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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 19, 1955, Image 20

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THE EVENING STAR, Washington, D. C.
Tuesday. Aran. is. iass
Bigger Counseling Staffs
In High Schools Studied
BY JAMES G. DEANE
Bigger counseling staffs may
be sought for at least some
District high schools.
School Supt. Hobart M. Cor
ning , yesterday promsed the
Board of Education a recom
mendation on this score. The
promise followed a cotnolamt
from the city's largest high
school, Cardozo, that its present
two counselors aren’t enough
Cardozo's parent-teach* r as
sociation recently urged the
school board to provide at least
one more counselor, asserting
that other schools were more
adequately staffed. Cardozo cur
rently has 1.719 students.
Counselors advise students on
courses of study, college require
ments and personal problems,
and work with school principals
in disciplinary cases.
i Rule Sets Number
The present school board rule
allots two counselors to each
senior high and one to each
vocational and junior high, re
gardless of enrollment.
Deputy Supt. Norman J. Nel
son told board members that
high school principals several
years ago urged a rule change to
provide a counselor for every 600
students. He pointed out this
was turned down by Dr. Corn
ing at the time as being too
much of a burden to the school
budget.
Several board members said
they felt the matter should be
reconsidered, however.
The school board asked for
10 new junior high counselors
in the budget for next year, but
the Commissioners deleted the
$461,000 item before sending the
budget to Congress. School offi
cials hoped to ask for still more
junior high counselors next year.
Other Actions
On other matters yesterday,
board members:
SCHOOL BOARD
KEEP-IT-COOL
POLICY MELTS
Things are getting too hot
for the District School
Board.
t Col. West A. Hamilton.
t|>ard member, brought the
hot problem out into the
open yesterday.
The trouble is, said Col.
Hamilton, looking around
the room at 86-year-old
Franklin School where the
board has been meeting for
30 years, board business gets
too heated. He proposed in
stalling an air-conditioner.
Board members raised the
temperature slightly in a
brief debate. Wesley S. Wil
liams said he considered the
colonel’s proposal “an excel
lent thought, but I've got
the answer —no money.”
Mrs. Frank S. Phillips also
expressed fears about “ex
cessive cost.”
Superintendent Hobart M.
Corning threw in a warn
ing.
“If you get it, your hear
ings will be longer than
we’ve ever had before, be
cause people will get so com
fortable they’ll want to stay
all afternoon,” he said.
Counsel for Zenith
Hits Two Networks
CHICAGO, April 19 (IP) Jo
seph S. Wright, general counsel
of Zenith Radio Corp., says
the “monopolistic position” of
two major networks is retard*
lng the growth of television.
“If a broadcaster has either
a NBC or a CBS affiliation he
makes money,” Mr. Wright said
Sunday in a radio discussion of
the pros and cons of subscription
television.
“If he doesn’t have it, then he
is likely to starve to death.”
Mr. Wright continued: “It is
perfectly obvious that . . . NBC
and CBS. by virtue of their con
trol over affiliation and pro
grams and advertising on TV.
have a monopolistic position in
this industry and we will never
have television brought to the
hinterland and small towns un
less way is found by the broad
caster of providing additional
programs over and above and
beyond the two dominant net
works.”
Subscription television can
provide the answer, said Mr.
Wright, one of the speakers on
a Northwestern University radio
pawl discussion.
9>okesmen for NBC and CBS
in New York said there would
be no comment immediately on
Mr. Wright's remarks.
Cab Driver Cleared
In Traffic Death
A taxicab driver, held on a
technical charge of homicide in
the traffic death of a 68-year-old
pedestrian, was cleared yester
day by a coroner’s jury at a Dis
trict Morgue Inquest.
Held blameless in the accident
Friday afternoon at Pennsyl
vania avenue and Barney Circle
S.E was Ernest Kavadas. 29. of
4102 Tenth street NE. His cab
fatally injured Robert W Karla
of 811 Seventeenth street S.E.
Testimony disclosed that Mr
Karla started across Pennsyl
vania avenue, a street 112 feet
wide, on the green light. How
ever, the signal changed to red
before he could complete the
crossing.
In addition, pvt. Francis Buck
ler of the accident investigation
unit said a contributing factor
to the accident was ihe .’act the
weather was misty, cutting down
an visibility.
Called on the Cardozo PTA to
help cut down damage to type
writers in the school’s secretarial
classes. The PTA had complained
that not enough repair service
was being provided.
Voted to tell the highway de
partment present plans for re
vamping Stanton Park may en
danger pupils of the Stuart Jun
ior High and Peabody Elemen
tary Schools.
Postponed action on a pro
posal to allow out-of-town
teacher candidates to substitute
national teacher exams for the
written District tests now re
quired for permanent teacher
jobs. Candidates could take the
national tests near their homes,
which might encourage more of
them to apply here, the board
was told.
J
■* 9
mmtmmmmmamua sasasssssss
What The Doctor OrderecL.For Himself!
The doctor had owned his new Cadillac for about a The doctor is experiencing, of course, what so when it answers a smart touch to the throttle,
month—and he was talking to a friend. many other professional and business men are Steering is little more than the response to your
"About the only recreation I get,” he said, "is at experiencing-Mr W*> she spin's shot thought. You just ride and relax,
the wheel of my motor car—driving to and from the a Cedillas brings a man. We hear it every day: “I drive my Cadillac for
hospital, my office, and the homes of patients. Try it sometime—and see for yourself. rest and relaxation."
“Other doctors, of course, have the same situation You’ll find there’s something about the way you Why not come in today—and make the test
—and some of them kept telling me what a big ‘lift’ feel as you take the wheel. You know there’s a car yourself. We’ll give you the keys and a Cadillac—
they were getting out of their Cadillacs. under you! Solid, substantial, capable and protective. and the “rest” is up to you!
««i j-j j . c ir j.l Just to sit there gives you a wonderful feeling of con- * « *
I decided to see for myself—and they were ' * ' “
certainly right. I actually approach the day with a ence an we ein ®‘ P.S.: It’s only fair to warn you: You probably
lot more zest—knowing that I am going to be able And when you start to move; the thrill is contin- won’t find it easy to give up the keys. Some people
to spend a couple of hours driving my Cadillac.” uous. You almost never hear the great engine, except simply refuse!
OANYOL GAOILLAC-OLDSMOBILE COMPANY
ITarll.g 3 2600 1222 22,2 SI. B.W.
SUBURBAN CADILLAC - OLOSMOBILE COMPANY AKERS OLDSMOBILE-CADILLAC COMPANY
OU«w 6-7100 Bradlty Slipping Cmlti, Bilkptda, HA OVarlwk M 360 FalrllngtM Slapping Caatar, Bln.»«,
Virginia Lkens* 795
Hacker Injured
During Yoking
A cab driver suffered a throat
injury last night inflicted by two
assailants who yoked him.
Treated and released at Dis
trict General Hospital was Wil
liam McPhail, 24. colored hacker
of 60 DeFrees street N.W.
Police said he told them he
picked up two colored men as
fares at New Jersey and Inde
pendence avenues N.W. They
told him to drive to Montello
avenue and Raum street N.E.
In the 1200 block of Raum
street, the driver told police, one
of the men grabbed him from
behind and demanded money.
A struggle ensued, and the
cab driver suffered a lacerated
throat, inflicted by an unknown
weapon.
No money was obtained. The
assailants escaped by running
east on Raum street.
S7O Million in Constellations
Ordered by Howard Hughes
BY HARRY LEVER
It would have to be somebody
like Howard Hughes, the multi
millionaire, to place the biggest
single order for commercial air
planes in the history of the
aircraft industry—s7o million
worth.
Mr. Hughes disclosed yester
day that he has ordered from
the Lockheed Aircraft Corp. 24
giant airliners of a new design—
an improvement on that of the
standard Constellation. They will
be put into service by Trans
World Airlines, following delivery
scheduled for early in the year
1957.
The new aircraft, called the
Constellation 1649, will have a
top speed in excess of 400 miles
an hour, and will cruise between
350 and 370 miles an hour. The
ships will be the fastest long
range airliners in the world, and
will have a nonstop range of
6,500 miles.
“The new airplanes will per
mit a true all-condition, all
weather east and west bound
schedule from New York to Lon
don and Paris nonstop,” Mr.
Hughes explained.
A main feature of the 1649 s
will be a new high-speed, low
drag wing, which will be 27
feet longer and 200 square feet
greater in area than those of
today’s largest Constellations.
The airplanes will be powered
by the latest model Wright 3,400-
horsepower turbo-compound en
gines.
Lady Tax Collector
Weathers Storm
France’s first “charm girl” tax
collector already has met diffi
culties but remains unruffled,
Dijon reports.
She is Mile. Jacqueline Pracht,
one of 29 women the government
is training to collect taxes in
areas where, male tax collectors
have been manhandled and
have failed.
Fulbright Sees
Danger Sign in
Rising Stocks
NEW YORK, April 19 UP). —
Senator Fulbright, Democrat, of
Arkansas, says he believes the
; Nation is “experiencing the be
ginning of excessive speculative
activity In our market.”
Senator Fulbright, chairman
of the Senate Banking and Cur
rency Committee, says this ac
tivity of stocks has resumed
after a brief respite during his
; committee hearings on the stock
market last month.
The Senator discussed the ris
ing trend in stocks last night in
an address at a dinner of the
Economic Club of New York.
Urges Breaking of ‘Spell’
He said it would be good If the
public, active participants in the
market and Government leaders
“broke the hypnotic spell cast
I over them by the rise in stock
prices and looked at the danger
signs in the larger economy of
which the stock market is a
part.”
“I am not implying,” the Sen
ator said, “that I think prices
are too high in the case of in
dividual stocks or in the average
market level.’’ He added that
only the free market itself “can
say whether a stock price is too
high, as long as buyers are will
ing to pay for it.”
Cites Symptoms
Senator Fulbright said his ref
erence to "excessive speculative:
activity” was limited to the way j
stock prices are being reached.
He said this involves the
I “prevalence of tipsters, flamboy
ant advertising keyed to expec
tations of quick appreciation, in
i creases in the amount of credit,
the tendency to avoid credit
restraints, the tendency to resent
and ressist all warnings of cau
tion. and the introduction in the
market of a rash of new issues
such as penny uranium stocks,
which are transparently specu
lative in character.”
Because of his Senate commit
tee’s stock market study, Sena
tor Fulbright said. "I have had
my attention focusvi ail the *
more sharply on the elements of •
danger present in the excessive
mortgage debt, in the excess!,
installment debt, and on the way; .
farm economy has lagged sub
stantially behind other sectors in
the general economic recovery of
the last few months.”
'Stork Assistants'
Get Formal Title
PITTSBURGH, Pa. UP).—Am
bulance drivers of the Pittsburgh
Police Department, often are'
nicknamed “stork assistants” by
fellow officers. Now they will be .
entitled to the more formal title
“obstetrical first aidmen.” The l
title will be included in a certlfi- *
cate to be given to policemen *
completing a course taught by 1
Dr. Clarence Ingram.
Fifty policemen—all ambu- l
lance drivers—enrolled for the '
first classes. •»’ *
Officer John Pektas. a member
of the police force for 14 years, -
was the student picked as most
likely to succeed. He has assist
ed at 44 deliveries and says:
“Mothers and children all have
done well.”

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