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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 16, 1955, Image 14

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' the EVENING STAR, Washington, D. C.
mtiiimt, ma it. i*s»
THE PASSING SHOW
India Sends 'Chandra/
A DeMille-Size Film
' BY JAY CARMODY
India, which has a large and flourishing motion picture in
dustry, has sent us a lavish sample of its cinema product in
'‘Chandra," which opened yesterday at the Little Theater.
This is a DeMilie-size (larger than "king”) epic, extravagant
in its every dimension and pulsating with color. Its cast is huge,
including India's outstanding
performers of both sexes and an
impressive collection of Nautch
dancers.
Prom these specifications, you
may gather that the conventions
of Hollywood have profoundly
influenced the producers of
"Chandra.”
Superficially, at least, this is
a sound judgment which leaves
India’s candidate for interna
tional cinema honors—and prof
its—more appealing to western
curiosity than exciting in its
drama. There is no denying,
however, that the film’s land
scape has about it a notable
quality of visual splendor.
Its settings are palaces,
temples, bazaars and other aus
tere or teeming centers of orien
tal life that are not available
to western film makers, and, in!
consequence, have a special
Quality of drama.
Nevertheless, for all its accent j,
cn spectacle, “Chandra” is a
story film. It is a historic melo
drama which reaches far back
into Indian mythology to tell the i
story of one of the country’s early j
heroines. This is a girl who is as
politically and militarily astute:
as she is attractive and courage- j
ous in person.
That she lived in a dawn so
far antecedent to anything re
sembling our own makes her
more startling than comprehen
sible to western moviegoers. The
producers 9t "Chandra” appar
ently anticipated this which in
spired them to present the pic
ture in English, a helpful gesture
but a not altogether successful
one.
"Chandra,” therefore, remains!
a film whose appeal will be to;
those seeking the special cinema!
entertainment, a westernized ■
eastern which may be a presage
of Indian films to come. As so
many have gome from other,
nearer lands in the internation
alization of film exhibition.
** * *
THE SWITCH: Hollywood,
which only yesterday—a longish
ago yesterday—was wondering
how it could possibly live with
television, might well begin to
wonder how it could live with
out it.
If the present trend continues,
the folk speech might even come
up with an expression: “Oh. I
decided to skip the telecast and
wait for the movie."
If, and when, this happens, it
will be an outgrowth of the movie
6tudios’ sudden hunger to buy
television scripts for Cinema
scope enlargement. The cur
rently most-talked-of new film
release, if you didn't know, is
"Marty” which was taken from j
a video play written by Paddy!
HOLLYWOOD FI
By SHIILAH GRAHAM jOP
Piper-Schine Romance Warm
HOLLYWOOD.
Piper Laurie has come a long
way from eating flowers for
publicity to a marriage license i
with the very wealthy David '
Schtoie. She’ll more or less .give
up her movie career after the
marriage.
MGM is holding “Green Man- i
gions” for Pier Angeli, until :
after the baby. That’s nice for
her—and for them. . . . Jack
Benny and Lucille Ball are trad
ing guest shots on each other’s
show. . . . John Agar, now very,
serious about his career, will do j
a “Climax” on CBS week after
next.
There will soon be a very fas
cinating announcement from
Bing Crosby. . . . Gregory Peck
has started a racing stable. I
hope he knows as much about
horses as women in general
would like to know about him.
Greg is leading a very quiet life,
Just dating Veronica Passani.
** * *
Bob Aldrich has a new system
for shooting “The Big Knife”— i
14 days of rehearsing with Jack j
Palance, Shelley Winters and
Ida Lupir.o, and then only 15
days to shoot.
Jerry Lewis, discussing the
new flood of rumors of a feud
with partner Dean Martin: “I
buried three in my family this;
past year. Everything else seems
a little bit trite.”
Six-year-old Porty Mason
turned down the Baby Spooks
role on TV because of the working
hours —40 a week at the rate of
eight a day. And ldt’e face it,
her parents, Pamela and James
Mason, do not need the money.
James is currently corralling
$2,500 a week as host of Lux
Video. And “A Star Is Born" j
added $400,000 to the family
bankroll.
** * *
Silver Screen is chortling be
cause of the Grace Kelly cover,
picked two months before Oracle
won the Oscar. I like the com
ment inside—“ Never has so
much been written about some
one who has so little to say.”
. . . And listen to this from
* Charlton Heston: “Hollywood
has created its own monsters,
and they’re all femiplne.” Well!
Time-is-passing department:
Child Star Natalie Wood grad
uates from Van Nuys High j
School in June. And add the
Hollywood touch—to celebrate,
she has already purchased a 1955
convertible which she drives to
her acting chores in “Rebel
Without a Cause.” Natalie has
been offered the role of Ann
Frank in the Broadway play,
*VMary of a Oirl"—written by I
Chayevsky. With no bigger star
names than those of Ernest Borg
nine and Betsy Blair (Mrs. Gene
Kelly), it promises to be the
amazing money-maker of the
year.
This, on top of the success of
Jack Webb’s movie version of
"Dragnet,” the film companies
have fairly leaped into the
breach. Within the space of a
week, for instance, MGM has ac
quired rights to such recent tele
vision hits as “Fearful Decision,”
and “The Rack.” “The Rack” is
the work of Rod Serling whose
earlier electronic drama hit was
“Patterns.”
"The Rack” will be rechris
tened “Court Martial” in the
movie version. Glenn FPrd,
1 Metro’s most delightful recent
'talent acquisition, will play the
lead.
** * *
j* FURTHERMORE: Sheldon
Reynolds, the "Foreign Intrigue”
man. one of television's most
{ successful sleep delayers for sev
eral seasons, is another recruit
! to movie-making.
He has hired Robert Mitchum
I as his star, made plans to shoot
the film this summer on foreign
soil (where else?), and reportedly
has two big Hollywood studios
panting for the distribution
rights.
Peace, it's profitable.
** * v
TROUBLE IN PARADISE:
Troubles keep multiplying for
Rita Hayworth. The star who
recently served notice on Colum
j bla that she would terminate her
! contract and switch to inde
; pendent production with United
1 Artists, has hit a snag. It takes
! the form of notice to United
! Artists by Columbia that it has
no intention of giving up Rita
without a fight. The latter,
naturally, is not sure it would
care to get involved in one more
melee between the star and her
old bosses.
+ *,* *
WHO’S WHERE?: There’s a
question that is getting to be
impossible to answer in show
business.
Next fall, for instance, Danny
Kaye will stop being a Holly
wood fixture as he has been, ex
cept when traveling, for 10 years.
He is coming back to Broadway
in a musical version of an Alec
Guinness film hit, "The Cap
tain’s Paradise.” The adapta
tion is being done by the writing
team of Howafd Lindsay and
Russel Crouse whose last contri
bution to the musical stage was
"Call Me Madam.”
* boundaries anywhere, any
.
the girl who lived thiough the
Nazi occupation of Holland.
When Rita Hayworth learned
that her studio was considering
Tony Curtis for Joseph in “Jo
seph and His Brethren," she
quipped, “Then they should get
Debbie Reynolds for my role.”
Say. that’s not a bad idea. But
I have an odd feeling that Rita
will be back in the picture before
long.
Leo McCarey has cooled on
the idea of starring Mario Lanza
in “The Adventures of Marco
Polo.” It’s one thing being tem
peramental in this country. But
to act pp in Spain would really
be a headache.
Remember when Carole Lom
bard and John Barrymore
starred in the movie. “Twen
tieth Century?” Now I hear that
Shelley Winters will play the
Lombard role on the screen. It’d
be nice to give the other part to
John junior—only he still looks
like such a baby.
To give you an idea of how
Rock Hudson has climbed in the
; film firmament, he now employes
Bette Davis' former secretary,
Bridget Price. I’d like to read a
book about Hollywood, by a sec
retary to the stars.
** * *
Marlene Dietrich, Rhonda
Flemming, Terry Moore, Gloria
Swanson, Shirley Booth and Carol
Channing are among the lovelies
who will attend the big party at
Toots Shor’s Saturday for the
Damon Runyon TV Theater.
Hosts include Jack “Big Butch”
Dempsey, Leo "Jack the Beefer”
Durocher, Alfred “The Fingers”
Vanderbilt and Joe “Sleep Out
Sam” Di Maggio. Joe’s date for
the party will be Marilyn Mon
roe.
The Grace Kelly-Oleg Cassini
romance has to be over. Oleg
has been dating Claudette
Thornton. Bob Stack’s ex-steady.
Tallulah Bankhead opens here
next Wednesday at the Biltmore
in "Dear Charles," and Tallu is
tossing a party for all her
dahlings .on Tuesday. I’ll be
there! *
(Helmed by HAMA)
Medical Complaint Plan
HELENA, Mont. UP). The
American Medical Association
has been studying a Montana
physician-patient grievance pro
gram as a possible pattern for
wider use. The Montana Medical
Association set up a grievance
committee to hear patients’
complaints. Dr. Harold W. Ful
ler. committee chairman re
ported that advance discussion
of fees between the patient and
his physician or surgeon would
eliminate many grievances.
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'GAME OF LOVE'PLAYERS
And it is a poignant score with which Nicole Berger and
Pierre-Michel Beck come up at the end of the film now at
the Plaza Theater. The screenscript is based upon one of
the late Colette’s most searching stories of childhood's
emergence into adolescence.
NEWS OF MUSIC
W&L Players Show
Remarkable Technique
BY DAY THORPE
Washington-Lee High School Sym
phony Orchestra, Dorothy Baumle,
conductor. Soloists: Hugh Matheny,
oboe; June Cook, piano; Sally Strat
ton piano- At the Washington-
Lee High School. Program: Toccata.
Prescobaldi. arr. Kindler: Two move
ments from Symphony No. 1, B flat.
Schumann; Winter’s Passed, for oboe
and strings. Barlow* Angelus, Masse
net: Overture to Die Meistersinger,
Wagner: First Movement and finale
of the Concerto for Two Pianos. K.
316a, Mozart.
If you can judge a school by
its orchestra, the students at
Arlington’s Washington-Lee high
school are well educated. The
members of the large orchestra,
which gave a concert last night
under the direction of Dorothy
Baumle, an instructor in the
music department, did not every
one of them play up to profes
sional standards, but the ap
proach to music of each of them
was professional, and the con
cert was one of great vitality
and remarkable technical polish.
Girls outnumber boys in the
orchestra of more than 100 ap
proximately two to one. First
fiddles are evenly divided, but
the second fiddles are mostly
played by girls. The five flutes
are all girls, as are two trom
bones, a horn, a bassoon, the
concertmaster and the leader of
the second violins. The four
trumpets are safely in the hands
of men, but the orchestra’s only
cornet is blown very nicely by a
girl.
Miss Baumle cannot be con
gratulated too sincerely, in a
time when all too frequently
children's music is thought of
WHERE
AND WHEN
CURRENT THEATER
ATTRACTIONS
AND TIME OF SHOWING
Stage
National “The Seven Year i
Itch”; 2:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Shubert—“The Honeys”; 2:30 ’
and 8:30 p.m.
Arena—“ The World of Sholom j
Aleichem’;; 2:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Screen
Ambassador—“ East of Eden”;
1, 3:05, 5:15, 7:20 and 9:35 pm.
Capitol—“ Hit the Deck”; 11
am., 1:05, 3:15, 5:25, 7:35, 9:40
and 11:50 p.m.
Colony—“ The Little Kidnap
pers”; 6, 8:10 and 9:55 p.m.
Columbia "Conquest of
Space”; 10:45 a.m., 12:45, 2:45,
4:50, 6:50, 8:50 and 10:50 p.m.
Dupont—“Wuthertng Heights”;
11 a.m., 1:05, 3:10, 5:15, 7:25.
9:35 and 11:45 pm.
Keith’s “The Long Gray
Line”; 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:15,
6:45, 9:15 and 11:40 p.m.
Little "Chandra”; 1. 2:45,
4:30, 6:15, 8:05 and 9:50 p.m.
MacArthur "Doctor in the
House”; 2, 3:55, 5:45, 7:45 and
9:50 pm.
Metropolitan—“ East of Eden”;
11 am.. 1:05. 3:10, 5:15, 7:25.
9:30 and 11:40 pm.
Ontario—“ Camille"; 1:30,3:30,
5:35, 7:35 and 9:40 pm.
Palace—“A Man Called Peter”;
11:30 a.m., 2. 4:25, 6:55, 9:25 and
11:55 p.m.
Playhouse "The Glass Slip
per”; 10:40 am., 12:30, 2:20,
4:10, 6, 7:55, 9:45 and 11:35 p.m
Plaza—“ Game of Love”; 12,
1:50. 3:50, 5:50, 7:50, 9:50 and
11:50 pm.
Trans-Lux “The Country
Glil”; 10:45 a.m., 12:30, 2:25,
4:20, 6:15, 8:15, 10:15 p.m. and
12:10 am.
Warner—“ This la Cinerama";
2, 5 and 8:30 pm.
27 Racing Pigeons
Reported Stolen
A pigeon fancier reported to
police yesterday the theist of 27
of his homing racers from a loft
at the rear of his home at 734
QUincy street N.W.
Charles L. Smith, 57, said he'
missed the birds when he wenti
to feed them. He placed their!
value at $l5O and Mid each wore
an international identification!
band.
-V
only as a social grace and not as
an artistic accomplishment, on
an orchestra that plays so well
in tune, with such good color,
and with such assurance. It is
not at every concert that one
hears so exciting a performance
of the Meistersinger overture.
Hugh Matheny, the first oboist,
turned soloist to play an in
consequential piece called “Win
ter’s Passed,” and showed a tal
ent far superior to the music.
After intermission, Sally Strat
ton put aside her bass viol, ana
June Cook laid down her violin
to collaborate in a performance
of the Mozart concerto for two
pianos. Both played very well—
so well, in fact, that it seemed a
shame that the middle movement
of tiie piece was omitted for no
apparent reason.
While there may be a certain
latitude in a school orchestra in
the matter of arrangements to fit
the personnel. Miss Baumle, who
did not hesitate to use only
strings as accompaniment in the
piece for oboe, may have shown
bad judgment in letting the full
orchestra play the Mozart score.
In a piece for strings, bassoons,
oboes and horns, a large orches
tra Including even trombones
and trumpets can only cause con
fusion and distortion. General
participation may be good for
morale, but more important than
morale in an ochestra that clear
ly has so much of it is the culti
vation of a feeling for style.
Police Seize
35 Lewd Films
Undercovermen seized 35 lewd
films from three penny arcades
here during a series of ratds
yesterday, police reported.
| Inspector Roy Blick, of the
! morals division, said he used the
j ruse of sending new undercover
! men into the arcades in the 1200
block of New York avenue N.W
Six men were arrested.
He said 14 short reels were
seized at the Variety. 10 at the
Funland and 11 at the Coney
Island, all in the same block.
Chester S. Mattingly, 37, of
the 2800 block of Gainesville
street S.E., and John Price, 66,
of the 1200 block of Massa
chusetts avenue N.W., were ar
rested at the Coney Island.
Arrested at the Variety were
Carol W. Shore, 42, of the 1900
block of Thirty-seventh street
N.W., and William A. Farina.
58, of the 1800 block of Twenty
third street S.E.
Raymond A. Mcßoberts, 22, of
the 1100 block of K street N.W.,
and Henry A. Remsnyder, of the
5700 block of Eignteenth ave
nue, Chlllum, Md., were ar
rested ft the Funland. All six
were charged with possession of
obscene film and exhibiting ob
scene film.
Two Boys Die
In Old Icebox
LOS ANGELES, April 16 (/P).—
Two small boys were found dead
In an abandoned icebox last
night.
A search of several hours end
ed when the bodies of Albert
Arebalo, 8. and his small com
panion, David Anthony Fen
nessy, 2, were found by sheriff's
deputies.
The old icebox was stored in a
tumbledown chicken shed near
the boys’ homes. The youngsters
were found crouched inside the
box. Fireman R. F. Britton said
they had been dead about five
hours.
John Richardson, 26, owner of
the property where the tragedy
occurred, said the icebox had
been stored in the shed for six
months.
| The boys were the sons of Mr
I and Mrs. Frank Fennessy and
! Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Arebalo.
! Both Mrs. Fennessy and Mrs.
i Arebalo are expectant mothers.
NAVY SAYS CLOUD SEEDING
YIELDS NO WEATHER CROP
NEW YORK (A*).—The Navy says "Operation Scud,” an
attempt to alter weather along the East Coast by seeding
storm clouds, has prove a dud.
The official report yesterday from New York Univer
sity, which evaluated the tests, Mid:
The experiment lent no support to the theory that seed
ing can make, break or change a storm In a big way.”
Dr. Jerome Star, NYU scientist in charge of the experi
ment, Mid localized seeding might work, but added: ‘These
is no evidence of any large-scale meteorological effects due
to seeding.”
In the experiment, sponsored by the Office of Naval
Research, planes dropped 30 tons of dry ice between Florida
and Massachusetts and sent aloft 250 pounds of silver iodide
from 17 generating stations between New York and Florida.
The tests were conducted between January through
April, 1953, and from December, 1953, through April, 1954.
New York City spent about $50,000 on rainmaking at
tempts to break the 1950 drought. Limited success was re
ported.
Fund-Raising Trip
Planned by Pastor
Os Chinese Church
The interdominatianal board
of managers of the Chinese Com
munity Church last night voted
Dr. C. C. Hung, pastor, a summer
leave of absence to seek new
building funds among Chinese
on the West Coast and Hawaii.
Plans call for Dr. Hung to
leave here about May 1 for San
Francisco, where he will be co
chairman of the first national
conference of the Chinese
churches, sponsored by the Na
tional Council of Churches of
Christ.
When this meeting adjourns
May 12, Dr. Hung will begin his
fund-raising efforts. The fund
stands now at about $20,000. The
church is located at 1011 L street
N.W.
The board of managers ap
proved the appointment of Dr.
T. T. Ho as interim pastor dur
ing Dr. Hung’s absence. Dr. Ho,
a Methodist who is studying at
Westminster Theological Semi
nary, Westminster, Md., was in
troduced last night.
Broadcasters
Pick Officers
By the Associated Press
Chesapeake and Virginia Asso
ciated Press broadcasters yes
terday electld new officers.
David V. R. Stickle, news
director of WMAR-TV, Balti
more, was elected president of
the Chesapeake A. P. Radio, TV
Broadcasters Association. He
succeeds R. C. Embry, general
manager of WITH of Baltimore.
The Virginia Associated Press
Broadcasters elected Wendell
Siler, manager of WRAD, Rad
ford, Va., as president. He suc
ceeds Howard Hamrick, program
director of WRNI, Richmond.
The Chesapeake Association
also named William Paulsgrove,
assistant manager of WJEJ,
Hagerstown, as vice president.
John Mine of the Baltimore
bureau of the A. P. was elected
secretary.
For other officers, the Virginia
group elected Don Greene of
WSVS, Crewe, Va., vice presi
dent: E. S. Whitlock, WRNL,
Richmond, treasurer, and Frank
H. Fuller, Richmond bureau!
chief of the A. P. secretary.
Churchmen to Meet
The Fairfax County Associa
tion of Churches will hold its
fifth annual meeting at 3:30
p.m. tomorrow in St. Paul’s j
Episcopal Church, Baileys Cross
Roads, Va. Lloyd Millegan, a
layman of Fairfax, Va., is presi-j
dent. He will preside.
V m rfVjflU ST 3-4777 '
WE SHOW
TONIGHT
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WmfjJlUm a-1326 |
NOMINEE FOR THE’
. ft, «£” INTERNATIONAL I
/TW GRAND PRIX!
lIiPHM
i <//Ajpi, India’s Fabulous
"HAUICH GliqS”
7rti * T N.W. NO. 7-3000
| HOWARD j
“Mister Personality'’
• IN PERSON •
LOUIS JORDAN
& Hit Tympany Five
Downbeat Award Winner
BENNY GREEN
it Hit Orchestra
Broadway Master Mimic
ARNOLD DOVER
Man with Happy Feet
DERBY WILSON
Midnite Show Tomorrow
Thrills in The Air
FERDINAND A GERRI j
Midnite Show Tonight!
WWjSSSum
MATINEE TODAY 2:3$ !
MBffl CIAWTOM
JESSICA HUME DOROTHY
TANDY* CRONYN • STICKHEY
’‘THE HONEYS*
a«—wwROAU DAM
Fall of Bataan
Observed Tonight
A dinner-dance in commemo
ratiton of the l£th anniversary
of the fall of the Bataan pen
insula is set for 7:30 this eve
ning at the Statler Hotel.
The affair is sponsored by the
members of the Ladies’ Auxil
iary of the “General Vicente
Lim” Post, No. 5471. of the Vet
erans of Foreign Wars.
Col. John R. Pugh, former aide
to the late Gen. Jonathan Wain
wright, and Paul T. Leuterio,
Philippine Minister Plenipoten
tiary to the United States, will
speak.
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WEEK
One of The Many Great Moments That Make
Eua Kazan* explosive production of
John Steinbeck*
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THE SENSATION PICTURE THIS YEAR!
It’s the new hit from Academy Award Director Elia Kazan!
Warner Bros, in CINEmaScOPE
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GARBO IS BACK! j
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TOMT 1W TMKMT •»»
BETHESDA NYATTSYUE
w »*.hi mmurt u-itti aannmnw miam
LATE SHOW TONIGHT!
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