OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 16, 1961, Image 2

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1961-01-16/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for A-2

A-2
THE EVENING STAR
WatUnftM, D. C., January 14, 19A1
if
* •• —.-« - ■ * *
Lionel Hampton, the jazz musician, kneels
in Rome to kiss the ring of Archbishop Joseph
E. Ritter of St. Louis after the archbishop
was formally notified of his elevation to the
College of Cardinals.—AP Wirephoto via radio
from Rome.
Pope Pleads for Peace,
Makes Ritter Cardinal
VATICAN CITY, Jan. 16 (AP).—Pope John XXIH today
created four new cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church and
at the same time made an impassioned plea for peace in the
world. ’ -<
Those elected to the College of Cardinals—high Senate body
of the church—were Archbishops Joseph E. Ritter of St. Louis,
Mo.; Jose Humberto Quintero
of Caracas. Venezuela; Luis
Concha Cordoba of Bogota,
Colombia, and Msgr. Giuseppe
Ferretto, an Italian member of
the Vatican Curia and the sec
retary of the Pontifical Com
mission for Latin America.
The close connection of all
four of the new cardinals with
the Americas resulted In the oc
casion being dubbed unoffi
cially “the American consis
tory.”
Pope John announced their
elevation to the college in an
allocution made in in a secret
consistory at the Vatican Pal
sce’s Consistorial Hall. Twen
ty-nine cardinals—mostly mem.
bers of the Vatican Curia
heard the Pope.
Messengers Sent
Immediately after the pro
nouncement of the names of
the;new cardinals, papal mes
sengers left the Vatican to
briqg official notification of
their elevation—the “biglietti"
—to the new cardinals.
Cardinal Ritter received his
bigMetto at the pontifical Worth
American prelates and students
of the college.
The two South American
cardinals received theirs at the
pontifical Latin-American Col
lege in Rome.
Pope John in his allocution
told the assembled cardinals
that the word peace is fre
quently abused and used to feed
rivalry and discord. But he
TODAYS WEATHER REPORT
District and vicinity Occa
sional snow ending tonight with
little additional accumulation,
low 32 in the city and 30 in
the Suburbs. Cloudy tomorrow,
high about 40.
Maryland—Occasional snow
xmlght, little additional ac
cumulation in east, but possibly
2 or 3 more inches in west with
roads. Low, 28 in west,
F 2 in east. Cloudy tomorrow,
nigh'36 to 43.
Virginia Cloudy tonight
.vith occasional snow in west
uid north portions and drizzle
n southeast. Little additional
' mow. accumulation except in
me counties near West Vir
tinia, possible 2 or 3 inches
bore with slippery roads. Low,
’8 to 33. Mostly cloudy tomor
ow, high 40 to 48.
Lower Potomac and Ches
apeake Bay—Northerly winds
t 10 knots tonight and north
zest winds at 15 knots tomor
ow. Cloudy with drizzle in
outh and wet snow In north
mding tonight. Mostly cloudy
omorrow. Visibility Improving
ate tonight, becoming 10 miles
omorrow.
• n« Sax and tka Moon
*' Rises Sets
on, today 7:25 a.m. 5:11p.m.
Jun. tomorrow 7:24 a.m. 6:12 p.m.
Moon, today.. 6:53 a.m. 5:16 p.m.
i Automobile Uahts must bo turned on
U hour alter sunset.
yjk Dtttfttm UA. WIAIHIt WUAU
7 \
—————————
■amaamw M ■■■
Until Tuesday Morning *
Figures Shew tow Temperatures txpected .
Snow is expected to end tonight in the North Atlantic States. A few
snow flurries are predicted for the Northern Rockies, and rain is fore
cast for the Northern and Central Pacific Coast. It will be colder in
the South Atlantic States and in the Ohio and Tennessee Valleys and
wanner in the Western Great Lakes area.—AP Wirephoto Map.
I
1 said that despite current situ
ations. he nourished “serene
■ Christian optimism.”
The Pope said that he hoped
and prayed that when the
"legitimate aspirations” of peo
ples for liberty and independ
-1 ence are attained, that "the
1 richest will aid the poorest,
the strongest will sustain the
weakest, and the most id
vanced will extend a hand to
the least developed, and all
finally feel themselves to be
brothers because all are sons
of the same Father who is in
Heaven.”
“We have mentioned the
word peace.” said Pope John.
“A prayerful message of peace
is what we wish to address to
the whole world on the thres
. hold of this new year.”
I The Pope said that it was a
. "matter of great regret” that
i the “unanimous and world
t wide desire of all the nations
* for peace does not succeed in
conquering the widespread fear
s and tensions which the dis
i agreements cap carry forward
> y_ t _^^? uen H g jy
s “The brief and partial breaks
in the international horizon,”
i he said, “only emphasize the
> general disappointments.”
The Pope referred briefly to
the forthcoming Ecumenical
i Council of the Roman Catholic
s Church—to be convened in
■ about a year—and said that it
1 would aim at being "a service
e rendered to truth, an act of
■I FIVE-DAY FORECAST
i For District and Vicinity
January 17 to 21
> Temperatures probably will
• average within a few degrees
of normal high of 44 and low
l of 28. Generally fair weather
• with somewhat higher daytime
r temperatures and a bit cooler
i at night.
Mail Conditions—AAA
Wui —District of Columbia to Penn
•ylronla turnpike, wet. some slippery
•pots. Pennsylvania turnpike, Bedford
• to Plttsbunb partly ■now-covered, some
slush and Icy spots. Pittsburgh to Ohio
1 line mostly wet: Ohio turnpike, clear;
, U. S. 40 west to Ohio, wet with some
■ slippery spots except In mountains
I west of Cumberland, snow-covered and
slippery; U. 8. 50 west to Ohio, wet
1 with some slippery spoU except Win
chester west; snow-covered and sllp-
• pery.
. South—U. 8. 1 to Richmond, wet;
• Shirley hlahway <Va. Rte. 3301. wet;
, Richmond south, wet; D. C. to Char
lottesville. wet. some slippery spoU.
North and East—District of Colum
bia to Delaware Memorial Bridie,
mostly wet. some slippery spots; New
■ Jersey turnpike, wet, some slippery
(spots: 35 mlle-wn-hour speed limit;
New England, snow-covered and sllp
, pery except Vermont and New Hamp
shire, clear. State police recommend
- no unnecessary travel, chains advised;
I District of Columbia to Harrisburg,
Pennsylvania; wet with some slippery
i spots to the Pennsylvania line: Penn
sylvania, snow and Ice-covered.
Precipitation
, Month 1961 1960 Norm. Roc. Yr.
’ January. 1.39 2.66 3.24 7.83 '37
> February 8.33 3.44 6.84 *B4
March.. 2.08 8.03 8.84 *9l
April... 3.15 3.06 9.13 ’B9
May... 4.35 3.98 10.69 *53
June .... 2.55 3.41 10.94 ,'OO
July ...» 4.61 4.26 11.06 *45
August.. 4.18 4.75 14.41 *2B
SepU'ber .... 4.17 4.12 17.45 *34
. October .... 2.54 2.85 8.81 *37
1 Nove'ber 0.99 2.73 7.18 *77
Doco'ber .... 3.43 2.61 7.56 *Ol
President Asks
For Increase
Os 37,000 Jobs
Government employment
would increase slightly as a re
sult of President Eisenhower's
1962 fiscal budget submitted to
Congress today.
Employment during the fiscal
year starting July 1, 1961, and
ending June 30. 1962, would
rise from 2,383,000 to 2,420.000.
This would be a gain of 37,000
jobs scattered in various de
partments and agencies.
While the new Kennedy ad
ministration is expected to re
vise the budget requests after
taking office, the Eisenhower
job estimates are not expected
to be reduced. If anything, the
Kennedy budget requests may
be for more jobs to cover pro
posed new programs.
President Eisenhower's budg
et request calls for 849 new
jobs for the National Aeronau
tics and Space Agency, 735 of
them in the Washington area.
Six hundred new jobs are
for NASA’s new Goddard
Space Flight Center at Belts
ville, while 135 are for the
agency's headquarters here.
The civilian employment of
the Defense Department, the
Government’s largest employer,
would remain the same.
The budget also calls for a
total of 1,025,000 civilian jobs
in the defense agencies by
June 30, 1962, exactly what
the total is expected to be as
of July 1, 1961.
Breaking it down by depart
ments, Army would have
384,000 civilian employes in
fiscal 1962; Air Force. 299,000,
and Navy, 340,000, all un
changed from fiscal 1961. The
Office of the Secretary of De
fense would have 1,862 em
ployes in fiscal 1962, a reduc
tion of 79 employes from its
present total of 1,941.
In his final budget message,
Mr. Elsenhower urged Congress
to take a more realistic look at
Federal salaries, particularly in
, the middle and upper brackets
' where he said inadequate
salaries were making it difficult
for the Government to attract
’ and retain key employes in
these jobs.
Mr. Eisenhower also called
for Congress to take steps to
finance adequately the civil
[ service retirement system.
! ——a———a
I
1 charity and an example of
peace solemnly proclaimed to
i all nations by this supreme see,
. which is the center of Catholic
i unity.”
1 Cites Church Troubles
Pope John also turned his at
. tention to current troubles of
' the Catholic Church in various
( parts of the world. He did not
' mention Cuba or Haiti, 'but
' some of his references were
■ obviously directed to those
I Latin-American nations.
. Noe did the Pope mention
Communism by name, but aome
i of his words were clearly aimed
* at the situation of the church
i and ita members in Communist-
ruled nations.
> The secret meeting of the
I Pope and the previous cardinals
: was the first of four consis
i tories being held this week for
: the elevation of the four pre-
* lates.
’ At a semi-public consistory
River Revert
Potomac River cloudr at Harper's
Parry and muddy at Groat Falls. Shen
andoah cloudy at Harper’s Ferry.
Teasporatares for Yeeterdax
Mldnlcht 49 Noon 39
4 a.m. 44 4 p.m. 36
8 a.m .41 8 p.m. 34
Record Temperatures tor the Tear
Hlxhost. S 3, on January 6.
Lowest, 22, on January 10.
(Furnished by the United States Cosst
and Geodetic Survey 1
Today Tomorrow
Hl«h 7:09 a.m. 8:05 a.m.
Low 1:46a.m. 2:37 a.m.
High 7:41p.m. 8:34 p.m.
Low 1:58 pun. 2:53 p.m.
For high and low Udes at the tollow-
Int points subtract tlmss indicated
from the above:
Annapolis. 3’/« hours; Bloody Point
Light. 4ti hours; Colonist Beach. 6
hours: Deale. 4‘,4 hours; Solomons
Island. 6'/i hours, and Point Lookout,
7Vs hours.
Temperatures In Vsrious Cities
H. L. H. L.
A’lene. Tex. 63 31 Key West 79 66
A'any. NY. 36 19 Knoxville 52 37
Albuqu'oue 51 25 Little Rock 47 34
Anchorase 8 2 Los Angeles 82 55
Atlanta 53 43 Loulsvtlls 43 36
Atl'tlcClty 44 31 Memphis 48 35
Baltimore 49 31 M’ml Beach 80 65
Billinas 56 44 Milwaukee 35 29
B'mlnsham 61 42 Minneapolis 26 20
Blsmsrck 46 28 Montgomery 53 46
Boise 55 24 NewO'eans 60 35
Boston 40 28 New York 32 28
Buffalo 29 24 Nortolk 50 39
Bu'ton. Vt. 16 -2 O’kls. City 52 29
Ch'ton. SC. 61 48 Omsha 30 17
Charlotte 58 43 P'ladelphla 44 30
Cheyenne SO 34 Phoenix 73 41
Chicago 35 33 Pittsburgh 41 30
Cincinnati 41 35 P'land. Me. 25 18
Cleveland 35 29 P'land. Ore. 58 45
C'mbus. O. 42 36 Ralelch 57 40
Dallas 57 33 Rspld City 54 32
Denver 52 34 Reno 56 22
Des Moines 32 26 Richmond 48 25
Detroit 43 27 St. Louis 38 34
Duluth 32 21 B Lake City 52 27
Fort Worth 57 32 San Antonio 73 38
Fresno 43 38 Savsnnsh 64 44
Houston 67 39 S. Fr’clsco 48 41
Huron-« 20 17 Besttie 54 45
Indla’polls 34 22 Tampa 71 54
J'son. Miss. 51 36 Wichita 46 42
Kansas City 35 34
THE FEDERAL SPOTLIGHT
U. S. Employe Unit
Alerts Administration
| By JOSEPH YOUNG
Star Staff Writer
The National Federation of Federal Employes has urged
1 the incoming Kennedy administration to “halt the rapidly
’ growing practice” of contracting-out long-established Govern
-1 ment work to private industry.
* The independent employe union sharply criticized the
Eisenhower administration for “persistently" following a policy
of abolishing vital functions
regularly performed by Federal
1 employes and transferring the :
j work to industry.
The NFFE expressed hope ]
that President-elect Kennedy
will reverse this trend. It
' quoted a statement made by
' Mr. Kennedy several years ago
. warning against "an overzeal-
■ ous pursuit” of the goal to
‘ withdraw the Government from
' so-called commercial enter
. prises. •
In a letter at that time to
. the House Appropriations Com-
T mittee, the-then Senator Ken
. nedy declared, “I believe it is
f wise to review the commercial
operations engaged in by the
j Federal Government and to
j withdraw from commercial
. enterprise where it can be done
> safely. • However. I would
' counsel against an overzealous
[ pursuit of this goal which
> might have highly undesirable
' results.”
The NFFE said the Eisen
t hower administration’s con
s trading out policies with their
r lucrative cost-plus contracts,
t rather than saving the tax
s payers’ money, actually were
more costly than if the work
■ were done by Government em
: ployes.
1 These policies have not only
> resulted in the loss of jobs of
* many thousands of highly
* skilled and trained civilian em-
* ployes and added costs to the
- taxpayers, but pose a serious
■ threat to the Nation’s security,
’ the NFFE asserted.
“This is a matter of grave
’ importance to the security of
? the Nation, and one in which
‘ every citizen and taxpayer has
, a direct and vital concern” the
, NFFE noted. “It is our hope
: that the incoming administra
£ tion will give the matter
, prompt and constructive atten
tion.”
I** * *
) SENATE STUDIES The
1 Senate Civil Service Committee
has asked the Senate for 865,-
f on Wednesday Pope John will
3 give the new princes their
, birettas, the square-shaped hats
: of office. The highlight will oe
a brilliant public consistory in
St. Peter's Basilica Thursday,
when the new cardinals receive
- their broad-brimmed red hats,
[ the special emblem of rank
t which normally is never worn.
t At a final secret consistory
t Thursday the Pope will present
, their cardinal rings and titles
' to churches in Rome. Arch
bishop Ritter will receive title
i to St. Alphonsus, a century
s old church recently designated
1 a titular church.
1 Elevation of the four new
* cardinals raised the member
ship of the college to a record
’ high of 85.
I
r "A nMtitr Good Taftr"...
’ lite UUwocCe
d LUNCHIONXu /
J COCKTAILS
On Capitol Hill
107 D STREET N.L
i for r«Mrvat»oni LI. 6-441E
S DINNKR PAAKIHC M W M
5 =
6 ‘
> I - —i
3 i
S
$
)
8
I
the EPICUREAN
of the Atlantic
First Class and Economy accommoda
tions available. See your Travel Agent
or call Air France: FEderal 7-8711.
-.
000 to make studies of the
Federal employe health and life
insurance programs and the
postal service. Senate approval
is considered certain.
The funds also will be used
to set up "guidelines” for
identifying career civil service
jobs in Government and those
which should be filled with
out regard to civil service. The
committee intends to publish
a complete list of non-civil
service jobs for use by the
Kennedy administration.
Although there have been
unofficial lists published re
cently, a full roster of all non
civil service jobs has not been
compiled.
Regarding health insurance,
the Senate group wants to study
the inequities in the program
about which employes have
complained and to initiate ac
tion on what improvements it
feels are justified. The same
holds true for the life insurance
program.
BlLLS—Recent bills intro
duced in Congress would: add
three additional longevity pay
step increases, (HR-1275),
Representative Zelenko, Demo
crat of New York; provide pay
step increases for employes
above grade 15, (HR-1048),
Multer, Democrat of New York;
liberalize Government employe
longevity pay steps (HR-1004),
Representative Lesinski, Dem
ocrat of Michigan.
•• • •
CSC HONORS The Civil
Service Commission has pre
sented its highest honor—the
r
MTZ-BRENNEH
HAVf RECOUNTS*
‘Washington's Lowest Pric.sW
I RECORDER TAPE
RECOUNT PRICfS'
"FINE-QUALITY TAPE"
I 225' Acetate j|Qc 1
|3"REEL |
I 1200' Acetate $4 .19 |
■ 7" REEL I |
I 1200' PRO-Lines 4 ,79 ■
I 7" REEL I ■
I 1800* Acetate $4 ,49 I
I7" REEL I J
| 1800' Dupont $4 ,79 I
■ Maylar7“REEL I j
I 1800' PRO-LinesB>.79 ■
I 7" REEL L |
KODAK FILTERS
R.g. 89c fach
I SERIES IV, V, VI, 3<«> f 1’ M ■
RED-GREJN-YELLOW
Overnight Developing |
& Printing Services ■
I LEAVE BY 3:30 P.M.
READY NEXT A.M.
BLACK & WHITE
Kodacolor—Kodachrome
I
Commissioners’ Award for Dis
tinguished Service—to its three
top officials in the Government
employe health insurance pro
gram for their work in develop
ing the program and getting
it off the ground. Those honor
ed were Andrew Ruddock, di
rector of the CSC bureau of
retirement and insurance;
David Lawton, deputy director;
and Solomon Papperman, spe
cial assistant to the director
and head of the health bene
fits task force.
The awards are very well de
served. Developing the complex
Federal employe health insur
ance program, which is a major
business in itself and one in
which the Government had no
previous experience, was a ma
jor achievement for which
these three top officials and all
the members of their staff
deserve great credit.
The CSC gave special cita
tions for top service to Donald
Harvey, chief of its examining
division; Miss P. Huntley. Hof
fman of the Bureau of Inspec
tions and Classification Audits;
Robert Milkey, program plan
ning division; and Raymond
Jacobson of the standards di
vision.
•• • •
CAPITAL ROUNDUP—“Ex
ecutive Development—Fact or
, Fable?” will be discussed at the
dinner meeting of the Society
’ for Personnel Administration
at 6 p.m. tomorrow in the In
ternational Room of the Oc
cidental Hotel. The speakers
are Robert Blake, professor of
psychology at the University
of Texas, and James Enneis,
’ director of psychodrama, St.
I Elizabeths Hospital. . . .“The
' Presidential Transition—Pre-
• Ingaugural Phase” will be dis-
• cussed at a luncheon of the
' Ameirean Society for Public
• Administration, Washington
. Chapter, at 12:30 pin. Wednes
day in the International Room,
! Occidental Restaurant. The
• speakers are Deputy Budget
■ Director Elmer Staats and John
Corson, director of McKinsey
and Co. . . . Treasury’s Bureau
[ of the Debt has given the fol-
lowing awards: outstanding
’ performance ratings, Irwin
OPENS FE8.20
MAIL ORDERS NOW
tea
B F'
P wii
* fl
» Ku J a-- '
Egg* 'JROB
'gaQXjfcOiKtl ■
■ WB
OTO PREMINGER PRESENTS
PAUL NEWMAN EVA MARIE SAINT
RALPH RICHARDSON PETER LAWORD
LEE J.COBB SALMINEO JOHN DEREK
HUGH GRIFFITH GREGORY RAToFF
JILL HAWORTH IN "EXODUS”
SUPER PANAVISION 70• TECHNICOLOR®-TODD AO STEREOPHONIC SOUND
UPTOWN Theatre
3426 Conn. Avt. Washington 8, D. C. WO. 6-5400
FIRST EXCLUSIVE ENBAGEMEMT BEGINS FEBRUARY 20, 1961 at S R.m.
EVENINGS (Mon. thru Thurs.) .. 8 P.M. orch.B2.so Logo »a.»o Bale. «l.ao
EVENINGS (Fri. Sat. Holz.) 8 P.M. Oreh. 82.78 Logo 82.78 Bale. 82.00
EVENINGS (Sun.)7:3o P.M. Orch. 82.78 Logo 82.78 Bale. 82.0a
MATINEES (Wed.) 2 P.M. Orch. 82.0a Logo 82.00 Bale. 81.48
MATINEES (Sat. Sun. Hola.) ... . 2 P.M. Orch. 82.18 Logo 82.10 Bale, li.io
NAME
ADDRESS
NO. OF SEATSAT t MAT. EVE.
DATE REQUESTEDALTERNATE DATES
*l'3” YOU ’ CHECI< °* MONEY OkOER 9AYAM.I
TO THE UFTOWN THIATkE 3426 CONN. AVE. N.W., WASHINGTON, D. C. All SEATS
(ESHVEO—AII FEICES ARE TAX INCLUDED.
For Theatre Party Information, Call WO. 6-7832
Armstrong, Marjorie Arm
strong, Rosalyne Austin. Violet
Baker, Eugene Callaghan, Eve
lyn Caul, Eugenia Ciampa,
Elsie Cocker, Delarea Coley,
Laura Creamer, Clair Furr,
Eleanor Gladmon, James Grif
fin, Hazel Harris, Arzela Hyder,
Maudena Jackson, Evelyn John
son, Grace Kellaway, Alice
Maggio, Joseph Marceron, Mary
»
Ii < a
'BICB a-/>•• Be
W Call your travel agent or TWA ST 3-4200 1
MSTCST
I TWA j
THE SUPERSET A!RUNE*
■nss THt WTtMT SMLMI « a MOK. » wmM -Mm h T,«u W«M SMMS. ■■.
Moore, Alice K. Smith. Hazel
Osborne, Margaret Paulson
Harvey Roenicke. Huth Rysin
ski, Ruth H. Smith, Cecelia
Stansfield, Irene Townsend,
Ruth Turner, Juanita Walker,
Surilla Walker, Ruth Yates;
superior performance, Rae
Pushkin, Carlyn Loyd, Betty
Gilbert, Cora Mcßride and
George Frenzee.

xml | txt