drove a 1954 Hudson
et a stirring stretch duel with
urtis Turner, wealthy Roanoke,
Va.. sportsman who led for more
than SOO of the 364 laps in a
1952 Oldsmobile.
Turner, still ahead at the 344th
lap, was passed by Thomas when
he m*de a pit stop. He couldn’t
makq up the three laps lost al
though he was flagged only sec
onds After Thomas crossed the
finish line.
Third place fell to Marvin
Panch of Oakland, Calif., even
though Petty drovfe his 1954
Dodge. They switched cars after
about one-third of the race.
Thomas started out in 23d
position. Turner was six places
ahead of him.
The first 10 finishers and their
winnings, exclusive of lap prizes:
, Thomas, $6,400; Turner, $3,-
475; Panch, $1,925; Johnny Pat
terson, Huntington, W. Va.,
driving a 1954 Mercury, $1,125;
Jim Paschal, High Point, N. C.,
1954 Dodge, $825; Fireball Rob
erts, Daytona Beach, Fla., 1953
Oldsmobile, $700; Gwen Staley,
North Wilkesboro, N. C., 1954
Cadillac, $650; Joe Million, Rich
mond, Ky., 1953 Oldsmobile,
$600; Laird Bruner, Somerset,
Pa., Oldsmobile, SSOO.
26 Matches on Tap
In Edgemoor Tennis
The Edgemoor invitation ten
nis tournament swung into full
i activity today as 26 men’s singles
j matches were to be played be
: tween 10:30 a.m. and dark.
| In opening matches yesterday,
! Bob Haller defeated Bill Grady,
9—7, 6—l; Richard Breuer
bumped John Howe, 6—l, 6—l,
and Earl Brown ousted Gil
Sward, 6 —3, 6—3.
Pairings:
Class B; 10:30 a.m.—Peter Dell vs.
Richard Breuer. 3:30 p.m.—M. A. Erana
vs. Don Schweitzer. 4:30 p.m.—Hugh
Lynch 111 vs. Jack Connally. Jack Nor
throp vs. James Murray. Dick Lane vs.
Bill Strawlnski. Kim Valentine vs. Earl
! Brown. 5:30 p.m.—Dick Simpson vs.
I Tony Arzalem. Nell Krucoff vs. Tom
i Freeman. James Free vs. Louis Clabeck. .
! 6:30 p.m.—Alan Smith vs. BUI Ferris.
I Steve Benedict vs. Steve Barnoff. A1 Lu
lark vs. Tom Beall. Edwin Ihrlg vs. Dick
Sherman.
I Class A: Noon —John Myer* v*. Tom
! Reel. 3 p.m.-r-John Harris v*. Leif
| Beck. 4:30 p.m.—Lindy Kehoe vs. John
] Terry, Don Ralph vs. Clyde Freeman,
i Rod Nichols vs. Courtland Ferguson.
! 5:30 p.m.—Dinny Barnes vs. Tom Brad
ford. Fred Dyer vs. Bob Davis. Bill Fer
ris vs. Larry Mlddlecamp. Bob Marzke
vs. Vladimer Grlnloff. Jack Staton vs.
Jack Ransohoff. 6:30 p.m.—Charles
Channing vs. Ernie Ingram. Dean Boor
man vs. Sam Kristofits, Stuart Robinson
vs. Mike Boteler.
m •
# •
* be COOL In * •
* Philadelphia •
* 375 Bedrooms, •
* Mac* Studio Type. \W
* Restaurants mi
* Public Rooms *•
* •AIR CONDITIONED**
The lUarunch
LOCUST AT SEVENTEENTH
Teletype PH376
Convenient
Auto Parking Facilities
* • A Kirkeki Hate! *• • •
Can Maryland repaat as
the Nation’s best? Is
Duke a Conferenee ,
threat?
Last year the Terps were
ranked first in the coun
try. Can they do it again?
Will Maryland—or Duke
top the Atlantic Coast
Conference?, Fred Russell
gives the lowdown on
Maryland In this week’s
Saturday Evening Post.
Get your copy today!

xml | txt