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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, November 18, 1956, Image 18

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A-18
4* THE SUNDAY STAR, Washington, D. C.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBEE IS, 19. Vi
Wartime Polish Leader '
Gills Gomulka Pro-Soviet:
Stanlslaw Mikolajczyk, World War II leader of the Polish ’
Government in Exile, warned yesterday against “very misleading j
and dangerous” reports that present Polish Communist officials i
are closer to Tito than to Moscow.
Staff experts of the House Committee on Un-American ,
Activities who talked with him for two hours at the Capitol said 1 '
he described Wladyslaw Go
mulka. who recently returned
to power as Communist Party
chief in Poland, as “a fanatical
Communist whose aims are the
same as those of the Soviet;
Union.”
They quoted Mr. Mikolajczyk
as complaining that various ;
press accounts and some diplo-i
matic reports during the last
month have given an incorrect
impression that the new set-up
under Gomulka was following a
Titoist policy of obtaining major
concessions from the Kremlin.
“Gomulka’s aim is to insure
• the ultimate domination of the
world by Communists,” the for
mer Polish leader was quoted as
saying. “Recent events in Po
land have not changed his aims.
The full text of his speeches
make clear he is a dedicated
Soviet Communist. His pro
gram in Poland has not been
changed. He has emphasized
that the Soviet Army must re
maln in Poland and that plans
'Hams' to Aid
Hospital Drive
Ham radio operators with
sending and receiving equip
ment in their homes and cars
will add a- new dimension to the
membership campaign for the
Greater Southeast Hospital
Foundation.
The house-to-house campaign
for members at $lO a year will
be held the night of November
26. The purpose is to raise money
to pay for the 8 Vt -acre site at
Wheeler road and Mississippi
avenue S.E. which has been pur
chased for the 250-bed. $6 mil
lion hospital.
W. Ledru Koontz. chairman
of the hospital foundation’s
trustees, announced yesterday
the Washington Mobile Radio
Club will work with the more
than 1,000 volunteers in the
November 26 canvass.
If a volunteer doesn’t get to
the door of a prospective mem
ber, Mr. Koontz explained, that
person should telephone the hos
pital foundation headquarters.
A central dispatcher there will
immediately send a radio car to
pick up the membership pledge.
The Mobile Radio Club in
cludes 150 ham operators. Lt.
Comdr. Gay Millus is president.
Heading the volunteers in the
house-to-house campaign are
William Pritchard for the South
east area, and J. Louis Gelbman
for the Prince Georges County
area.
Chilean Artists
To Exhibit Here
An exhibition of oil paintings
by 15 Chilean artists is being
presented in the art gallery of
the Pan American Union, to
continue until December 11.
The exhibit is sponsored by
the Chilean Ambassador to the
Organization of American States
and Mrs. Alberto Sepulveda Con
treras. It has been arranged in
co-operation with the depart
ment of culture of the Ministry
of Education of Chile.
With the exception of Nemesio
Antunez and Pablo Burchard, Jr„
both of whom have had one-man
shows at the Pan American
Union before, the artists are
being presented here for the first
time. They include Pablo Bur
ehard’s brother, Pedro; Isi Cori,
Gabriela Garflas, Byron Gigoux,
Emilio Hermansen, Raimundo
Infante, Ricardo Irarrazaval,
Juana Lecaros, Magdalena Lo
zano, Alfredo Luco. Fernando
Marcos, Carmen Silva and Mon
lca Soler Vlcens.
Kiplinger Editor
Sees Eden's Fall
Warren Mullln, foreign editor
of the Kiplinger Letters, pre
dicted yesterday Great Britain’s
role in the Middle East crisis
will lead to the resignation or
defeat of Prime Minister Eden.
Mr. Mullln said he believes the
United Nations will be able to
bring about a truce in the area.
The Mideast situation is the
U. N.’s "greatest test.” he said,
because lt comes when the or
ganization is at its "weakest
point.”
“If the U. N. can bring the
present crisis to a truce,” Mr.
Mullln continued, “it has become
a giant. I really think that this
time lt is going to work.”
Mr. Mullln spoke before a
meeting of the Women’s Inter
national League tor Peace and
Freedom at Davis House. 1822
R street N.W,
More Hungarians
Believed Deported
Mr tht Auoclttnl Pr*M
Reliable reports reaching
Washington said that Hungarian
rebels are being deported to the
Soviet Union over railway lines
running through Romania.
Hungarian Premier Janos*
Kadar claimed earlier this week
at Budapest that he had reached
an agreement with Boviet mili
tary authorities that "no one
may be deported.”
The reports available here in
dicate the deportations were
continued at least late into the
week.
Some officials have estimated
on the basis of available infor
mation. including press' reports
from Budapest, that between
10.000 and 20.000 Hungarians,
have been shipped oil to Russia
as part of the Soviet military
campaign to smash the anti
communist revolution.
must be continued for collectivi
zation of agriculture.”
Mr. Mikolajczyk, now chair
man of the International Peas
ants Union, told the committee
staff that Mr. Gomulka is offer
ing some apparent “liberaliza
tions” such as a promise of free
elections because of the strong
popular opposition to Commu
nists. One such move, he said,
was the “window dressing” re
moval of Soviet-trained Marshal
Konstantin Rokossovsky as de
fense minister. But the Polish
government that took over a
month ago is still firmly in the
hands of Soviet representatives,
he insisted.
As a refugee from Poland since
1947 he has spent much time
. in this country but frequently!
! goes to Europe to keep in closer
touch with conditions in Poland.
He returned several days ago
! from Paris. |
Now You Can Buy the Finer
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District Flyer
Safe in Crash
A Washington Air Force lieu
; tenant parachuted to safety with
his flight Instructor last night
when the Jet trainer they were
in crashed near Roanoke, Va.,
after losing radio communica
tion in an instrument landing
approach.
Second Lt. Hubert G. King, Jr.,'
Ison of Mr. and Mrs. Hubert G
King of 3641 Warren street N.W.,; 1
was unhurt. The flight instruc-j
tor, Ist Lt. R. Hermanson, suf-jj
sered a possible ankle sprain.
The plane cut down three trees
and exploded debris over a five- i
acre area when it crashed into!
the side of a hill.
Lt. King, a native Washingto
nian who was graduated from
George Washington University
in June, 1955, landed in a tree,
according to his father, a law- ;
yer. People at a nearly house 1
took him to town. His compan
ion landed about five miles i
away. 3
The plane was one of three
two-place T-33 jet trainers trav- 1
leling from Webb Air Force Base, I
Tex., where Lt. King is stationed, <
to Langley Air Force Base, Va. 1
The plane went down about 190
miles from Langley. il
Suspect Seized I
In Theft of D. C.
Greyhound Bus
An Alabaman, arrested yester
day in Hollywood, Calif., was
charged with stealing a Grey
hound bus here last April, thus :
stranding its load of Daughters
of the American Revolution.
The D. A. R. delegation was
from Kansas City, here for their ,
| annual convention. (
Federal Bureau of Investiga- ;
tion'agents identified the man:
I yesterday as Norris Albert Ham- j
jilton, 30. alias Norris Albert l '
[Smith. They said he was a na- ;
tive of Centre, Ala. He has been ,
living in Hollywood.
The bus thief was wearing a
Greyhound uniform when he!,
stole the bus from the terminal
here. j
The charter vehicle from Kan- ,
sas City was abandoned in Or- '
lando a few minutes after the '
lookout alarm reached there.
The man driving it coolly asked 1
for a salary advance, and bowed .
out when officials began ques
tioning him. 1
He showed as much aplomb i
here when he took the bus. i
Jet Crashes, Kills Three,
Burns $6 Million B-47s
LINCOLN, Nebr. Nov. 17 \
A Jet fighter plane landing at|
the Lincoln Air Force basei
smashed into two parked B-47 1
bombers tonight, killing three
persons and destroying nearly
$6 million worth of aircraft.
The dead included the fighter;
pilot, who apparently mistook a
taxi-way ramp for the runway l
which parallels it while practic-i
ing landings and takeoffs, and:
two airmen who were in or
around the B-47s when the.
crashes touched off a holocaust!,
;of fuel-fed flames.
Seven other airmen were in-i
jured. at least one seriously.
Jet fuel from the aircraft;
burst into flames immediately!
and billowing flames vaulted
high into the sky.
The injured men all suffered I
burns. Two were reported in
serious condition at the Lincoln j
Veterans’ hospital. Two others ,
were hospitalized at the base 1
with minor burns and three were i
treated for superficial burns and <
released.
The F-80 fighter pilot killed (
Depot officials said he even'
offered to give several mechanics '
a ride home. <
| was identified as 2nd Lt. Robert
■ L. Young of Lincoln, a member
1 of the Nebraska Air National
Guard.
Lt. Col. Dale Tintsman of the!
Air National Guard said most:
members of the Guard squadron
I stationed at the Lincoln base 1
[were in Casper. Wyo., for week
end gunnery practice. The ill-!
i fated F-80 and pilot had re-j
jmained behind.
Lt. Young, about 23. was mar-1
ried last March and had recently
[completed jet aircraft training.
jHatoyama Approves
U. S. Base Expansion
TOKYO. Nov. 17 OP).—Prime
Minister Ichiro Hatoyama told
Socialist questioners in the Diet
•■parliament) today “I have no
intention of asking the United
States to halt projected expan
sion of military bases in this
country.”
He apparently wa; referring!
to plans for extending runways'
of five United States air bases
to make them capable of han
dling modern jet planes. 1
Annandale Boy, 15,
Accidentally Shot
A 15 - year -old Annandale
(Va.) boy was accidentally shot
’ in the head last night with a .22
caliber rifle he got last Christ
mas. His condition is critical.
Robert Wayne Curry, son of
Mr. and Mrs. George L. Curry of
917 East Estabrook drive was
i taken to Alexandria Hospital
with the bullet lodged behind his •
Benny £
Jack and .
all the gang V ]
TONIGHT \ |
i I
:30 \
CHANNEL ynJL
9 K
Presented by LUCKY STRIKE
right eye after hitting him be*
tween the eyes.
Relatives said the boy was
alone Jn his bedroom when the
accident occurred. His mother,
two brothers, a sister and hia
great-grandmother were in the
house at the time.
The father of the Annandale
High School student had not
been reached at Woodstock,
where he had gone hunting. Mr.
Curry is a plasterer.

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