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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 15, 1961, Image 4

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THE SUNDAY STAR
Wosbiogtu, O. C„ January 15, 1961
HIADUNE PERSONALITY
. New Army Secretary
Is a Lawyer. Scholar
MORGANTOWN, W. Va.,
Jan? 14 (AP).—ln a word, Elvis
J. Stahr, Jr., is a brain.
BUt you should see him on
the sidelines rooting for the
favorite team.
He is a scholar, and a bril
liant one. At 44, he already has
mastered more academic
heights than most men scale
in a lifetime.
Today, President-elect Ken
nedy selected him to.be Secre
tary of the Army.
?e is a handsome man. His
portraits suggest a publicity re
lease from a touring troupe.
But he has that scholarly
slouch that borders on hunched
shoulders from bending over
books.
Mr. Stahr was born in Hick
man. Ky. During his under
graduate work at the Univer
sity of Kentucky, he compiled
the highest scholastic record in
the school's history. He easily
made Phi Beta Kappa and
earned a Rhodes scholarship.
This entitled him to three years
at-Oxford University in Eng
larfd, where he earned three
degrees, a Bachelor of Arts,
Bachelor of Civil Law and
Master of Arts.
Five Years in Army
After receiving his law de
gree, he was with a New York
law firm for eight years—with
time out for the Army during
World War H, including two
years overseas duty in the Far
East. He was commissioned a
second lieutenant in 1940 and
came out a lieutenant colonel
in 1945.
In 1947 he joined the Ken- ■
tucky faculty as associate pro- {
fessor of law. A year later he ‘
was appointed professor and
dean of the law college and he
was named one of the 10 out- ;
standing men of America. On '
the Selection Committee was
Dwight D. Eisenhower.
During the Korean War he
took a leave of absence to go 1
to the Pentagon as a special
assistant to Secretary of the
Army Frank Pace, Jr.
In 1954 he returned to the
University of Kentucky as pro
vost.
Heads W. Va. University
Two years later he became
executive director of the Presi
dent’s Committee on Education
Beyond the High School. And
a year later he became vice
chancellor of the University of
Pittsburgh.
From Pittsburgh he was
named president of West Vir
ginia University early in 1959.
Even though he chose the
library over the ball field dur-
U. S. Bureaucratic
Secrecy Charged
TUCSON, Aris., Jan. 14 (AP).
—4* Florida editor said today
mushrooming bureaucracy has
a stifling curtain of
seegecy over all the Executive
Branch of Federal Government.
Managing editor Virgil M.
(Rpd) Newton, jr„ of the
Tampa (Fla.) Tribune told the
Newspaper Association
he-is not optimistic about the
jmjnediate outlook.
In Tucson to receive the
University of Arizona’s annual
John Peter Zenger Freedom of
the -Press Award, Mr. Newton
said the freedom of information
outlook is improving on the
city, county and State levels
of. -Government across the
Natlpn.
*!But the Federal bureaucracy
at' Washington, which today
places a restraining finger upon 1
every phase of living and every
Anjsrican citizen, is positively
overwhelming,” he said.
*jThe facts of our Govern
ment are denied to the people,
ths .Congress, the press and
even the General Accounting
Office, which is our auditing
restraint upon bureaucratic
spending.”
* a..
Water Conversion
Plant Opens Soon
FREEPORT. Tex., Jan. 14
(Aj l ).—The Nation's first com
mercial sea water conversion
plaint erected for the Federal
Office of Saline Water is sched
ule to start operating on
Mar£h 24.
The plant, one of five the
agency is building, will pro
duce a million gallons of fresh
water daily.
Pipe is being laid to the city
of Freeport, which will buy half
the water at 20 cents per 1,000
gallons. Dow Chemical Co. in
Freeport is to purchase the
other half at 30 cents a thou
sand.
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FULL NAME Elvis Jacob
Stahr, jr.
CLAIM TO FAME—Named Sec
retary of tha Army by Fresi
dant-alact Kennedy.
HOME—Morgantown, W. Vo,
BIRTHDAY—March 9, 1916
EDUCATlON—University of Ken- <
techy and Oxford University
under Rhodes Scholarship.
JOlS—Lawyer in New York, Dean
of law college end later pro
vost of University of Ken
tucky, spacial assistant to Army
secretary, vice chancellor at
University of Pittsburgh, presi
dent of West Virginia Uni
versity.
FAMlLY—Married former Dorothy
Holland Barkfield; they have
a daughter and two sons.
HOBBIES—Sports enthusiast.
ing his undergraduate years, he
is quite a sports fan.
When he came to West Vir
ginia, for example, he was
asked his views on the athletic
program there.
“I don’t want the mountain
eers to ever be doormat for
anybody," he said flatly.
At West Virginia, he was the
highest paid administrator in
the university’s history. His
annual pay check amounted to
130,000, plus a few incidentals.
This is 88,000 more than the
amount paid to the educator
he succeeded. He has been
granted a leave of absense to
take the Pentagon post.
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Pro-Lumumba
Troops Quit
Belgian Area
USUMBURA, Ruanda-Urundi,
Jan. 14 (AP).—A midget war
launched by about 40 Congolese
soldiers from the pro-Lumumba
garrison of Kivu province was
reported ended today with their
retreat from Ruanda-Urundi
under the scouting runs 6f a
Belgian helicopter.
A military spokesman an
nounced all is quiet in the
Belgian trust territory’s invaded
area north of Lake Kivu, which
marks part of the border be
tween the Congo and Ruanda-
Urundi.
Total casualties remain to be
determined.
"Belgian army units in
Kisenyi, where Congo troops
had crossed the border from
the Goma district, began mop
ping up operations against the
Congolese soldiers today," the
spokesman said, “but the Congo
troops withdrew as soon as an
army helicopter began recon
naissance over them.”
No Apparent Motive
Goma is a Kivu town on the
north shore of Lake Kivu.
Kisenyi is a Ruanda village on
the northeast shore.
United Nations reports from
Kivu, which is controlled by
the Stanleyville regime loyal to
deposed Premier Patrice Lu
mumba, said the Congolese de
tachment mounted the attack
in defiance of their dwn officers
and from no apparent motive.
Belgium protested in a note
to United Nations Secretary
General Dag Hammarskjold,
referring particularly to Con
golese fire into Kisenyi Thurs
day with automatic weapons
and mortars, "indiscriminately
day and night.”
The town, a tobacco and
dairying center once widely
known as a tourist resort, was
thronged with many Negro and
white refugees from Kivu. The
note said the civilian popula
tion was evacuated under fire.
Paratrooper Wounded
A Belgian paratrooper
wounded in the shelling was
brought to a hospital in Usum
bura, the Ruanda-Urundi cap
ital 100 miles south of Kisenyi.
Complicating the border re
lationships was a Belgian army
announcement that bight Bel
gian soldiers who strayed onto
Dayal Ouster Asked
By Congo Mission
LEOPOLDVILLE, The Con
go, Jan. 14 (AP). The Con
golese government today de
manded the withdrawal of Ra
jeshwar Dayal, Indian head of
the United Nations Congo mis
sion.
Foreign Minister Justin Bom
boko announced at a news con
ference that the demand was
made in a letter from Presi
dent Joseph Kasavubu to U. N.
Secretary General Dag Ham
marskjold.
Mr. Bomboko said U. N. in
activity during the Christmas
Day arrest of provincial min
isters in Bakavu, Kivu prov
ince, by troops backing deposed
Premier Patrice Lumumba was
tantamount to “complicity
with murder.”
The Congolese government
has charged that one of the
ministers seized in the raid,
Charles Rwakabubu, has since
died of torture.
A U. N. spokesman said Mr.
Dayal had no immediate com
ment.
Mr. Kasavubu’s letter ac
cused Mr. Dayal of partiality
toward the Lumumba rebels
who now have gained control
of more than one-third of the
Congo.
Disarming Asked »
He called for disarming of
all pro-Lumumba troops.
This might take some doing.
The problem is illustrated by
a fight yesterday at the tin
mining town of Manon, in
North Katanga.
a Kivu province road while
escorting a truckload of sup
plies to the frontier town of
Shangugu have been arrested
by the Congolese.
The supplies were confiscated
and the soldiers are being held
at Bukavu, the Kivu capital.
U. N. authorities have Deen
asked to negotiate for their
release.
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A U. N. spokesman told re
porters in Ellsabethville, the
Katanga capital, that a de
tachment of 200 U. N. troops
fought pro-Lumumba forces
for six hours and finally had
to ask for a cease-fire because
they were unable to hold the
Manono airfield. Among U. N.
casualties was a British major,
Frank Edge, who was reported
seriously wounded. Mr. Lu
mumba remain imprisoned at
Thysville. the army garrison
town, southwest of Leopold
ville.
The Government clammed
up on details of a pay day riot
yesterday, which got Mr. Lu
mumba temporarily out of the
cell he has occupied since
Dec. 2.
Proposal Opposed
What seems to have hap
pened was this:
Congolese military police—
NOTICE
This is to announce
the newly elected officers of
JOHN SHARPER, INC.
at
5821 BRINKLEY RD. S.E.
OXON HILL, MD.
ALBERT F. SHARPER, President
CHARLES R. SHARPER, Treasurer
HELEN L SHARPER, Secretary.
Business will continue as usual
without any change in policy.
and their wives—started dem
onstrating because they do not
get a$ much money as the elite
corps of commandos.
Specifically they objected to
a government proposal to pay
them 50 francs ($1) a week in
place of a food ration.
When the camp officers
failed to sympathize with the
protests, troops surrounded
them and locked them up.
Mr. Kasavubu and Col. Jos
eph Mobutu, the Army chief
flew from Leopoldville to Thyp
ville, 85 miles away.
The two leaders wer. greeted
with hostility—some reports
say thejr actually held in
detention.
For a short time Mr. Lumum
ba was let out of his cell. He
was never allowed to leave the
camp, however, and at no time
seemed in a position to assert
his demogogic magnetism.
Fast talking by Mr. Kasavu
bu and Mr. Mobutu, and a pro
visional agreement to reconsid
er the matter of wages calmed
the troops. By nightfall, the sit
uation was quiet.
Morton Will Join
Insurance Company
By th. Auocl.ted Preu
Assistant»Attorney General
Perry W. Morton said yester
day he will become second vice
president and associate general
counsel of the Massachusetts
Mutual Life Insurance Co.
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an insurance company attorney
in Lincoln for 17 years before
Joining the Elsenhower admin
istration.
DWIN

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