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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 13, 1955, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1955-04-13/ed-1/seq-5/

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DOCTOR’S PROUD PARENTS—New York.—Mr. and Mrs.
Daniel Salk, parents of Dr. Jonas A. Salk, register pleasure on
hearing of their son’s success with polio vaccine.
MOTHER WEEPS WITH JOY
Dr. Salk's Parents Knew
Their Sod Wouldn't Fail
NEW YORK, April 13 UP). —
The proud parents of Dr. Jonas
E. Salk said yesterday they knew
his polio vaccine would be a
sucoess when he inoculated his
own wife and three sons more
than a year ago.
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Salk
heard the official report by ra
dio in their five-room apart
ment.
The white-haired mother, Dora,
65. wept with joy.
The father, Daniel, 65, a re
tired designer of women’s neck
wear and blouses, commented:
“We were not surprised. We
saw this coming.”
The mother added:
“We knew for some time, for
a year and a half. When he
inoculated the vaccine in his own
family, that was the proof. My
son would never do anything he
was not sure of.”
Interrupted constantly by con
gratulatory telephone calls from
relatives and friends, the father
said:
“I have no words. I Just feel
great.”
No Polio in Family
He said nobody in the Salk
family ever had polio. The son’s
Interest in the disease developed
from his interest in Influenza
virus.
The parents said their son
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wanted to become a doctor ever
since he attended Townsend
Harris High School in New
York.
“His first and last ambition
was to be a doctor and to go
into science,” the father recalled.
To a newsman’s question as
to whether the son always had
been studious, the father said:
“He spent a lot of time over
the books, but would take time
out for tennis.”
Did the parents have any spe-
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famed doctor and his two young
er brothers?
“My wife gave them every op
portunity,” said the father. “They
got the schooling we failed to
get.”
The doctor lived with his par
ents in the apartment west of
Central Park until he was mar
ried 16 years ago to the former
Donna Lindsay.
Dr. Salk, his wife and their
three boys, Peter, 11; Darrell, 7:
and Jonathan, 5, now make their
home in the Squirrel Hill sec
tion of Pittsburgh.
Brothers Are Doctors
The doctor’s two brothers are
Dr. Herman M. Salk, of Palm
Springs, Calif., a veterinarian
and Dr. Lee Salk a psychologist,
who is teaching and doing re
search at McGi.l University,
Montreal.
Dr. Jonas Salk, who is 40 and
now heads the University of
Pittsburgh virus research labo
ratory, entered City College of
New York at the age of 15, work
ing summers as a boys’ camp
counselor and later as a labora
tory technician.
He was graduated in 1934 and
studied medicine at New York
University, where he won suc
cessive fellowships in chemistry,
experimental surgery and bac
teriology.
Dr. Salk got, his M.D. in 1939
and interned at Mount Sinai
Hospital, New York.
Liked Research
He always leaned toward re
search, beginning work on the
influenza virus while a medical
student. He picked it up again
in 1942 when awarded a fellow
ship at the University of
Michigan.
Along with one of his teachers.
Dr Thomas Francis, jr.—who
evaluated trials of the polio vac
cine—Dr. Salk developed a com
mercial flu vaccine now on the
market.
Dr. Salk went to Pitt in 1947
and continued his flu studies for
a while before moving into the
polio field. He financed his work
through grants from the Na
tional Foundation for Infantile
Paralysis.
Dr. Salk hasn’t had much time
to spend with his wife and sons.
“Not nearly enough time,” he
emphasizes.
Hobbies?
“My work is a very fine hobby,”
says Dr. Salk.
Polio in D. C. Killed 104,
1,584 Coses Since 'l2
Success of the Salk polio vac
cine gave hope today of wiping
out a small but relentless death
toll and a larger number o's
crippling cases recorded in the
District’s medical history. ,
Since 1912, when the Health
Department began keeping tab,
a total of 104 deaths of persons
living in the District has been
ascribed to the disease. Over the
same 42-year period, 1,584 cases
of polio were reported here.
While the District situation
never has been acute compared
with some other parts of the
Nation, the threat always has
been present.
In 1944, the severest year na
tionally, 11 persons died in the
District from among the 194
cases reported. The following
year there were nine deaths
from 145 cases.
For the past five years, a total
of 535 cases and 13 deaths have
been reported The, severest
years were 1950, with 184 cases
and 5 deaths, and 1952, with
135 cases and the same number
of deaths.
In a recent study of polio rec
ords for the past seven years,
the Health Department disclosed
that of a total of 777 reported
cases, 329 were said to be of
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the paralytic type. Os these pa
tients, a considerable number
suffered Impairments possibly
for life.
Classification of the 777 cases
by age groups showed that the
disease, while relatively light
here, struck children and adults
of all ages. For example, 272 of
the cases were recorded for chil
dren under 6 years, or school age.
Salk Sees Mental Ills
Yielding to Preventives
ANN ARBOR, Mich., April 13
UP, —Dr. Jonas E. Salk, who de
veloped the Salk vaccine against
polio, agrees that mental dis
ease should be the next major
target of preventive medicine.
Dr. Salk, interviewed by CBS
Commentator Edward R. Mur
row over the "Se It Now” tele
vision program last night, said:
. . The area of mental dis
ease is one of the largest by far
and particularly desperately in
need of quantitative measures
that tell us precisely what we
are dealing with, so that we can
measure the dynamics of the
process as we have tried to de
termine the dynamics of the in
fectious diseases.”
Polio Strikes Three
On Ship, Kills One
NORFOLK, Vs, April 13 UP.
—One member of the crew of
the aircraft carrier Lake Cham
plain has died of polio and two
other crew members have the
disease, a spokesman for Atlan
tic Fleet headquarters said yes
terday.
One of the ill crew members
is still aboard the Lake Cham
plain. The other man was re
moved at Gibraltar and was
taken to a hospital in French
Morocco, the fleet spokesman
said. t
He reported that John Melvin
Barr, boatswain’s mate seaman,
of Aroma Park, HI, died yester
day when the carrier was ap
proximately 1,000 miles east of
Bermuda. His death came short
ly before a Norfolk-based plane
delivered two iron lungs to the
Lake Champlain.
The man still aboard the ship
was identified as Paul Edward
Bilbo, seaman, of Bryantville,
Mass. His condition was de
scribed as “good.”
Transferred to the hospital in
Morocco was Walter Park Run
yon, ship’s serviceman 3/c, of
Red Bank, N. J. His condition
was described as “not Improved.”
CANCER VICTIM
WILLS $35,000
TO POLIO FUND ,
SYRACUSE. N. Y. UP.—
The *35.000 estate of Theo
dore Neshkoff, who died Sun
day, goes to the March of
Dim>3s “for the use of chil
dren crippled by Infantile
jferalysis.” He had been ill'
with lung cancer.
, Mr. Neshkoff, a 73-year
old retired laborer, said in
his wfll that he had “no
relative* and no intimate
friends." " . ~
The will was offered for
probate yesterday—the day
the Salk polio vaccine was
pronounced a success. ,
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A-5
THE EVENING STAR
Washington D C
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