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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 03, 1955, Image 69

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‘THE SUNDAY STAR, Washington, D. C.
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SETS A RECORD AND MISSES A DREAM—Austin,
Tex.—Wes Santee, the great miler from Kansas,
streaks across the tape in the fastest time ever re
corded by an American yesterday at the Texas Relays.
Santee was clocked in 4:00.5, one-tenth of a second
faster than his own previous American record, and
just a half-a-second off his long-cherished dream of a
4-minute mile. Story on Page C-I.—AP Wirephoto.
District CYO Girls Win
2 Mid-Atlantic Titles
WILMINGTON. Del., April’ 2
(Special).—Washington grabbed
two championships and four sec
onds in the sixth annual Middle
Atlantic Catholic Youth Organi
zation Basketball Tournament
here today.
It marked the first time in
the history of the event that
one of the four competing cities
had a team in all six final games.
Washington’s two winners were
St. Ann’s in the junior girls
and Blessed Sacrament in the
intermediate girls and boosted
the Capital City’s title record to
13. Philadelphia has won eight
championships. Baltimore and
Wilmington are the other cities
who send representatives each
year.
Carol Jones scored 12 points
to lead St. Annss to its junior
girls’ title, 23-10, over St. Eliza
beth’s of Baltimore.
Margaret Cook scored 9 points
to lead Blessed Sacrament over
Holy Spirit of Philadelphia,
Carter-Zulueta Fight Here
Will Be Non-TitleAffair
Lightweight Champion Jimmy
Carter and Challenger Orlando
Zulueta of Cuba, who fight at
Uline Arena April 20, both,
scored notable successes when
they last showed in Washington.
Carter worked for Promoter
Goldie Ahearn, who is putting on
the April 20 bout, when he came
here for a show back in 1947,
while Zulueta showed under the
auspices of Gabe Menendez at
Turner’s Arena in 1952.
The Carter-Zulueta fight will
be a non-title affair' for tele
vision. Ahearn was unsuccessful
in his attempts to get Carter to
risk the title, he said by phone
yesterday from New York.
Ahearn recalls that he first
brought Carter to Washington
NOOERN FOOD DETJULHC
OFFERS
INTERESTING CAREER
In food retailing—as in most fields—a man begins his career in a job where
he can get basic, first-hand knowledge of how the business operates. At
Safeway, the best place to gain this basic knowledge is in a starting position
as a food clerk. Food retailing is one of the few fields where a broad, non
specialized background is a help to a young man, rather than a handicap.
From food clerk to store manager, each job is a well-paid educational course—
with on-the-job and group instruction designed to broaden the employe’s skills.
A Safeway career demands a lot, as well as having a lot to offer. It calls for
skill in meeting people, energy to keep pace in a fast-moving field, the
imagination of better ways of doing things, and one that calls for organizing
abilities. It offers young men a chance to learn a vital, interesting business as
they move up the ladder into a wide variety of jobs.
In this area, food clerks earn $3,387 to $4,063 a year. If they make good
in store management, they can earn from $5,980 to more than $12,000 a year
as a manager.
In addition, a career with Safeway offers pleasant working conditions, pleasant
people to work with, health and life insurance, permanent employment, paid
vacation, credit nnion facilities, a retirement program and profit-sharing
opportunities for eligible career employes.
If yon are looking for a career in this challenging field, yon are invited to
talk it over with our employment representative, between the hours of 8:30 *
and 3:00, Monday thrn Friday.
SAFEWAY STORES, INC.
1404 NEW YORK AVE. N.W.
(lend Building)
1 \
! | 33-22, for the intermediate girls
11 title.
, ( Dot Furey scored 26 points,
,j high for the game, but it wasn’t
enough, as her Blessed Sacra
ment team lost to St. Katherine’s
' | of Philadelphia, 66-57, in the
senior girls finals.
St. Hedwig of Wilmington won
two boys titles, beating St. Ga
-1 briel’s, 51-33, in the junior divi-
I sion and whipping St. Michael’s,
50-35, for the intermediate title.
! Mack Shriver and Butch Shee
han were high for St. Gabriel’s
with 10 r***nts each, while Don
Mudd led St. Michael’s with 12
points.
St. Laurence of Philadelphia
edged St. Ann’s, 54-52, for the
senior boys title. Bernie Mc-
Carthy was high for St. Ann’s
with 18 points. St. Ann’s was
without the services of one of its
stars. Bob Rusevlyan, who plays
for the Maryland University
football team which wound up
practice with its annual alumni
game yesterday.
i
’ when Carter was a comparative
i unknown for a fight against
Sandy Saddler at Griffith Sta
dium. June 3. 1947. Saddler was
the big name in that match and
a 3-1 favorite, but Carter showed
his class by holding Saddler to
a draw.
Zulueta, the colorful but un
predictable Cuban who now is
rated ninth among Carter’s
challengers, also was just one
of the boys when he visited
Turner s Arena for a 1952 bout
against Marshall Clayton. Clay
ton, former Army champion, was
getting a big local buildup at
the time and was a big favorite
over Zulueta.
Zulueta won a split decision,
however, to help burst the Clay
ton bubble.
I Syracuse lops
I Pistons, Takes
J 2-0 Series Lead
| SYRACUSE, N. Y„ April 2 (JP).
I —Red Rocha’s long set shot with
1 seconds remaining cut short a
I Fort Wayne rally and gave the
" Syracuse Nationals an 87-84 vic
tory over the Pistons for a 2-0
. lead in the National Basketball
* ■ Association's final playoff in War
I Memorial Auditorium today.
The- victory kept Intact the
I Nationals’ record of having never
I been beaten by Fort Wayne on
K i their home court. It was their
I j 19th win over the Pistons at
1 home
:J Brian Helps In Win
Frank Brian personally made
I the Nats’ victory a close one.
I With two minutes to go he nar-
I rowed the gap to two points, 83-
I 81. Then, after Dolph Schayes
I had dropped in two free throws
I to widen the gap to four points
I again. Brian made good on one
I shot from the free throw line
I and seconds later added a field
I goal. The clock showed 30 sec-
I onds remaining.
The Nationals played posses-
I ! sion ball for most of the 24 sec
| onds allowed a team before a
| shot must be taken Then Rocha
let fly from some 30 feet out.
i The ball dropped through cleanly
, to clinch the victory.
Schayes led the scoring with 24
points. Fort Wayne’s George
Yardley had 21 and Brian 20.
I Shifts to Indianapolis
The series now shifts to Indi
anapolis, where the teams meet
tomorrow night. Syracuse has -
now beaten the Pistons 9 out of
14 games this season.
The Nationals led by seven
points at the end of the first
quarter. Then they hit for 12 of
24 field goal tries in the second
. to make the halftime edge 49-38.
The Pistons took the lead on a
short set shot by Brian midway
through the quarter and ended
the period leading 65-63.
JT* yne O-F.Pt«. SyrmeMc G.F.Pts.
Hutchins 6 31* Schayes 710 24
Meineke 15 7 Rocha 4 3 11
Yardley 7 721 Lloyd 1 3. 4
Rosenthal 10 2 Kerr 8 117
Foust 2 0 4 Tucker I 0 2
i ■ SSH?,"** 3J 3 Seymour «3 is
Zaslofsky 32 o S Parley ii ;
• Waftner 00 "o Osterkorn 10 2
’ Totals 31 22 84 Totals "33 21 87
: SANTEE
i Continued from Page C-l
. time would be “about 4:01 or
. 4:02.” Wes said he probably
, would try again for the four
minute mile at the Kansas Re
lays three weeks hence "if the
; weather’s nice.”
The temperature of 80 degrees
: here today was to his liking, but
he said the wind blew stronger
than he had expected. A north
!. wind of 4 miles per hour had
been announced earlier.
Bobby Morrow Outstanding
Santee's was one of 12 Texas
relays records set during the two
day meet.
Despite this tremendous effort,
Santee had to relinquish the
honor of outstanding performer
which he had received here the
. past two years.
The award went to Bobby
Morrow of Abilene Christian
College for anchoring the Wild
cats to new Texas relays records
in the 440 and 880-yard delays,
college division, after taking first
place in the 100-yard dash in
the university-college competi
tion.
Morrow’s time in the 100 was
9.8.
While Santee and Morrow
were wowing the crowd with
their individual brilliance, Okla
homa A&M’s Cowpokes walked
off with the unofficial team
championship. They had 108%
points to 80 for Texas, the near
est competitor.
SOCCER TITLE TO MITCHELL
Mitchell’s. Hardware won the
Bi-County Soccet League cham
pionship yesterday by defeating
Silver Springs, 3-2, in the final
playoff game at Twenty-fourth
street and Constitution avenue
N.W.
FINAL RACE SLATED TODAY
Middies Take Lead
In McMillan Regatta
ANNAPOLIS, April 2 (&}<—
Naval Academy yachtmen were j
anything but obliging hosts to
day, jumping into a 1V« point i
lead at the end of the first race
in the annual McMillan Cup
regatta.
Nine other schools are com
peting in the 44-foot yawl
classic, a highlight of the inter
collegiate racing season.- The
event is sponsored by the Inter- j
collegiate Yacht Racing Associa
tion.
The Navy sailors, who com
pleted the 19-mile course in An
napolis Harbor Channel in three
hours 42 minutes, finished only
28 seconds ahead of Brown.
The second of the two races
will be sailed over the same i
course tomorrow. i
Point totals at this stage are:
Navy 11%, Brown 10, Babson 9 f <
Princeton 8, Harvard 7, MIT 6, :
COAST-IN^PONTIAC'S
j OHM TODAY I SUNDAY, All PAY I
pt \ WE w|u - m you
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I Title and Dealt ■RE ■■ rTTWIIHiI Washington's No. 1 Pontiac Dealer
17. We Will Make bp g|| 1 Not Only In Washington
I and Deliver** But Soon On The Entire East Coast
EOSI COAST-IN PONTIAC
407 FLORIDA AVE. N.E. • OPEN TO 9 P.M.
Pennsylvania 5, New York State
j Maritime College 4, Cornell 3
j and Rhode Island 2.
j The scoring system allows one
point for starting, one for finish- j
ing and one for each yawl beat
en. The winning craft is award
ed an extra one-fourth point.
The McMillan Cup series was
inaugurated in 1931 with the
donation of the trophy by Hugh
! McMillan of Princeton and Balti- !
more. The trophy was donated
specifically for large yacht com
petition.
Most intercollegiate sailing j
competition is in 12-foot ding
hies.
The series was suspended after
World War II because a one- j
design large boat fleet was not |
available.
In 1949 the Naval Academy j 1
offered the use of its 44-foot!
yawls for the series. The first
Loyola Beats CU
In Tennis Opener
Loyola of Baltimore opened
the Mason-Dixon Conference
tennis season by defeating Cath
olic University, the defending
conference champion, 6-3, at CU
yesterday.
Joe Lorenz, the only holdover
from last year on Catholic’s six
man team, won his 15th straight
match, defeating S. Chard of
; Loyola, 6 —2, 6 —o. Lorenz was
undefeated in 14 matches last
season.
Singles—W. Halley 'Loyola) defeated
B. Edmonds (CU) 6 —l. <>—o: 8. Dixon
(Loyola i defeated M. O'Connor (CU)
6—3. 6—2; J. Lorenz (CU) defeated 8.
: Chard (Loyola) 6—2. 6—o; P. Lefevre I
(CU) defeated B. O’Connor (Loyola) j
j 6~3. L Delgado (CU) defeated i
! J. Cummings (Loyola) 6—2, 6—l: M. j
Mohler (Loyola) defeated J. Wholey j
! (CU) fl—7. 60. .
Doubles—Halley and Dixon (Loyola) j
defeated Edmonds and M. O'Connor <CU)
1 6—l. fl—2: B. O’Connor and Mohler
1 (Loyola) defeated Lorenz and Wholey
i (CU) 6—l. 4—6, 9—7: Chard and
Cummings (Loyola) defeated Delgado and
| Lefevre (CU) 2—6, 6—4. 6—l.
i ■■■ ■ - ---- : ■ =
postwar series was held here dur
ing the spring of 1950 and has
been an annual event ever since.
Assignment of yawls was made <
by drawing lots.
Last year’s winner was Cornell,
which edged out MIT. 1
Terps Beat Dartmouth
In Lacrosse Opener
• Maryland, which expects to
bid strongly for the intercol
■ legiate lacrosse title this year,
opened its season with a 16-6
; victory over Dartmouth yester
,l day at College Park,
i j The defeat was the third for
the Big Green in four starts, j
Dartmouth defeated Adelphi, !
but lost to Princeton and Hos-!
1 1 stra.
j Maryland scored six times
! before Dartmouth took a shot,
which was good and made the
score 6-1 after 9 minutes. The
Terps led 9-3 at halftime.
The Terps’ attack, which ap
pears to be their strong point,
was led by Charles Wicker, a
third-string All-American last
year, who had seven assists and
j two goals, and Jim Strott with |
j five goals.
Clem Malin, goalie for Dart- j
1 mouth, held the score down with 1
,27 saves. Both Maryland goalies
only had nine.
Maryland plays Princeton
Wednesday. Harvard Thursday,
and Williams Saturday, all at
College Park.
Dartmaith. M»ryl»»4.
Stivent 8
8 “tbss:
! Anderson MP McNichol**
Snencer MP Oorertem filer
| Chandler MP Wietch#
Lenhard A Btrott
! Benisch A Smith
Champion A Wicker
i Dartmouth l C l 2<l
Maryland . 7 2 3 4—IS
Scoring: Maryland—Smith, McNicho
las 2, Keatlnr 3. Btrott 5. Wicker 2,
Bromwell. Corriaan 2. Dartmouth—
Lenhard 3, Anderson. Benisch 2.
DINNER HONORS BOATMEN
A testimonial dinner, attended
by about 150. was tendered Rus
sell P. Nicholson last night at
i the Old Dominion Boat Club in
Alexandria on his retirement
I after 24 years as secretary
treasurer of the boat club.

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