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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 15, 1961, Image 5

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Laos Reds Reported Hitting
Ta Vieng, Key Strategic Point
VIENTIANE, Loas, Jan. 14
(AP).— A pro-Communist unit
of undetermined size is attack
ing Ta Vieng, one of the stag
ing areas for the government’s
promised attack on rebel-held
Xieng Khouang province, ad
vices from the front said today.
There was an unconfirmed
report that Ta Vieng had fallen
to the Redd who seized two
villages in a sweep southward
from Xieng Khouang. But most
of the other information in
dicated Ta Vient still held.
Responsible Western military
experts said it is impossible to
determine just now whether the
attack is the start of a major
Communist push from strategic
Xieng Khouang or simply a
series of Isolated clashes.
Reds* Limited Alm
' If Paratroop Capt. Kong Le
and his pro-Communist Pathet
Lao allies have mounted an
offensive south, they said, it
probably has a limited alm of
knocking off balance the major
attack for which Premier Prince
Boun Oum’s regime has been
preparing in the Ta Vieng-Tha
Thom area northeast of Vien
tiane.
At last reports the government
had from 1,000 to 1,500 troops
at Ta Vieng and an even larger
force massing at Tha Thom.
Both are north of Paksane, on a
big bend of the Mekong River.
Pro-Communist forces cap
tured Xieng Khouang, with its
strategic complex of airstrips
on the Plaine des Jams, in
their year-end offensive.
Far to the West, loyal col
umns are striving to clear
rebels from the road between
Vientiane, the administrative
capital, and Luang Prabang,
the royal capital 140 miles to
the north.
Big Drive North
A 600-man force headed by
Col. Kouprasith Abhat has
smashed its way across the
Nam Lik River near Ban Hin
Heup and forged on northward
toward a linkup with royal
troops marching southward
from Luang Prabang.
Their Immediate goal is
Vang Vieng, a rebel-held vil
lage midway between the two
capitals. With 30 rugged road
miles still to cover, Kouprasith
said last night:
“I hope to take Vang Vieng
in two days—sooner if there
is no major resistance.”
A union between Koupra
sith’s men and the royal col
umn from Luang Prabang
would permit them to swing
east for a flanking drive into
Xieng Khouang province when
the promised major offensive
is mounted from the south.
Gulledge to Get
Senate Committee
„ Director's Post
William P. Gulledge, Senate
District Committee professional
staff director, will be the new
executive director of the Senate
Post Office and Civil Service
Committee, Senate sources re
ported yesterday.
He would succeed H.' w.
Brawley, who last week was
named by President-elect Ken
nedy to be Assistant Postmas
ter General in charge of de
partmental personnel matters.
News stories last week re
ported that Mr. Brawley, a
South Carolinian, would be suc
ceeded by an appointee from
that State. Both Mr. Gulledge
and Mr. Brawley are from
South Carolina, as is Chairman
Johnston of the Senate Post
Office and Civil Serfce Com
mittee.
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A Laotian soldier rests both his carbine and
his head on his pack while taking a catnap
in the village of Muong Soum, near Vang
Vieng, duringoperations against Communist
rebels.—AP Wirephoto.
Even Reds Work Better
For Roy Than Ideals
MOSCOW. Jan. 14 (AP)—
The Communist ideal of sup
plying everyone according to
his needs is being partly aban
doned here under pressure of
Premier Khrushchev’s thunder
bolts in favor of hard-headed
payment for excellence and
production.
The Soviet press disclosed
today that the old " idea
was soundly assailed by Mr.
Khrushchev today at a plenary
meeting of the Communist
Party Central Committee. The
committee is making an agon
izing examination of the short
comings of Soviet agriculture.
Erring regional leaders have
been • bowled over time after
time by Khrustchev interrup
tions.
(The classic idea of Marx
is: "From each according to
his abilities; to each according
to his needs.” Stalin and Lenin
both advanced their interpreta
tions. Mr. Khrushchev now may
be setting the stage for his own
Interpretation at a party con
gress summoned this fall to
propound a new view of Com
munist theory.)
Additional Pay Given -
Mr. Khrushchev’s assault on
traditionalism came during a
report by Y. N. Zarobyan.
chief of the Communist Party
In Soviet Armenia.
Mr. Zarobyan was telling
the meeting of "wonderfully
skilled” workers on his collec
tive and state farms. Mr.
Khrushchev broke in:
"Comrade Zarobyan, do these
people receive additional pay
or not?"
"They certainly do," replied
Mr. Zarobyan.
With a tone of some com
. plaint, Mr. Khrushchev con
tinued:
"No one (else) says anything
elsg about additional payment
for work. Do you want to build
communism only on moral sac-
tors? Moral factors are good,
but there must be a material
basis. A combination of these
factors creates a good condl- c
tion for progress.” c
Top Priority Given
Reports of this meeting of 1
leaders from 50 Soviet repub- i
lies and autonomous regions
are receiving top priority in t
the Soviet press. Pravda de- ‘
voted five of its six pages to J
them today. Tess said the (
meeting recessed this after- ‘
noon until Monday.
The stories Indicated that 1
the problem of boosting output .
is taking first place over more ,
theoretical questions. ,
For example, the Communist t
party chief of the Turkmen i
Republic suggested a law limit- i
Ing private cattle herds and <
said collective farms in his
area are not growing herds as
quickly as those produced on
farms owned by individual <
workers and others. Mr. Khru- 1
shchev commented: .
"You issue your law in your ,
republic on that question. Let I
other republics themselves <
work out adoption of such laws 1
as considered useful for 1
strengthening the output of
agriculture.” J
Pay for Production i
Ivan Kebln. first secretary ’
of the Estonian Party, reported .
that 70 per cent of the collec
tive farms in his republic are .
paying cash for specific pro
duction and have abandoned .
the baste principle of paying ,
the farmers for time alone.
Mr. Kebln said the new method ■
has had “a favorable effect on
the development of the collec
tive economy.”
Mr. Khrushchev also con- :
tinued pouring out his practi- 1
cal views on agricultural prob- :
terns. Among other things, he ’
wants to keep Soviet cowboys
off the trail and ship cattle by
rail or slaughter them close to
home. Interrupting the report
of a regional chief who sug
gested these measures, Mr.
Khrushchev said:
“I cannot understand what
difference it would make where
a cow is killed. Why is it neces
sary to drag her 500 to 1,000
kilometers? Cattle which cover
hundreds of kilometers lose
weight.”
He also erupted at local
leaders who fake agricultural'
statistics to cover up unful
filled quotas. "They must be
thrown out of the party and
brought to court,” he said.
In another interruption, he
welcomed a report that agri
cultural Institutes are being
moved out of Moscow to get
closer to the farmers they
serve. As laughter echoed in
the hall, he said: "All such in
stitutes desire to be around
the Bolshoi Theater (in Mos
cow) as if that were their
main base.”
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Senator Allott
Will Oppose
BobKeimedy
By Um Associated Preu
Senator Allott, Republican (
of Colorado, announced yester- t
day he plans to vote against (
Senate confirmation of Robert (
F. Kennedy as Attorney Gen
eral. ,
Senator Allott was the first ,
Senator from either party to (
declare an intention to oppose ]
the nomination of President- j
elect Kennedy’s brother. He (
said he believes Robert Ken- (
nedy lacks the legal experience ;
required for the job.
Without a dissenting vote
the Senate Judiciary Commit- ;
tee agreed Friday to approve |
the nomination. All of the
Kennedy cabinet choices ap- <
pear assured of Senate eon- 1
firmation, although three of
them still have not been ques
tioned by Senate committees.
Clashed During Probe
The 35-year-old Robert Ken
nedy had some clashes with
three Republican members of
the now-expired Senate Rac
kets Investigating Committee,
both beforq * nd ufter he re
signed as its chief counsel.
Two of them. Senators Gold
water of Arizona and Mundt of
South Dakota, said in separate
Interviews they will vote for
his confirmation. The third.
Senator Curtis of Nebraska,
said he has not yet made up
his mind.
Before quitting the commit
tee post last year, Mr. Ken- i
nedy said Republican members
had forced the group into what
he termed a dishonest investi
gation of Walter Reuther’s
United Auto Workers Union.
In a summary of the hearings
he described Senators Gold- <
water, Mundt and Curtis as
biased against Mr. Reuther.
Allott Airs Views
Senator Allott never served ,
on the Rackets Committee and
did not mention Mr. Kennedy’s i
blowups with its G.OP. mem
bers in his statement.
Os Robert Kennedy, Senator
Allott had this to say:
"As a lawyer, I do not feel
that a man who has never en
gaged 4n the actual practice of
law and who has never really
tried a case in court has the
experience to be the chief
legal officer of our Nation.”
Some G.O.P. Senators sug
gest privately that Mr. Ken
nedy will get a big Republican
vote for confirmation, in the
theory that anything he does
which might prove unpopular
would react against his Presi
dent-brother.
Goldwater Explains Stand
Senator Goldwater said he
doesn’t like that sort of think
ing.
“I’m going to vote for Bob
because he's the man Jack
wants in that job, and I always
believe in pretty much letting
a President have his way on
these things.” Senator Gold
water said.
"Bob Kennedy, has sense
enough to surround himself
with exeprienced and capable
men to cover up for his lack
of experience.
"I don’t hope anybody In
Government stubs his toe, be
cause when that happens the
Government is hurt.”
Foreign Relations Commit
tee Chairman Fulbright, mean
while said yesterday the com
mittee will hold a hearing
Wednesday on Adlai E. Steven
son’s designation as United
Nations Ambassador.
Senator Fulbright also ar
ranged for a public hearing
Thursday on the proposed ap
pointment of Chester Bowles
as Undersecretary of State in
the Kennedy administration.
Fund Drive to Aid
Cuban Students
BATON ROUGE, La., Jan. 14
(AP).—Emergency aid is being
mustered for Cuban students at
Louisiana State University, Dr.
Edward Grant, chairman of
LSU’s foreign student hospital
ity committee, said today.
Dr. Grant said the 45 Cuban
students at LBU were in critical
need after funds from home
were cut off by the Fidel Castro
regime. He said many other
universities may have the same
problem.
A similar situation came to
light earlier at the University
of Southwestern Louisiana at
’ Lafayette, where a student or
’ ganization is seeking 35,000 to
1 aid 17 Cuban students.
A meeting of Dr. Grant’s
I committee will be held Monday
'to consider the problem. He
said a local fund drive is
planned.
Cold War Easing Seen
During Inauguration
By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER
Associated Pre* Stall Writer
Nikita Khrushchev’s desire for a summit conference with
John F. Kennedy this year has come to be regarded here as a
frotection for world peace during the inauguration period.
It should discourage the Soviet Premier from making any
dangerous international moves that he might otherwise be
tempted to make at a time of
change in the White House
command.
From President Eisenhower .
down, officials of the outgoing
administration have been con
cerned about the dangers in
herent in the transfer of power
from one Chief Executive to
another. Presumably the same
concern has operated in the
Kennedy camp.
Members of both administra
tions have co-operated to min
imize the dangers. Full infor
mation on world crisis spots
has been given to incoming
Secretary of State Dean Rusk
and the prospective Defense
Secretary, Robert S. McNa
mara.
Mr. Rusk, Mr. McNamara
and others have held many
conferences with the men they
will succeed —though without
taking responsibility for the de
cisions that have been made
or may yet have to btf made
in the closing days of the
Elsenhower administration.
Dangerous Two Weeks
From a command point of
view the next two weeks will
be the most vulnerable for the
United States in at least eight
years and possibly much longer.
In 1953, when Mr. Eisenhower
Succeeded President Truman,
the Soviets were exercising con
siderable caution in the-cold
war. The Korean conflict,
though still under way, was
focused on negotiations for a
truce.
Today there are several
trouble spots where the Soviets
or the Chinese Communists or
a satellite with big power back
ing might be tempted to make
some quick military or diplo
matic move in the hope of se
curing a substantial Communist
gain before the United States
could make a counter move.
One of the crisis centers is
in Laos. Negotiations are under
way lor a diplomatic solution to
the civil war but the danger
persists that the Communists
may make a massive thrust into
Laos from North Viet Nam.
Other trouble spots where Mr.
Khrushchev could try a quick,
dangerous maneuver include
Cuba, the Congo and Berlin.
The most dangerous time for
the United States actually will
be the period of the inaugura
tion ceremonies next (Friday.
That will be the lost few min
utes of Mr. Eisenhower’s power
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INTERPRETIVI REPORT
to act and the first few
minutes of Mr. Kennedy’s
responsibility for decision.
No Dropping of Reins
Mr. Eisenhower has passed
the word to all necessary offi
ciate that in matters involving
United States securtiy he will
act decisively up to the final
second he Is in office.
Officials who have been in
volved in the transition report
that on the problems which
can be anticipated—Laos is an
example—Mr. Rusk and Mr.
Kennedy have been given such
complete information that
they should be able to act de
cisively If faced with a sudden
Communist challenge.
The best-informed authori
ties in the State Deputment,
however, believe that the Com
munist high command will not
risk a dangerous play now.
They think both Mr. Khru
’ shchev and the leaders of Red
I China are well enough tn
i formed on the operations of
; the United States Government
. to know that regardless of the
’ distractions of inauguration,
. provision would be made for
dealing with any emergency.
I More important, however, is
, said to be the Khrushchev
i commitment to a “peaceful co
- existence” policy. Diplomatic
experts say this does not mean
I Mr. Khrushchev will avoid all
i aggressive acts. He may use
’ threats and pressures to try to
force a summit conference at
i the same time he seeks to ar
range it through peaceful ne
gotiations.
But officials said he could
i easily overplay his hand and
make it virtually impossible by
i an excessive show of hostility
’ for Mr. Kennedy to agree to a
> summit conference for a long
time.
i
I
Short to Speak
Milton 8. Kronheim, Wash
i ington businessman, will be
honored at the Washington
• Hebrew Academy’s 17th anni
l versary dinner at 9:30 p.m. to
. day at the school, 6045 Six
. teenth street N.W. Dewey
. Short. Assisstant Secretary of
■ the Army, will be the speaker.
i
THE SUNDAY STAR
Washingtott, D. C„ January IS, 1961
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U Other suits, were $55 to 5175..N0W $43.50 to $132.50 A
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