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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 21, 1961, Image 13

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KERRY DRAKE —By Alfred Andriolo
WE'RE SCHOOLING A f KND, SERGEANT.' LOOK A DUDE CRAVATTE ) AFTER ALL THE YEARS
-« CLASS OF NEW DETECTIVES, \ THESE BOVS OVER'.. IF ) IS RESIGNING < WE'VE WORKED TOGETHER?
I JUST PUT KAYA MYER ) SGT. DRAKE' YOU'RE DOWN / ONE STANDS OUT, YOU \ FROM THE DE- ).. HE CAN'T DO THAT' WHERE
AND HER FRIENDS ON A <( FOR A LECTURE ON COLLEC- ( MAY HAVE HIM AS YOUR J » PARTMENT' 7 IS HE? I'VE GOT TO TALK
PLANE FOR HOME, CHIEF' TION OF EVIDENCE' A X NEW FARTHER/ ft-—, .
..SO I'M READY FOR I] I \-y NEW < ft Y 1
NEW ASSIGNMENT.' X I PARTNER, ) ■ V’
I SIR?.' J I I -
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JULIET JONES 5 —By Stan Drake
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BUZ SAWYER —By Roy Crane
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DAVID CRANE —By Creig Flessel
THIS IS ONE OF THE ft MEANWHILE-) t I'M GLAD TO SEE YOU. Mg RECXETT "
ROADSIDE CHAPELS, J ■, f (*&? ‘ R3|MRk WE REALLy DO N EED HELP WITH
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UNCLE CHARLIE. _ By p„ er Loi
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VAMPIRE I r . . l ?!
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WORDS, WIT AND WISDOM
By WILLIAM MORRIS
Today’s quiz asks you to pick
adjectives similar In meaning
to each other. For each word
in the numbered list below
there is a word of nearly or
precisely the same meaning in
the lettered list. If the word
FUEL OIL
AND
BURNER
SERVICE
Radio Controlled Trucks
E. C. KEYS & SON
JUniper 9-1771
.ESTABLISHED IN 1889
: I lettered "A” means nearly the
: same as the word numbered 5,
I write this down as 5-A. When
you are finished, check against
■ the answers at the end of the
i column.
Note: Score 10 points for
each correct answer; 100 points
is an excellent score; 80 is
good. Sixty or below means
that you had better check
each word in your dictionary;
then try using them in your
dally speech.
1. Prtvoloui A. Bitter
2. 111-omened B. Invulnerable
?• 2? d i°u» C. Monetary
4 Stentorian D. Prior
§• Pecuniary E. Distinguished
g. Piddling F. Wearisome
• . Antecedent G. Capricious
R. Virulent H. Trifling
0. Illuatrious I. Clamorous
10. Impregnable J. Inauspicious
Answers: I—G; 2—J; 3—F;
4—l; 5—C; 6—H; 7—D; B—A;
9—E; 10—B.
Like to play word games?
1909 Gamecocks
Sneered at Roundball
COLUMBIA, S. C. (AP).
Basketball, a major sport that
interests millions throughout
■ the Nation, had minor status
years ago.
For example, the 1909 edition
• of “Garnet and Black,” the
i University of South Carolina
, annual, listed the game as
i “Sissy Ball.”
Only three games were on the
USC schedule that year, and
all three were lost.
William Morris has chosen 10
of his trickiest word games and
puzzles for the family, party
or solitaire play. For your copy
of the pamphlet, simply send a
self-addressed stamped enve
lope plus 10 cents for handling
to William Morris, “Top Ten
Word Games,” in care of The
Star.
Virginia Riflemen
Elect New Officers
FREDERICKSBURG, Va.,
Jan. 21 (AP).—John W. Court
ney, Jr., of West Point has been
elected president of the Vir
ginia States Rifle and Revolver
Association.
Courtney, a former president
and secretary-treasurer of the
association, succeeds Max B.
Hodges jr„ of Arlington.
Others elected at the annual
meeting were, Lewis White
house, Hampton, vice presi
dent; Miss Alice Courtney,
West Point, secretary-treas
urer; Dr. Richard ' Russell,
Newport News, vice president
on junior activities, and C. S.
Maltby, Arlington, vice presi
dent for tournament activities.
The association approved
sponsorship of a civilian high
powered rifle team in matches
this year at Camp Perry, Ohio,
and adopted a schedule of State
matches for the year. It dis-
Study of Fishing,
Hunting to Start
Interviewing in the second
national hunting and fishing
survey will begin late this
month, the Interior Depart
ment has announced.
The survey will cover hunt
ing and fishing activity during
the calendar year 1960. It will
be the first such survey taken
since 1955, when a study was
made at the request of the
International Association of
Game, Fish and conservation
Commissioners. This Associa
tion also requested the new
study.
It is planned to interview
about 8,000 persons during a
three-week period. Complete
results are expected to be
announced early in the autumn,
probably in September, though
data on the size of the hunting
and fishing population may be
available later this spring.
The work will be done by
the Census Bureau, but will
be financed by the Bureau of
Sport Fisheries and Wildlife
with funds collected under the
Federal aid in fish and wild
life restoration acts.
cussed ways to promote ac
ceptance of mixed rifle teams
for boys and girls at Virginia
high schools.
THE EVENING STAR
Washington, D. C v Saturday, January 21, 1961
SOME HAVE LIMITATIONS
Buying Boat Radio?
Consider Carefully
By CHARLES COVELL
Outdoor Xdltor
So you’ve decided, for safety’s sake, to buy radio
equipment for your boat this spring. Will it be stand
ard radiotelephone or one of the new citizens’ band
sets?
The latter have become very popular and- license
applications are pouring into the Federal Communi-
cations Commission at a rate
of 10,000 to 12,000 a month.
But citizens’ band radios have
definite limitations and since
there seems to be some con
fusion on the subject, it. would
be well to make a careful com
parison before you buy.
First'off, the marine radio
telephone or shlp-to-shore is
exclusively a waterborne in
strument, mentioned by the
Coast Guard for distress calls
and also by fellow boatmen
who are required to keep their
sets tuned to the distress fre
quency when they are not ac
tually using othfer channels.
In addition, you can talk with
another vessel or call a phone
operator to be connected with
any telephone ashore.
Can’t Call Coast Guard
On a citizens* band radio
you can only caU another per
son similarly equipped on shore
or in another boat. You cannot
call the Coast Guard for help
nor does the Coast Guard mon
itor the calls. Neither can you
put through a telephone call
ashore.
’Another consideration is
range, Important on big waters.
The citizens’ band is ths old
11-meter band once used by
amateur radio operators. It was
subdivided into 23 channels
and of these 22 were released
for general use by the FCC in
1959.
A licensee may use any of
these channels but an FCC re
quirement limiting these sets to
five watts of input power con
fines communications to local
areas and prevents the airways
from becoming cluttered.
Since the citizens’ band ra
dio uses a “line-of-slght” fre
quency that extends only to the
horizon it cannot compete with
the radiotelephone which can
send its signals far beyond the
horizon.
Range One to 25 Miles
Normally, the range of a
citizens' band radio varies be
tween one and 25 miles depend
ing on antenna efficiency and
atmospheric conditions. Some
times the high frequency
bounces signals off the iones
phere so that conversations can
be heard in far-distant places,
but this is a rarity.
As a rule of thumb, a radio
telephone has a range about one
and a half times its input power
so that a 40-watt set could be
expected to send a signal 60
miles. This also depends, of
course, on how crowded the
airways may be in that par
ticular locality and on atmos
pheric conditions.
Power is one of the Indexes
to price, so naturally citizens’
band radios are much cheaper.
HUNTING AND FISHING
Virginia's Deer Harvest
Tribute to Management
Virginia’s record harvest of
18,225 white-tailed deer despite
poor hunting conditions west
of the Blue Ridge last season
is a tribute to Intelligent game
management.
The deer were harvested by
some 100,000 hunters in 29
counties which had a six-day
open season. The kill exceeded
by 16 per cent the 1959 take of
15,745 deer in that area and
was a 700 per cent Increase in
the harvest of 2,255 only 10
years ago.
Does accounted for three
fourths of the 16 per cent
boost. While does made up 39
per cent of the 1959 kill, their
ratio last November rose to 43
out of 100.
All but 224 of the 18,225 deer
were taken in counties having
identical seasons: three days in
which either a buck or doe
might be taken and three days
of "bucks only.”
Conditions were poor because
of a long spell of dry weather,
making the leaves too noisy for
stalking. Hunters also com
plained that temperatures were
too high.
Shenandoah led all other
counties with 2,534 deer har
vested. The others:
Augusta, 2,212; Bath, 2,162;
Rockingham, 1,371; Smyth,
1,246; Craig, 967; Frederick,
952; Grayson, 891; Highland,
658; Alleghany. 607; Giles, 602;
Botetourt. 537; Warren, 535;
Rockbridge, 534; Page, 521;
Wythe, 440; Scott, 424; Wise,
324; Washington, 286; Clarke,
99; Bland, 72; Lee, 66; Taze
well, 60; Pulaski, 42; Dicken
son, 24; Floyd, 18; Roanoke,
17; Russell, 14, and Carroll, 10.
Virginia’s total deer kill will
not be known until reports are
in from east of the Blue Ridge
where the season extended until
January 5.
•• • •
Maryland hunters, too, had
a record deer season, although
the kill never approaches Vir
ginia’s. The Game and Inland
Fish Commission says the har
vest was 6,182 deer weighing
681,950 pounds.
Biggest kill prior to last sea
son was in 1958 when 4,596
deer were bagged.
Hunters killed 4,109 deer dur
ing the December firearms sea
son, another 818 during a spe
cial doe season in six Eastern
Shore counties and 174 by bow
and arrow.
They now far outnumber radlo
! telephones. The FCC said this
week that licenses total 166,930
although only a small percent
age of these sets are in boats.
Many are used by taxicab fleets
and others needing two-way
communication.
Can Be Big Help
Although you can’t call .the
1 Coast Guard, they can be a big
1 helpdn an emergency. In many
’ areas members of a boat club
agree to use one of the 22
channels and keep a check on
each other’s welfare over this
channel. Manufacturers are
1 recommending channels 9 and
13 for marine use and most
buyers are equipping their sets
with crystals for at least these
channels.
1 How about licensing? No op
- erator’s license Is required for
s the citizens’ band radio as it
< is for a radiotelephone. Only
1 the set must be licensed apd
• to obtain one you fill out Form
i 505 and mail it to the Federal
I Communications Commission,
Washington 25.
i So many applications are
. being received that there is a
I waiting time of 45 days. There
r fore, the FCC advises all those
s planning to install Citizens’
s Band radios to apply for their
I licenses at once regardless of
i whether or not they now own
the equipment.
f Need Two Licenses
For the radiotelephone you
> must get both station and
. operator's licenses. The station
I license mu?t be posted near the
, set and usually is valid for four
years from date of issuance.
It cannot be transferred, so
’ that if you sell the boat you
’ must notify the FCC at once
’ so you won’t be held liable for
the station’s future operation.
, The transmitter may be
operated only by a licensed
operator. Someone else may
converse but the licensed oper
ator must make the initial call
1 and sign off. A so-called re
stricted radiotelephone oper
' ator permit, good for life, usu
-1 ally is issued for use on volun-
• tartly equipped small boats.
' There is no fee nor examlna
’ tion.
1 In this area you merely fill
• out Form 753 and present it
along with your application for
■ a station license on Form 501
s at the FCC field office, 718
• Jackson place N.W., where you
) will be given a six-month in-
I terim license to serve until the
I station license is processed.
i The station license also is
• free but there is one require
ment. You must send 82.50 to
the Government Printing Office
i for a copy of the FCC rules
' governing • use of your radio
. telephone.
Aberdeen Proving Ground
had 841 kills. Army Chemical
Center, 183, and Woodmont Rod j
and Gun Club, 57. Garrett led ]
the counties with 871. Others
were:
Allegany, 7 91; Dorchester,
548; Worcester, 503; Kent, 450;
Washington, 4 16; Frederick,
253; Charles, 122; Harford, 106;
Cecil, 212; Talbot, 139; Wi
comico, 179, and Somerset, 168.
** • •
The inauguration spirit has
reached the sportsmen’s clubs.
| Fairfax Rod and Gun is having
an Inaugural Ball at its club
house near Manassas at 9:30
o'clock tonight to inaugurate
jits own officers. Tiny Meek
ers’ Orchestra will furnish the
music.
Alexandria Chapter of the
Izaak Walton League will in-1
stall officers at its annual
dinner tonight at the George
Mason Hotel. Guest speaker
will be Ed Douglas, assistant
chief of fish hatcheries for
Fish and Wildlife.
A dance will follow with
music by Joe McGuire’s Or
chestra. Officers to be installed
are:
Wade Hamrick, president;
Avis Wickline and John Camp
bell, vice presidents; Ernest J.
Foldi, secretary, and Charles
Richardson, treasurer.
♦» * *
Rockville Chapter of thd
Izaak Walton League recently'
named Paul Hubanks, president:!
Frank Dement, first vice presi
dent; Kenneth Hamilton, sec
ond vice president; Datus Prop
er, recording secretary; Robert!
OPEN SEASON ,
J IJEftRT
rV* cj\i
J A iWk
jo f
tz r,—Hr
'ls there room for a covey of mountain quail?'
Leisure Sports
FORE
and
AFT
— w
William B. Matthews, jr„jK?
rector of the boating diviskah
in Maryland’s Department dt
Tidewater Fisheries, lists 47Mr
boats registered in the Stgtq.
as of December 81.
Os the total. 15,161 were in
boards; 32,393, outboards, and
219, sailboats. The propulsion
of 212 was unknown.
Commenting on the fact
that 82.5 per cent, or 39,531,
were less than 26 feet long,
Matthews says it shows yacht
ing is no longer a “rich man’a
hobby.”
Baltimore County led the
list with 6,276 boats registered,'
Anne Arundel was next with,
5.953, and Baltimore City third:
with 4,752. District residents
‘registered 1,628 boats in Mary
i land as did 1,094 Virginians.
Maryland requires that mo
torboats of more than
i horsepower and sailboats 25
i feet or more long be registered
if used In the State’s watiehl
more than three months in a
year,
Matthews urges that all per
sons selling or transferring
their boats report the sale to
> the Department of Tidewater
; Fisheries. “Since July 1,” hd
• said, “we have a record of j
I little more than 800 boat!
! transferred from one owner t{
I another. However, we know
, there are a number of persons
' who have sold their boats who
k have not reported it to us.”
j•• * «
. The Potomac Valley Boating
■ Club, which was organized only
• 10 months ago by Dr. Reginald
r Mitchell, Rockville pediatrician,
f Ind J. Harry Lewis of Silver
i Spring, has grown rapidly.
Originqjly it had 31 member/
and now has 61.
i At a recent meeting Lewis
I was named commodore to suc
i ceed Dr. Mitchell. Other of-
> fleers are Donald Criswell, vice
• commodore; Lillian Simmons,
. secretary, and Richard Mar-*
i shall, cruisemaster.
i In addition to the usual boat
ing activities, plans for the
'■ coming season include cruises
for underprivileged children,
, promotion of safety afloat and
i continued efforts to develop
, better boating facilities in this
. area.
I Although the club is prim
arily for outboarders, all boat
men are Invited to attend the.
meetings held the third Mon-i
i day of each month at 8:30 p.m.r
in the auditorium of the First
; Federal Savings and Loan As
' sociatlon, 8216 Wisconsin ave
! nue, Bethesda.
t
r
, South Carolina Angler
’ Gets Double in Bass
! LANCASTER, S. C. (AP).—
Ed Moore, Lancaster florist,
s scored an angler’s double play.
Moore was casting for bass
■ in the Lansford Shoals of the ,
s Catawba River when a four-
i pounder and a three-pounder
struck his lure at the same
time.
' Montgomery, treasurer, and
Kenneth Pullen, corresponding
secretary.
Directors will be William E.
Doyle, Eugene Powers. Elmer
Jones and Lyle Hollenbeck.
Silver Spring Chapter of the
i Izaak Walton League installed
James Argerle as president at
a dinner-dance which drew
' more than 200 Waltonians and
| their guests to the new Rock
ville Civic Center.
The new president an
nounced the granting of twe
scholarships to teachers
' rolling at Maryland University
in the course, "Teaching Con*
nervation of Natural Resources."
Meetings are held the sec
ond and fourth Wednesday
nights of each month at the.
clubhouse and grounds on
Briggs-Chaney road.
♦♦ * *
Virginia’s planned release of
15,000 brown trout in its
waters next month and again
in 1962 and 1963 is purely an
experiment.
The Game Commission wants
, to determine whether the brown
[ trout can provide worthwhile
i fishing for the State's anglers.
The trout will come from
, the Fish and Wildlife hatchery
at White Sulphur Springs. W.
Va. Virginia will raise no trout
at its own hatcheries nor stock
them on a put-and-take basis.
The aim is to provide spawn
ing native populations in suit
jable waters. COVELL.
Blue Chip Winners
BALTIMORE (AP). —The
two highest-priced thorough
breds in history were winners
of the Preakness. Nashua
brought $1,251,200 in 1955 while
Bally Ache was sold for $l,-
250,000 a week before his 1960
! Preakness victory.
A-13

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