OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, February 04, 1962, Image 105

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1962-02-04/ed-1/seq-105/

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A • F I rx I ■ • I By JOHN W. STEPP
Americas Great Potential ™
For typical “outstanding” examples one need look
no farther abroad than the Washington area.
Mrs. William Bailie, mother of an 18-month-old
son, is a space scientist in the Theoretical Division of
Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt. A vibrant
26, Ann Bailie helped discover, through mathematical
computations, that the earth is slightly pear-shaped
rather than round or elliptical, due to the fact that the
effect of gravity differs in the northern and southern
hemispheres. The conclusion was reached after ex
haustive studies of the orbit of Vanguard I satellite.
How did she ever come to enter the space field?
“In college, I liked math and it came easy,” Mrs. Bailie
explains. “Besides, it’s a good, well-paying profession.”
Dr. Nancy G. Roman became interested in astrono
my at age 12, “and never outgrew it.” She is now chief
of the astronomy and astrophysics programs of the.
Office of Space Flight Programs, which, like the God
dard Center, is a branch of the National Aeronautics
and Space Administration.
Her responsibilities include planning and institu
ting comprehensive programs for examining the stars,
planets and other phenomena of space from vantage
points beyond the earth’s atmosphere by means of rock
ets, satellites and space probes. One of the programs
now being developed is the Orbiting Astronomical
Observatories Project, by which an earth-orbiting satel
lite will take electronic notes and relay them back
home.
To relax from her brain-cracking chores, Dr. Roman
enjoys cooking, making her own clothes, needlework,
club and church activities and reading anything but
science Action.
Women of similar stature can be found scattered all
over the Nation-and not all are gazing into space.
Dr. Katharine B. Blodgett, a leading American ex
pert on the chemistry of surfaces, started her scientific
career at 18. Among her achievements have been the
invention of “invisible” non-reflecting glass, a smoke
screen said to have saved several thousand lives in
World War II invasions, and a de-icing system for air
plane wings. She is with the General Electric Research
Laboratory.
Dr. Rita Levi-Montalcini of Washington University,
St. Louis, followed three scientific specialties before
settling for zoology. As it happens, her first pursuits,
neurology and psychiatry, aid her research on the nerv
ous systems of animals which may offer clinical appli
cations in the treatment of hypertension.
Continued on page 6
DR. DOROTHY HOOD
Protecting the public with toxicology
MF
DR. JOANNE STARR MALKUS
She advanced knowledge of storms
J|
DR. GRACE M. HOPPER
She puts electronic monsters to work
1 fl
DR. ELEANORA BLISS KNOPF
Mining firms are grateful to her
SUNDAY. THX STAR MAGAZINE. WASHINGTON. D. C. FEBRUARY 4. IM2
BO
DR. ELSIE QUARTERMAIN
Ecological study as a boon to industry
' iilr-AW
DR. CHIEN SHIUNG WU
A leader in experimental physics
MRS. RITA C. SAGALYN
Physics applied to the atmosphere
5

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