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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 31, 1959, Image 37

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dear~abby7~. ' A
By ABIGAIL VAN BUREN
V/ants Control of Her Dollar
DEAR ABBY: I am 11 years
old and get $1 a week al
lowance but 1 might as well
get nothing because I have
to put It all In the bank. My
girl friend gets 50 cents a
week but she can do anything
she wants with It. Don’t you
think persons should be able
to do what they want with
their allowance? If I had my
way I’d save most of it any
way because I have been
taught to save. I know what
you are going to say but I
want my parents to see it.
| DOLLAR ALLOWANCE.
1 When a child is given SI
a week with instructions to
bank it all—that is not an
"allowance.” An allowance (if
only a quarter a week) is
money which the person is
allowed to spend or save, as
he chooses. If children are to
learn how to budget, save and
spend money properly, they
should be given the oppor
tunity to handle it them
selves.
** * *
DEAR ABBY: Please tell
that young lady who is so
Worried because she dreams
about her old boy friends not
to lose any sleep over it. I’m a
grandmother and I have
asked Frank Sinatra to put
his arms around me and hold
frv STOP KILLING
IgL yourself
By DR, PETER J STEINCROHN
Problems of Youngsters
* DEAR DR. STEINCROHN:
My son, now five years old,
was born with two hernias.
At the age of 9 months, one
side strangulated and gan
grene set in. It was corrected
by surgery and at the age
of two he had the second
operation.
The next two years there
followed severe tonsillitis,
removal of tonsils, a near at
tack of rheumatic fever.
During the past year chronic
bronchitis has been the main
trouble. He coughs constant
ly, and for the past six
months he gets so choked up
now and again that he
wheezes and breathes hard.
Some nights he becomes blue
because he can’t catch his
breath when coughing.
He Is irritable and cries
easily. We stand by helpless.
The doctors say he will even-
Ually outgrow the condition
—that it has been brought
on by so much illness and
nervousness. My greatest
coneern now is that he has
asthma. If so, shouldn’t we
have him put through a
complete investigation? Is
asthma curable? Does it
cause enlargement of the
heart?
We have considered chang
ing climate. But three doc
tors say that with his chronic
condition he would be both
ered anywhere. However, I
notice that his condition is
especially bad during damp
weather. We would appreci
ate your opinion. MRS. G.K.
FIRST, DIAGNOSIS is es
sential. Have your pediatri
cian refer your son to an al
lergist. Whether it is asthma
or isn’t (if medicine doesn’t
help) by all means try a
change of climate. Don’t con
cern yourself about heart en
largement. I believe that you
and you only deserve the op
portunity for improvement
that a “new” climate offers
many cases of chronic lung
infection.
** * *
MANY PARENTS are con
LAW IN THE NEWS
State Rulings Vary
On Jobless Pay
By PHIL YEAGER and
JOHN STARK
Special Writer* lor The Star
It isn’t often that two State
courts will hand down dia
metrically opposing decisions
at the same time, but this
happened recently in Mary
land and Pennsylvania.
The Maryland Court of
Appeals ordered the State to
pay benefits to Mary Fino. a
waitress'who was fired when
she invoked the Fifth Amend
ment and refused to tell a
congressional committee
whether or not she had been
a Communist. The miscon
duct in question, ruled the
court, had nothing to do with
her work.
But a Pennsylvania steel
mill employe was denied
benefits in somewhat similar
circumstances, when the
court held that the employer
had a right to know of any
Communist connections he
had—and the employe’s fail
ure to answer his boss yes-or
no added up to misconduct
under the unemployment
compensation laws.
These cases point up the
fact that rights to unemploy
ment benefits vary from State
to State. Virtually all juris
dictions deny benefits when
employes are fired for mis
conduct, but they vary a
good deal in the strictness
with which they define mis
conduct.
t> *
me tight and tell me that he
loved me. I promised In my
dreams that I would be his
slave. I could -go on and on.
but I Just want to say. Abby,
that dreams don’t mean a
thing. My old grandpa Is
really the only one for me—
when I’m awake.
GRANDMA.
** * *
DEAR ABBY: I met a guy
In civilian clothes and fell
for him. I found out later he
was a Marine. I like him
much better in civilian cloth
ing. When he shows up In his
uniform it spoils everything
for me because I don’t like
him in that uniform. To tell
the truth It brings back mem
ories about the time I was
young and foolish in Quantl
co, Va„ and I’d rather forget
it. Should I ask him to wear
civilian clothes all the time
or not?
LIKES CIVIES.
Don’t knock his uniform
unless you are willing to tell
him why. If this man plans
a career in the Marine Corps,
you’d better land a civilian
if you intend to keep the th
at ion in hand.
** * *
DEAR ABBY: We have
ren married for 15 years.
am 50 and my wife Is 40.
She will not go anywhere <
cemed about their child’s
poor posture. Round shoul
ders is the most common
thing they complain about.
The writer of today’s letter
answers a woman who ex
pressed herself In a recent
column as worried about her
daughter’s posture.
He says: “My advice to
this mother Is to get off the
kid’s back. From my own ex
perience I would say that the
biggest single cause of slouch
ing is inferiority feelings. The
girl slouches to be as un
obtrusive as possible. Nag
ging, of course, only makes
the problem worse.
“First, convince the child of
her importance to her family
and friends. There’s time
enough for medical treatment
later. Even a person with a
weak back will stand tall if he
is proud of himself.
“Lack of self respect is at
the root of many health prob
lems. Can anyone answer the
question which came first—
the emotional or physical
problem?
“The old country doctor
didn’t save as many patients
as doctors today, but I think
he saved more souls by treat
ing the patient instead of the
disease.
“Not being rich, I had to be
my own psychologist. At the
age of 28 I still don’t have all
such problems solved. But I
am on the road. I fought off
a bad family situation, and
the engineering profession has
paved the way to realizing the
full potential of my own
talents.
“I have quit worrying about
other peoples’ opinions—and
I am concentrating on meet
ing my own standards. I have
traded morals for ethics—
which are Invariably higher.
“In the process I am licking
the posture problem—in spite
of a set of weak points and
flat feet.” Mr. L. E. H.
(Released by the Bell Syndicate, Inc I
Tomorrow: 01’ Doc kicked the
tirej.
Moreover, some States deny
benefits to an employe who
quits. Technically he must be
laid off. Unsuspecting em
ployes often learn this, to
; their sorrow after quitting.
A Minneapolis motion picture
projectionist named Ansom
who worked for the Fisher
Amusement Corporation was
told by his union that he
would have to make way for
a member with greater sen
iority. Obligingly, Anson quit,
then learned that this “vol
[ untary separation” barred his
unemployment benefits.
Conversely, just a few days
i ago the New York Court of
> Appeals in Albany ruled that
a woman who quit her job to
( get married was entitled to
[ unemployment benefits. In a
5 to 2 decision the court de
; cided that Mrs. Keith Shaw
of North Tonawanda was still
in the labor market. It agreed
! with a lower court which had
ruled that marriage “ought
to be treated as illness or
; other events of important
’ personal consequence to the
worker.”
So there you are. It would
seem a good idea to know
your State unemployment in
surance program. It might
1 make a big difference if you
lose your job or quit for one
' reason or another.
i
Tomorrow: Do women tell more
falsehoods?
t
with me because I am getting
bald. When we go out for a
long ride she falls asleep. We
have no children and she
doesn't work. When I come
home at night we have sup
per. After that she lies down
till about 10. Then she gets
up and sets her hair and then
she checks all the locks on
the doors and comes to bed.
She tells me that we are too
old for affection and I should
not bother her. I have never
cheated on her. Do you think
I am crazy?
NEGLECTED
How long have you been
putting up with this? I am
not qualified to pass Judg
ment on anyone’s mental
state, but if you have any
doubts, you ought to see a
doctor. And take your wife
with you.
** * *
Want to be popular? Get
ABBY’S booklet. "What
Every Teenager Wants to
Know.” Send 25 cents and
a large, self-addressed en
velope to ABBY, care of The
Evening Star.
** * *
For a personal reply, write
to ABBY in care of The Eve
ning Star. Inclose a self
addressed, stamped envelope.
(Distributed by McNauaht Syndicate, Inc.)
FAMOUS FABLES
By E. E. EDGAR
CONSOLATION Some
years ago, Writer Christopher
Morley was delivering a lec
ture in a Cleveland Audi
torium. Suddenly, in the
middle of his speech, the
. occupants of the last two
rows stood up, faced to the
right and with military pre
cision marched into the aisle
and out of the hall. A mo
ment later, the people in the
next two rows followed suit.
In less than two minutes,
half of the seats were empty.
The exodus continued. Mor
ley, his face a picture of
pain and disbelief, swayed
slightly and grasped the lec
tern for support.
Suddenly a man came
dashing out of the wings.
“Mr. Morley,” he cried ex
citedly, “the house is on fire!”
In a flash, the color came
back into the writer’s cheeks.
“Thank goodness,” he mut
tered, with evident relief. “I
thought it was me.”
MARRIAGE
LICENSE
APPLICATIONS
Under D C. law couples
must apply for a marriage
license on one day. wait three
full days and receive the
license on the fifth day. Sun
days and holidays are counted
the same as other days.
George D. Berry, 31, 1135 4<fth st.
s.e., and Betty A. Sutton, 22, 4002
E st. s.e
Ralph R. Taguba, 24, 1824 O st* n.w.,
and Erllnda Maranan. 24, 1810 37th
st. n w.
Walter M. Wondrack, 30, 3811 Benton
st. ti w . and Dorothy C. Jones, 26,
1727 28th st. s.e.
Joseph T. Lundy. 27, and Ona P.
Wright. 22, both of 1428 21st st.
n.w.
Elward Bynum. 30, 5920 2nd pi. n w.,
and Barbara A. Stewart, 22, 3307
22nd st. n.e
William V. Audla, 28, 1811 Monroe st.
n.e., and Alma K. Btevens, 20. 917
Vamum st. n.e.
Robert A. Hartji. 26. and Betty L.
MeMnger, 21, both of East Orange,
N. J.
Terry A Barton. 21, Alexandria, Va .
and Marilyn G. Bauer, 23, 2439 P
st. n.w.
Thomas J. Bonte, 25. and Janet E
Daughtrey. 21, both of the Naval
Air Station.
Nell J Lynch. 24. and Frankie C.
Sparks. 21. both of 825 New Hamp
shire ave. n.w.
Earl D. Beauchamp. 20, Arlington. Va.,
and Julia E. Smallwood, 10, Hern
don. Va.
Edward Tonti. 33, 636 East Capitol st
and Mary Richardson, 38, 419 East
Capitol st.
Anthony Kenosian. 43. Adelphia. Md.,
and Margaret E. Eaton, 32, Arling
ton, Va.
Port Workers Strike
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina,
Mar. 31 <AP).—Workers in the
Buenos Aires port area yester
day went on strike for 48 hours
for more pay. Loading and
unloading operations on more
than 200 ships were at a
standstill.
Bugeyed Male 'Jurors'
Okay Nighties in Case
SAN FRANCISCO, Mar. 31 i
(AP) —Three hundred bug
eyed customers, 30 newsmen
and photographers, a bail
bondsman, a lawyer and police
men in plain clothes were the
jury.
The defendant? A lingerie
show in a finance district bar
and restaurant, with four
shapely models.
The verdict? Legally accept
able.
The proprietor, Robert P.
Bryant, initiated the fashion
show recently to stimulate his
Tiki Bob's luncheon business,
i Police Chief Thomas Cahill
threatened to close the estab
lishment.
The show went on—as sched
uled—yesterday. Tiki Bob.
smiling appreciatively at the
standing room only crowd,
stood by with his attorney and
a bondsman, who held a $20.-
000 bail bond at the ready.
The young ladies wore baby
doll hip-length pajamas and
nebulous nighties of other
styles. Afterward. Chief Cahill
;announced his agents reported;
lit was all morally okay. But he
Feature Page
TRUE LIFE ADVENTURES -iyW.it Di.ney
An ELEPHANT tumbles into a pit.
HE SEEMS HOPELESSLV TRAPPED, TOR HE CAWNOT
CLIMB THE VERTICAL V4ALLS. BUT HELP IS AT HANC2
OTHERS OF THE HERJ7 TRAMPLE DOWN THE EARTH
AROUNP THE ECkfiß OF THE HOLE....
Called Wrong Turn,
Liner's Captain Says
NEW YORK.Mar. 31 (AP).—
The captain of the Grace liner
Santa Rosa testified yesterday
that “in all probability” he
could have avoidedfa collision
with the tanker Valchem by
turning right. Instead of left.
The international rules of the
road, a navigational code, re
quire that ships on a collision
course turn to the right (star
board), so that they will pass
port to port (left to left).
The tanker did turn right,
according to testimony at the
hearing.
The ships collided In fog
about 22 miles off Atlantic City,
N. J., last Thursday morning
A gash was ripped in the liner’s
bow. The engine room of the
tanker was hit, causing the
death of four of the 39 crew
men aboard.
Hearing Continues
The Coast Guard hearing
Continues today.
Liner Capt. Frank S. Siwik
told the Coast Guard Investi
gating board that when it
became apparent the two ships
would pass close together he
relied on speed to avoid col
lision.
He said that a few minutes
before the crash, which oc
curred at 3 a.m., fog was clos
ing in rapidly and visibility was
less than a quarter of a mile.
The liner was making a top
speed of 21.5 knots. It carried
247 passengers.
Capt. Siwik said he glanced
at the radarscope and saw the
two ships approaching almost
head on, and they would ap
parently pass starboard to
starboard at less than three
tenths of a mile.
Rather than turn across the
course of the approaching
ship, he ordered hard-left
rudder, but did not call for a
reduction in speed, he said.
“I thought with my speed I
could get away from the fellow
on my starboard side,” he said.
“When I picked his light out
he (the tanker) was on my
starboard side about six degrees
off my bow at between a quar
ter and a half mile.”
Clear the Stern
He said that just before the
impact he ’saw that the, other
ship had turned, and he or
dered hard-right rudder In
hopes the Santa Rosa could
clear the tanker’s stern.
After the 50-year-old captain
told of ordering the left turn
three minutes before the crash,
he was asked:
“Instead of going left at ap
proximately 2:57 a.m„ had you
gone right would you have
avoided a collision?”
“In all probability,” he re
plied.
The rules of the road require
that vessels in fog proceed at
moderate speed, which is de
fined as that speed which will
said he would keep a close
watch on the show.
He explained nighties and
baby doll pajamas were accept
able at noon showings of femi
nine lingerie.
But, he declared, bras and
girdles would not be.
Tiki Bob originally sched
uled the fashion show for
Tuesday. Last week he added
Monday and Wednesday. After
yesterday’s ’turnout, he plans
to continue Monday through
Friday.
Surveying the mashed males
—who somehow recalled the
recent telephone booth people
packing incidents—Mr. Bryant
commented:
“I’m just lucky, I guess.”
RENT TV
21" Screen
Brand-New
(OPTION TO BUT)
Beacon TV Rental
I_AD. 4-4688
allow a vessel to stop com
pletely in half the distance of
the existing visibility.
Capt. Louis Murphy of the
Valchem testified briefly. He
said he had been resting in his
cabin when he heard the liner’s
whistle. He said he rushed to
the bridge, arriving seconds
before the collision, but too late
to do anything. He said, “I
actually never saw the Santa
Rosa prior to the impact.”
Nevada Tops
Per Capita
Tax List
By the Associated Press
Nevada collected more taxes
on a per capita basis than any
other State last year, the Cen
sus Bureau reports.
Nevada collected $140.66 for
every man, woman and child
in the State, compared with
$137.38 for the runnerup State
of Washington. New Mexico
was third with per capita tax
revenues of $130.05.
New Jersey had the smallest
per capita tax revenue—ssl.4s.
Nebraska was next with $57.04.
followed by New Hampshire
with $61.09.
On the per capita spending
side Delaware outranked ail
the States. Its general expendi-
I tures figured out to $268.26 for
each Inhabitant. Wyoming was
second at $263.79 and New Mex
ico third at $242.17.
California received the
largest amount of revenue from
the Federal Government last
year—more than $547 million.
Next came New York at nearly
$304 million and Texas $265
million.
Delaware received the small
est amount from the Govern
ment—about $lO million. Ver
mont got nearly sl3 million
and New Hampshire $16.5
million.
Maryland and Virginia both
ranked between the extremes in
all categories. Maryland’s per
capital tax revenue was $87.28
and Virginia’s $67.10. On per
capita spending, Maryland’s
total was $140.63 per person
and Virgia’s $118.34.
Os the amounts received from
the Federal Government, Mary
land’s share was listed at $51.9
million and Virginia’s was $51.7
million.
Revenues were up in 44
States while spending was up
In 45, the report said. Forty
four States increased their
outstanding debt during the
year.
State spending totaled about
S2B billion. Revenue was ,just
above $26 billion. State ‘debt
outstanding amounted to nearly
$15.5 billion.
Republican Women
To Hear President
President Eisenhower will
speak at the seventh anniver
sary dinner of the Republican
Women’s Conference at the
Statler-Hilton Hotel the night
of April 13, the White House
announced today.
On the morning of April 14,
Press Secretary James C. Hag
lerty said, the President will
participate in dedication cere
monies for the Robert A. Taft
memorial bell tower on Capi
tal Hill.
I
WANNA m
GET /
MARRIED •
LISTEN TO BILL MALONE
ON TEMPO 6 TO 9 EVERY
MORNING THIS WEEK ON j
WMAL-RADIO 63
FAMILY COUNCIL
Confidence
Can't Be Put
Into Anyone
THE PROBLEM
Evelyn K.—D ic k needs
things to give him confidence.
Victor K.—But sports would
be better than music.
THE DETAILS
Evelyn K.—Our oldest boy,
Richard, 11. is the size of the
average 8-year-old. In fact,
his 8-year-old sister is 2
inches taller. There are very
Tli* Family Council coniitti of a
judge, a psychiatrist, three clergy
men, a newspaper uditor, u wom
en's editor and two writers. Each
artida it a summary of an actval
cat* history. The council reports
on problems that hare been dealt
with by responsible agencies and
counselors.
short people m both our
families and the doctor says
that Dick's bone structure
leads him to think the boy
never will reach average
height.
I feel Dick needs things to
help give him confidence. He
is not up to par in sports,
so I am trying to get him
to study a musical instru
ment. His teacher says he is
quite musical, but he refuses
to practice. This is partly
because of my husband’s at
titude. He laughs and says
I’ll give Dick worse problems
if I try to make a longhair
out of him, too.
Victor K.—l’d have noth
ing against Dick's studying
music if Evelyn didn’t make
such a production out of it.
She wouldn't let him go to
the ordinary music school
that all the kids in our com
munity attend. She started
him with one of the top
teachers in a nearby city.
This man didn’t even want
to take Dick because he
mainly teaches advanced stu
dents. but Evelyn talked him
into it.
In my opinion, this man
gives Dick too tough a work
out and that’s why he doesn’t
want to practice. He doesn’t
like the exercises he is given,
but he does enjoy popular
music and can pick this up by
ear. Why make him be a
longhair if he doesn't want
to be?
I think that Dick would be
better off anyhow if he con
centrated on sports. He’s
pretty strong and agile In
spite of his size, and is a fair
ball player. I feel that sports
will help him grow. Anyway,
he'll be able to meet the other
boys on their own ground.
THE COUNCIL’S VIEW
Evelyn and Victor are mak
ing the same basic mistake.
They want to stuff their boy
with confidence because they
feel he has a serious short
coming.
But confidence cannot be
put into anyone. It has to
come from within. And one
way it grows from within is
as a result of the parents’ at
titude. To a great extent the
child’s attitude toward him
self is a reflection of his par
ents’ attitude —or what he be
lieves is his parents’ attitude.
The world is full of sto
ries about short men who
made history, but what is
lacking is the story of their
home life. If their parents
had regarded them as de
fective, it is doubtful that
many would have had the
courage to go into the world
and prove themselves. Surely,
behind all of those men
were parents or other rela
tives who thought of them
as capable, clever, persistent
or endowed with other vir
tues.
Evelyn and Victor need to
show their boy that they
have confidence in his quali
ties. These are the qualities
that will help him deal with
the world. They should not
make him feel that he needs
various props to save him
from his inadequacies. He
may feel this himself and
he will find his own props
with a little encouragement
from his parents, but he'll
balk if he is made to feel
that his parents expect him
to put forth a particularly
big effort to make up for a
particular defect.
(CopjrUht 106!). General Feature!
Corp.)
Tomorrow: Schoolboy marriages.
DRAFT NOTICE
GOES TO RFC
HONOLULU (AP). —An
Annapolis (Md.) draft
board has notified James
R. Andrews that he is clas
sified 1-A.
Mr. Andrews got the word
yesterday at Schofield Bar
racks, where he's been a
private first class in the
27th Infantry Wolfhounds
for several months.
THE EVENING STAR
Washington, D. C., Tuesday, March 31, 1959
All Pricts in This Ad Ar« Effective All Wssk—
From Tuesday Thru Monday
You SAYS MORI at
Hfl I I DISCOUNT I
LJJj DRUGS,
\ W / NOW 2 LOCATIONS
\ JT| ! TO SERVE YOU
• UPTOWN • I a DOWNTOWN •
DISCOUNT DRUGS STATE DISCOUNT DRUBS
5317 WlscMtiii Avs. N.W. 1151 Fima. Avs. N.W.
IM. 3-3466 k|A o o/a (iiiootwiST
FREE PARKING IN A. 0-*t3o(J OF wmiti HOUIt)
Store Nauru S AM. 10 P.M. I Store Mount 7 A.M. S7 M.
WASHINGTON'S ONLY 100%
DISCOUNT DRUG STORE
WHERE [l/EDV 'TEM IS
DISCOUNTED IVLIU DAY
I Reg. $l.O0 —51 Gauge, 15 Denier a
I <££, NYLONS si 3V; |
PHOTO SPECIALS
20% OFF DEVELOING
30%
WESTINGHOUSE SM WkWRm '
FLASH BULBS
Sleeve of 12. Reg. $1.92 MM
$10.95 Brownie Star Flash QQ
CAMERA OUTFIT
Bulbs, film, batteries. Complete mm
Buy the Brand of YOUR Choice!
MTAIIIS & PRESGRIPTIOHS
II lii M OFF!
=3 FOR 2=
On an average, we will fill 3 prescriptions for what you
would ordinarily pay for 2. Bring your next prescription
to us or have your doctor phone EM. 3-3466 or NA. 8-4360.
~REG. 1 -LB. Cft I
Whitman's Sampler I* |
ALL TIMEX WATCHES)
40% OFF!
$6.95 Men's or Ladies', $4.17
SI.OO BUBBLE BATH (in APOTHECARY JAR)... 87c
VITAMINS AT DEEP DISCOUNTS
UNIDAY or UNIDEC =|
Superior One-A-Day Formula
100's 300's 1000's
s|l3 $919 . S99S
PARKE-DAVIS
5.40 Paladec. pint 2.99
50cc ABDEC Vitamin Dropt 2,11
9.67 Myadec, 100$ -4.99
ABBOTT
6.00 Dayaiets, 100$ 3.47
10.50 Optilets a--. 6.24
4.20 Vi-Doylin, pint 2.83
LILLY
5.08 Multicebrin, 100$ 2.96
4.77 Trinsicon, 60$ 3.38
UPJOHN
3.11 Unicaps, 100 --.1.68
6.96 Zymacaps 4.38
SQUIBB
9.89 Tharagran M 1959 Formulo Hard Caps, 100$ 4.99
MEAD .
3.29 Tri-Vi-Sol, 50cc 1.93
3.69 Poly-Vi-Sol, 50ec - - 2.11
rrriTrr before:— - za
Reg. S4.72—PARKE-DAVIS Oft
NATABEC 1
15c Carton of 50 4 4 C
BOOK MATCHES 11
98c Super Anahist Cough Syrup (4 ez.) p
98c Super Anahist Nasal Spray
98c Super Anahist Tablets (20’$)_ vU
25 c SHOWER CAPS 9°
69c POLIDENT i| OC
DENTURE CLEANSER IfZ
98 c Q-TIPS -•f 180) 67*
98' ETIQUETTE Q7c I
Deodorant % M
Stick, Spray or Cream ■
B-17

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