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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, February 29, 1956, Image 67

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1956-02-29/ed-1/seq-67/

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B-22
THE EVENING STAR, Washington, D C.
WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 3». I»A6
THE PASSING SHOW
MissMagnani Sizzles
In The Rose Tatoo'
By JAY CARMODY
Tennessee Williams whose poetically passionate fretting over
sex has kept the country agog for a decade, is back again with
some further reflection on the subject in “The Rose Tattoo.”
This is the film version which opened today at the Ontario
Theater. It is one of the five candidates for Academy best picture
award but its chance for honors seems slimmer than that of
Magnani who plays the starring;
role.
Miss Magnani, Italy’s best
actress, gives a performance that
throws a brilliant light on what
an uncomplex woman can make
out of an equally basic male.
This may not be exactly the in
telligence the world most des
perately needs but it does make
for screen drama. And for Miss
Magnani’s artistic reputation ini
hbr first movie in English, and
in Hollywood.
"The Rose Tattoo" being a kind
of journalism to begin with, and
on a taboo theme, is more effec
tive in this treatment than it
was on the stage. There are
two reasons for this. The first,
of course, is Miss Magnani’s per-;
formance; the second that the
camera is a much more adroit
peeping Tom than any stage
director could hope to be.
If the picture has a glaring
weakness, and you can bet it
does, it is to be found in Burt
Lancaster’s performance. As the
male from whom Miss Magnani
learns that all is not dead be
cause her man has died. Lan
caster gives a simpering idiot
performance that is as much his
fault as that of Williams. The
latter, of course, is rather no
torious for the weirdness of his
male characters, of which Lan
caster’s is one of the more eerie.
** * *
In its surface terms. "The Rose
Tattoo” is the story of an Italian
widow consumed by her sensory
memories of her truck-driver
mate who got himself killed.
Although her world died with
him, she is obligated to go
through a routine of living to
support and protect the ado
lescent daughter of her passion
ate union with the trucker. Miss
Magnani makes no tragic display
of this maternal duty. Par from
it. No woman has ever suffered
more hilariously than her Sera
flna.
If the world has robbed her.
it shall pay for it. She brow
beats her neighbors and snarls
at the customers who use her
services as a seamstress. More
dramatically than either of these,
she safeguards her pretty, bud
ding offspring with the ferocity
of a woman whose relations with
one man have made all other
men suspect.
This can be a very funny busi
ness, but one with just the right
touch of poignance, in the hands
of an actress as stormily en
dowed as Miss Magnani. There
is nothing decorative about her.
in fact she dares to live up to
“ WHERE
AND WHEN
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing
Stage
National—" Damn Yankees”;
1:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Shu her t—“ Bus Stop”; 2:30
and 8:30 p.m.
Screen
Ambassador “Come Next
Spring”; 1:25, 3:25, 5:30. 7:30
and 9:35 p.m.
Capitol “Carousel”: 11:35
am., 2:10, 4:40, 7:15 and 9:45
p.m.
Colony—" Marty”; 6:30, 8:10
and 9:50 p.m.
Columbia—“ The Last Hunt”;
11:10 am., 1:15, 3:20, 5:30, 7:35;
and 9:45 p.m.
Dupont “Diabolique”; 11:30
am., 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:35 and
9:40 p.m.
Kenth’s “Benny Goodman
Story"; 11:15 am., 1:20, 3:30,
8:40, 7:45 and 9:55 p.m.
Little—“ Kind Hearts and Cor
onets"; 1, 2:40, 4:30, 6:25, 8:15
and 10:05 p.m.
Metropolitan “Come Next
Spring”; 11:40 a.m., 1:40, 3:40,
6:40. 7:40, 9:45 p.m.
MacArthur—“The Prisoner”;
6:05, 8:05 and 9:55 p.m.
Ontario—“ The Rose Tattoo”;’
1, 3:10, 5:20, 7:35 and 9:45 p.m.
Palace—“l’ll Cry Tomorrow”: j
11:30 a.m., 2:05, 4:40, 7:10 and
9:45 p.m.
Playhouse—" All That Heaven
Allows”; 11:15 a.m., 1, 2:45, 4:30, ;
6:20, 8:05 ar.d 9:55 p.m.
Plazn "Littlest Outlaw”: |
12, 1:40, 3:20, 5:05, 6:45, 8:30
and 10:10 p.m.
Trans-Lux "Picnic”; 10:15,
a.m., 12:15, 2:15, 4:15, 6:15, 8:20
and 10:30 p.m.
Warner—" Cinerama Holiday”;
2 and 8:30 p.m.
r.ATEit h Haras concerts
IN' CONSTITUTION HALL
THIS SUN., 3:00 P.M.
Th* One—The Only—The Original
DON COSSACK
Chorus and Dancers
SERGE JAROFF, Conductor
GOOD HEATS AVAILABLE
51.20. SI.BO. 52.10. 53.00
Sun., March 11—3:00 PH
Wilhelm Backhaus
ALL BEETHOVEN RECITAL
ONLY WASHINGTON APPtARANCI
THIS SEASON AND PINAL CONCESI
HERE SEPORE A SABBATICAL YEAR.
GOOD SEATS AVAILABLE *
Bl.m *I.BO. 53.10. 53.00. 83.00
nAVES CONCERT BUREAU
lln Campbell'*! IIOH 0 81 N.W
NAtlonal 8 Tlftl S«*lnw»y Pl.nn
1 BEST ACTOR
1 0F ™J,SSE
i iiijiiiirif
= .'-V-.J ERNEST RORCNINE
THE ROSE TATTOO, m Pmrnmont r«-
le.se. produced by A. Hnl WmlU«.
directed by Dnntel Mann, based on the
stage play oI Tennessee Williams, with
1 screenplay by the author, musical dlrec
, tlon by Alex North, at the Ontario.
The Caat'
Beraflna Delle Rote Anna Magnani
Alvaro Mangiacavallo Burt Lancaster
Rosa Delle Roae . Marlsa Pavan
Jack Hunter Ben Cooper
Estelle Hohengarten Virginia Grey
; Bessie _ Jo Van Fleet
Father De Leo Sandro Qlgllo
> Assunta .. Mint Aguglla
, Flora .. Florence Sundstrom
School teacher DoTrlt Kelton_
I
her description as a floor-mop,
but all the beauties in Hollywood
1 rolled into one could not achieve
her primitive force.
After losing the man whose
rose tattoo symbolized all that
■ was masculine, all other mem
bers of the sturdier sex are
1 anathema to Seraflna. This »s
; most searingly true of the parish
1 priest whose proffers of spiritual
comfort she disdains to the point
• of physical violence.
■ It is also true of Lancaster.
1 a truck driver too. when he first
;; sidles into her life but it lasts
1 only until she becomes conscious
' of his torso and his possibilities
' as a mate—of a sort.
t** * *
’ Daniel Mann, working from
! Williams’ adaptation of his own
' play, directs “The Rose Tattoo"
> with Hie confidence of a man
' who knows he can leave so much
-of his work to Miss Magnani. j
The sound idea is just to let her
: take camera and show how far
1 a single-minded loyalty can turn
' a simple woman into a tragi- j
r comic human.
Nevertheless, it Is part of,Miss;
1 Magnanfs art that she knows
> when to stop and give the other*,
1 except for Lancaster, their
■ chances to take over.
It is this that makes Marissa
> Pavan’s performance as the
r mortified, bewildered daughter ]
1 worthy of nomination as one of |
1 the year s best supporting roles.
■ That the film's two feminine i
principals should both be Italian i
• may suggest that there is more
■ to this type than the shape which
> has attracted so much attention, i
Ben Cooper as the young man
: who dares to court Miss Pavan.
Virginia Grey as the woman who
shared the dead trucker's favors
: with Seraflna. and Jo Van Fleet
•as the neighborhood's blond
' tramp are others who manage i
to make their presences felt in
“The Rose Tattoo.”
> -
■PMwnpp'r? 1 IW|
11 ■ I »MM] RODGERS & HAMMERSTEINS <2
NOW iw NKT MonoN ncniM mtmcnvw AHllAaiOßil
On* 10 45 cinemascope* carousel I
5Si COLOR by Dt LUXE ~ HBMMi
\ '«•'? In Orama of The Buffalo Hunters—and The
‘-|L ■ ! Captive Indian Beauty They Both Wanted!
JITmIASTHUNTiI ||
Mr
HHD OKS!
D| I including %
..... . ,*
■r
VH|;;-.
*ll >
i * fih ■. ><. v i ✓
J:, •■*. |. : *
IT'S BEEN A LONG , LONG TIME
Ann Sheridan, who doesn’t exactly knock herself out making
one movie after another, is back with us again today. She
plays the leading feminine role, opposite Steve Cochran,
In “Come Next Spring,” new screen attraction at the
Metropolitan and Ambassador Theaters.
HOLLYWOOD
By SHBILAH GRAHAM
Voices From the Past
HOLLYWOOD (NANAI. I
heard from two old-time movie
greats yesterday—Mary Pick
ford, first star of them all, and
Corinne Griffith.' one of the
brightest and most beautiful.
Mary called about the sale, after
37 years, of her United Artists
stock ownership. “I feel a little
sad and a little lost.” said the
gracious lady who will always
spell the enchantment of Holly
wood for millions all over the
world. "But my love for the
motion-picture business is just
as great and I will continue to
work for its prestige and bene
fit.” She always has.
it
~wL % ■
My contact with Corinne was
1 through her new book, “Eggs I
Have Known.” It's about food
1 and famous people, and she was
' there when Lady Thelma Fur
ness Introduced the then Prince
’ of Wales to the then Mrs. Wally
1 Simpson. Lady Thelma gave
1 Corinne the prince’s favorite
! “after-dir.ner course" or "sa
-1 vory.” You can follow It In the
| book under “England's Camem
; bert cheese mold.”
*» * *
i To come back to the imme
■ diate present, neither of thp *wo
most glamorous girls of Holly-
[wood today—Anita Ekberg and'
Grace Kelly—had a man to her
name at the Golden Globe
awards, hosted by the Hollywood
Foreign Press Association. . . .
Her Grace very sedately ac
cepted the globe for Marlon
Brando as well as herself. . . .
Her former flame. Jean Pierre
Aumont, showed up as usual
with pretty Marisa Pavan. . . .
There were few hits, misses or
errors, but Jeanne Crain turned
as red as her hair when she was
asked to present the award to a
star of tomorrow, Russ Tamblyn,
instead of Arthur Kennedy for
whom she had prepared a
speech.
La Ekberg arrived alone, but
the beautiful Swedish lass, with
golden hair flowing on one side
of her shoulder, was Immediately
surrounded by 50 photographers'
who clicked and clacked for
10 minutes without reloading.
Reminded me of when Marilyn
Monroe caught on with the
cameramen and the public. . .
Susan Hayward, pretty in cocoa
brown, came with Mike Connolly.
NATIONAL NOW THRU MAR. lrlj
"AMERICA'S FIRST THEATRE"
Eee». 8:311; Mata.. We*, a Sail , 3:3*
S SPECIAL SUNDAY SHOWS
Mar, Ith A Mar. 11 lb at I P.M.
BOBBY CLARK
in
*** SMASH HIT MUSICAL Co Mfo
SHERRY!O’NEIL
Box Ogle • Open 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
lie winked at life... '* %•
and found it smiling right back-at him!
V* * WONDRfUt MmS&i A
■*', SLICE Os Lift V*** ,<* %
SPRINKLED -
w&gj AvilsPl^lHkjb f ? %
JWn Robert Donat %
IN THE TRADITION Os "GOODBYE. MR CHIPS'
Lease of Life
* Howl IMCM tfwuem. In 6ASTMANCQIOR
UST TIMES TODAY —ALEC GUINNESS in "THE PRISONER”
SEE THE PICTURE—
THE PERFORMANCES
THE WHOLE NATION
IS RAVING ABOUT!
8 ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATIONS
Including “Best Picture,” Best Actress” and “Best Supporting Actress”
“Magnani... best actress of tha “The sort of thing one encounters ones
year!”—Winner ot the New York in a generation!" -utvaoaynvitw
Film Critics Award.
“Roll out the Oscarsl”
-NCWSWiCK kUQAZ/Nt
“Burt Lancaster is superbl"
f —ny nuts
"Anna Magnani...what a woman,wKat
• an actress, what fire! There haa rarely,
“Magnani . . . world's greatest if ever, been a performance like it on
actress!" - Tiutusssimt the screen!’'
"M.gn.nr. performance may be .. M agnsnl is daxallngl"
1955 a best acting! -* y misaio rm»unt
-WOUAH S HOSSt COMPAWO*
“Another powerhouse *'Come Oscar time,
entry in Academy Award Magnani will be given en
-Bweepstakes l” thusiastic consideration!’'
-10* AMOtIIS WAAOAnewS —*tw OALSANS TIUtS-SICAYUNt
\\ltCT «Iho *tnrrinß MARISA PAVAN • BKN^COOPER
1 \ with Virßinin (irey • .lo Van Fieri • Smidro Clißlio • Directed by DANIEL MANN JjMIS.
\ Screenplay by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS • Adaptation by HAL KANTER
Baaed on the Flay. THE ROSE TATTOO" by Tenneaaee Williams
Music Score by Ale* M
tSMT fJtCw/b4o*
COLUMBIA ROAD AT 17TH IT. IjW,
[|. . . Zsa Zsa Gabor, who always 1
pays homage to beauty—her own
i and others—told the jam-packed
800 at the Cocoanut Grove: “I
, can’t stand the competition with
Ekberg.” Zsa Zsa’s escort was
i millionaire builder ' Hal Hayes.
. . . .'Errol Flynn quipped, “I’ve
been away so long, I haven’t 1
I even gotten around to Marilyn
. Monroe.” Wife Pat Wymore
■ laughed.
** * *
Gregory Peck, one of the award
presenters, was accompanied by
wife Veronique, at her first big
Hollywood function and very at
tractive in a black off-the
shoulder dress. . . . Some of the
; picture studio biggies weren’t
i too enthusiastic with the in
>; elusion of awards to TV per
' formers Dinah Shore, Walt
;'Disney, and Lucille Ball-Desi
• Amaz.
Don De Fore assures me that
’ WILUAM
In a JKjm Novak
AflL kttt Fiao • SUSAN STRASWKJ
Urosaundßusseix
H HblfDkney's
Q The LiHlesf-
Eilrt—
Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis
have a chance to win an “Emmy”'
—that’s the next mammoth prize
party on March 17. “On all the
nominations sent out.” said the
Academy of Television Arts and'
Sciences prexy, “there Is one
blank line for voters to list their
own preferences.” Robert Cum
mings is not yet definite to emcee
See GRAHAM, Page B-22
Last Mat. Today 2:30
6 Perf. Eves. 8:30
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STAN
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