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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, February 04, 1962, Image 33

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BOOKS IN REVIEW
A Prodigal Rake
Happily Recaptured
By DAT THORPE
Star Book Critic
THE PRODIGAL RAKE: the Memoirs of William Hickey.
Edited by Peter Quennell. (E. p. Dutton & Co.; $6.50.)
When William Hickey died in 1830 at the age of 81 he
left a large, vellumbound manuscript book of 742 pages con
taining the memoirs of his life up to 1810. The book passed
from hand to hand until 1913, when publication of the auto
biography was commenced and completed a few years later in
four volumes. The work made no great impression upon either
the public or men of letters; possibly the time was out of
joint, possibly the expurgations in the story of an extrovert
rake robbed the writing of its
appeal. Now Peter Quennell,
who has spent many of the
happiest moments of his cre
ative life in 18th century
England, has re-edited the
book in a greatly shortened
form (but still the text is
nearly a quarter - million
words) and the result may
well be a permanent addition
to the very best of the litera
ture of the period.
William Hickey was the
son of a well-to-do lawyer.
Handsome, energetic, and
virile, he at an early age fell
into a life of debauchery as
easily and as gracefully as
a talented contemporary
might have become a mem
ber of the House of Lords, a
clergyman in the Church of
England, or an officer in the
English army. Women and
wine (but not strong drink)
were the warp and woof of
his existence, and upon oc
casion he was not averse
to theft, even of securities
of his own father’s firm, but
he points out that he never
knew the vice of gaming, ex
cept in the form of tennis
and billiards. Once, indeed,
he cleverly ascertained which
of his companions of a heavy
drinking bout had robbed his
pockets when he was in a
stupor by asking what he
had been doing before he
passed out. Upon being told
that he was gambling with
cards, he suspected his
friend of lying and of pock
et-picking—both correct as
sumptions.
Despairing of making a
conventionally respect
able man of his son, Hickey’s
father sent the 20-year-old
boy to India to become an
officer in the East India
Company’s armed forces. The
trip produced many adven
tures but no vocation, and
soon Hickey was back in Eng
land and devoted to the spor
tive life. Eventually he did
settle in Calcutta where, by
the time he retired in Buck
inghamshire in 1808. He had
made for himself a consider
able fortune in the practice
of law.
** ♦ »
Mr. Quennell arbitrarily
limits the present volume to
Hickey’s early years, break
ing off the narrative in 1783,
when the picaresque hero
was 34. Hickey’s numberless
women were from two classes
—the courtesan, the profes
sional beauty, often talented,
refined * and stimulating,
and the common whore, loud,
vulgar and dirty, whom we
recognize from her portraits
by Hogarth, Fielding and
Smollett. That he often pre
ferred the latter to the for
mer Hickey himself notes
with a touch of amazement,
and only once in his entire
life does the reader find him
interested in a respectable
girl. His great and lasting
love was Charlotte, a courte
san he offered to marry, but
who refused, although she ac
cepted the name of “Mrs.
Hickey.” She did not want to
be a burden to him if he
should cease to love her, but
« *
A 3-Volume Compilation
Os Anthony Powell's Novels
A DANCE TO THE MUSIC
OF TIME. By Anthony
Powell. (Little, Brown &
Co.; $5.95.)
Since 1951, the English
novelist Anthony Powell has
been engaged on a many
volume work entitled “The
Music of Time.” Os the
11 or 12 novels his pub
lishers intimate will make
up the complete story, five
have already appeared, and
the first three of these—“A
Question of Upbringing,”
“A Buyer’s Market,” and
“The Acceptance World”—
have just been reprinted
under one cover as “A Dance
to the Music of Time.” Let
us begin at the beginning
and see what there is in “A
Question of Upbringing,” if
anything, that makes many
readers call the work-in
progress a highly important
work, and compare it to
Proust.
Evelyn Waugh, for ex
ample, says: “It is more
realistic than ’A la Re
cherche du Temps Perdu’
and much funnier.” This
judgment strikes one as a bit
odd, since “A la Recherche,”
while it has passages of
humor and even hilarity, is
not a funny book at all. Can
you assever that champagne
sparkles even more than
cognac? As for being realis
tic, I find Mr. Powell’s people
and situations as brittle and
contrived as the conceits of
any Elizabethan humorist;
if you want realism, turn
elsewhere, but if you like
satire, wit, and neatly
turned, highly polished arti
fice, this book should be for
you a delight.
It is four reflections from
the early life of the narrator
and three of his friends—
in a public school like Eton,
in a college like one at Ox
ford, at the home of one of
the boys, and at a French
household that receives pay
ing guests. There is Jenkins,
the narrator, observant and
intelligent, who basks in the
their mutual devotion lasted
the year of life that remained
to her. Her death in 1783, as
Mr. Quennell observes, cut
short Hickey’s youth.
The life of Hickey as a
rake is duplicated in many
of its characteristics in the
Auden - Kailman - Stravinsky
“The Rake’s Progress.” The
brothels, the drink, and es
pecially the "roaring boys.”
those packs of lecherous gal
lants intent on the delights
of Venus but insisting that as
hors d’oeuvre there be a
villainous brawl among them
selves—all are painted in
bright colors in the pages of
the memoirs of an exem
plary devotee. Hickey differs
from Tom Rakewell and
from the entire modern age
in that he is a complete ex
trovert. untroubled by the
inner self, the outer cause,
the ego. guilt, or any other
manifestations of the psyche.
When Hickey woke up sick,
dirty and robbed after a
night of debauchery, he
would vomit out of the win
dow of his coach “to the en
tertainment of the passers
by.” and know that he had
been bad because his con
science told him so. The
voice of conscience was for
Hickey as unerring, and as
matter-of-fact, as it is for a
child or fundamentalist.
** * *
Hickey’s memory is abso
lutely fantastic, if there is no
trace of hoax in the book,
and if, as the memoirist says,
all his memoranda were de
stroyed by a hurricane. The
details of a dinner, or of the
ships in a harbour with the
names of their masters are
given after thirty years with
a precision that Mr. Quen
nell finds vindicated by the
few confirming cross-refer
ences he has traced. The lit
erary style of the memoirs is
excellent, and reminds the
reader of Smollett at his best.
The narrative is brisk, clear,
and entertaining: the person
alities are drawn with sharp
definition and distinction;
the dialogue is fetching.
Hickey’s vocabulary is large
and contains some forgotten
words unnoticed by even the
Oxford English Dictionary.
Some should be revived—for
example “parolly”, meaning
"orally”, as "in writing and
also parolly.”
English reviewers of the
memoirs have almost uni
versally compared Hickey
favorably with Boswell. I feel
that such praise is too much.
Hickey was perhaps as good
a writer as Boswell, but he
was not quite so interesting
a man, and his circle of
friends is today less memor
able. Nevertheless the book
is a rediscovered masterpiece.
It is to be regretted that Mr.
Quennell did not trouble to
provide footnotes on the
many people and places
mentioned in it, for Hickey’s
life could use, on almost
every page, the elucidations
and background comments
of an eighteenth century
specialist.
* *
aura of his inimitable room
mates, but in the end turns
rather uncomfortably but
surely to his crass and scape
grace uncle, who is worried
about his share of the family
inheritance. There is Wid
merpool, a misfit, very seri
ous, rubbing his gritty
knuckles, wearing the wrong
overcoat, who shocks every
body by arbitrating success
fully between a Swede and a
Norwegian who hate each
other because one mixed up
a slow lob in his fast tennis
serves. Watch out for Wid
merpool he’ll improve.
Stringham makes his mark
by setting the police on a
rather unlovely teacher by
contriving a case of mistaken
identity. Finally there is
Templer, who refuses to buy
a patent machine to turn
shirt-collars at home.
Mr. Powell’s wit is quiet
but always deadly, the inci
dents of his story are as
wildly improbable as artistry
can tolerate, and his types
can be called unique. Wheth
er his first volume is the
comer of a vast canvas or
whether it is his whole world
in miniature, only the rest
of his story will tell. I, for
one, will read it without de
lay. That Anthony Powell is
a contemporary Proust is
hard to say; certainly he is
no Mazo de la Roche.
Behind the Throne
RIZPAH. By Charles E.
Israel. (Simon <fc Schus
ter: $5.95.)
Saul’s concubine of brief
reference in the Old Testa
ment becomes a power be
hind the throne in this
scholarly book. The bloody,
frustrating struggles of Ab
ner's men seeking to secure
the nation are vividly de
scribed. So are the devious
ways by which David moves
to power and kingship.
—H. A. LYON.
■■ DU«-
WILLIAM HICKEY
Bombs Can't
Be Checked
By Ridicule
THE RULE OF FOLLY. By
James R. Newman. (Simon
& Schuster: sl, paper.)
This is a book of angry
criticism directed against
nuclear and civil defense
policies and written by the
Washington science writer
James R. Newman.
Mr. Newman shares the
universal dislike of nuclear
war, but he has an unusual
facility for putting his
thoughts into sharp. Swiftian
satire. This collection of
articles, book reviews and
public letters marks him as
an effective spokesman for
many who are at war with
the nuclear age.
His new book raises some
disturbing questions in the
mind of a careful reader
however.
First, is satire, which needs
exaggeration and humor to
be effective, the proper
weapon in this grim struggle
for nuclear sanity—a strug
gle that holds the lives of
many millions of us at stake?
The danger here is particu
larly evident when Mr. New
man distorts the statements
of his favorite targets—men
like Secretary of Defense
McNamara and writer Her
man Kahn who are trying
to make nuclear wax less
likely and less deadly—in an
effort, apparently, to score
a clever point.
Second, one wonders—
seriously—what Mr. Newman
would have us do with the
nuclear age which his scien
tists have thrust upon us.
He presents no program. Is
he for unilateral disarma
ment? If not, how does our
country deter war or defend
itself while striving for a
reasonably safe disarmament
agreement?
Mr. Newman’s book is
vastly readable, but one
doubts if even Mr. Newman
can roll back the nuclear age
with ridicule.
—RICHARD FRYKLUND.
TO BE REVIEWED
The following books will bo re
viewed on the editorial page of
The Star this week:
Monday "Francis Parkman,"
by Howard Doughty. (Macmillan.)
Wednesday—" The Taproot of
Soviet Society," by Nicholas
Vakor. (Harper.)
Friday—" Darwin and the Naked
Lady: Discursive Essays on Biology
and Art," by Alex Comfort. (Bro
ziller.)
—Other Books of the Current Week in Brief Review —
GENERAL
WHAT IS HISTORY? By
Edward Hallett Carr.
(Knopf; $3.50.) Professor
Carr of Trinity College
seeks to reconcile the doc
trine of progress with the
present state of the world.
RAINBOW IN THE ROCK.
By Irwin T. Sanders. (Har
vard; $7.50.) The land and
the people of rural Greece
is the subject of this new
study.
EMERGENT AMERICANS:
A report on “Crossroads
Africa.” By Harold R.
Isaacs. (John Day; $3.50.)
A description of the pri
vately financed forerunner
of the Peace Corps.
1962 WORLD ALMANAC
AND BOOK OF FACTS.
Edited by Harry Hansen.
(New York World-Tele
gram and The Sun; $2.)
1962 NATIONAL CATHOLIC
ALMANAC. Edited by Feli
cia A. Foy, O. F. M. (St.
Anthony’s Guild, Distrib
uted by Doubleday; $2.95.)
Up to date Catholic facts
and information in one
volume.
HAS MAN A FUTURE? By
Bertrand Russell. (Simon
& Schuster; $3.) Lord Rus
sell presents an exam
ination of the causes of to
day’s world crisis and a
plan for attaining and
securing a stable and
peaceful world. (Reprint.)
COMMON SENSE ABOUT
PSYCHOANALYSIS. By
Rudolph Wittenberg.
(Doubleday; $3.95.) In this
book, Dr. Wittenberg, dis
turbed by the many mis
conceptions and confusions
about psychoanalysis at
tempts to explain and an-
From a Psychiatrist's
Private Notebook
By MARY McGRORY
Star Stan Writer
CASSANDRA AT THE WEDDING. By Dorothy Baker
(Houghton-Mifflin; $4.)
Dorothy Baker’s new novel is the story of an unusual
triangle. The principals are Cassandra Edwards, her twin
sister Judith, and Judith’s fiance, a graduate medical student
named John Thomas Finch.
Cassandra speaks first. Out of the side of her mouth she
tells us what we need to know about her: That she is a grad
uate student at Berkelely, wretched without her twin; that
she is in psychoanalysis, that men set her teeth on edge. She
is about to race back to her
ranch home in the valley,
ostensibly to attend her sis
ter at her wedding, but actu
ally to break it up if she can.
A Sister Fixation
At the ranch, she is wel
comed by her father, a re
tired philosopher who is
working on a study of pyr
rhonic skepticism with steady
infusions of five-star brandy.
(His wife, who has been dead
for three years, was more
“like somebody’s little
brother”). Grandmother, a
fluttery, elegant, shatter
ingly conventional figure
among the eccentics, never
heard of a girl being in love
with her own sister, and does
not believe this is the case
when told.
The suspense of the first
half of the book turns on the
question of who will win the
girl. John Thomas sees his
Mathematicians
Are Popularizing
Their Science
NEW MATHEMATICAL LI
BRARY: Six Titles. (Ran
dom House; $1.95 each.)
These Interesting paper
backs are encouraging ear
nests of the professional
mathematician’s expressed
desire to make his science
interesting to the lay public
—if not necessarily intelli
gible. These six books are, in
a sense, popularizations—but
popularizations that assume
their readers have brains
and are prepared to use
them. They cover a range of
topics, some quite basic,
some quite advanced.
A Washington man is the
author of one of the six
books. He is Philip J. Davis
of the National Bureau of
Standards, and his “Lore of
Large Numbers” is No. 6 in
the series. I found it one of
the most Interesting for cas
ual reading. If you wonder
what comes after trillions, or
what a 969-digit prime num
ber looks like—or pi to 4,000
decimal places Dr. Davis
has the answer for you.
Other books in the series,
in numerical order, are:
1. "Numbers: Rational and
Irrational,” by Ivan Niven.
2. "What Is Calculus
About”? by W. W. Sawyer.
3. "An Introduction to In
equalities,” by Edwin Beck
enbach and Richard Bell
man.
4. “Geometric Inequali
ties,” by Nicholas D. Kaz
arinoff.
5. “The Contest Problem
Book,” compiled by Charles
T. Salkind.
This last will appeal to
amateur math sharks, being
a compilation of the Mathe
matical Association of Amer
ica’s annual contests for high
school students from 1950
through 1960. Answers are
supplied in the back of the
book.
—WILLIAM HINES.
swer many questions about
what it can and cannot do.
PARLIAMENTARY PROCE
DURE. By Warren Leh
man. (A Tudor Text,
Doubleday; $4.95.) A com
plete course in parliamen
tary procedure.
DANIEL MORGAN: Revolu
tionary Rifleman. By Don
Higginbotham. (University
of North Carolina; $6.) A
biography of this colorful
Revolutionary leader whose
military career was cli
maxed by his command of
the Americans at the Bat
tle of the Cowpens.
ANATOMY OF THE FU
TURE. By Roderick Seiden
berg. (University of North
Carolina; $3.50.) The
author of Prehistoric Man
now sees the individual
finally disappearing in a
society increasingly "mas
sified.”
THREE REGIONS OF
PRIMITIVE ART. By Hal
lam L. Movius, Jr., S. Koo
ijman and George Kubler.
(Museum of Primitive Art;
$3.50.) These three papers
were given in the second
lecture series of the Mu
seum of Primitive Art.
THE RIVER OF LIFE: The
Story of Man's Blood from
Magic to Science. By Ber
nard Seeman. (W. W. Nor
ton & Co.; $4.50.) This
traces the development of
man’s knowledge to the
blood, and discusses the in
teraction of man and his
environment.
FICTION
THE SOUTHERN BLADE.
By Nelson and Shirley
Welford. (Morrow; $3.50.)
A historical novel of the
Civil War on the Western
frontier. The husband and
peril, marries his girl out of
hand at the blistering Bak
ersfield courthouse.
All In a Day
Meanwhile, back at the
ranch, Cassandra plans an
elopment of her own. She
tries, as she says to “marry
a bolt of black velvet cloth”
by taking an overdose of
sleeping pills. So John
Thomas, having rescued one
sister from an unnatural love,
must rescue the other from
death, all in the same day.
Miss Baker handles her
difficult double theme of in
cest and lesbianism most
deftly. Sometimes the story
almost topples over into the
merely grotesque, but it never
quite does. On the other hand
if it never strikes a universal
note about loneliness or
identity, what can you expect
from a special situation like
that?
Portrait
Os a Man
Os Power
ROBERT JOHN WALKER,
A POLITICIAN FROM
JACKSON TO LINCOLN.
By James P. Shenton.
(Columbia Press; $6.)
Robert John Walker, who
started out in life in a poli
tical job for which he re
ceived good pay but did no
work, was not the always
honest, straightforward man
we like to think of as influ
encing the Nation. But in
fluence he did, from the ad
ministration of Andrew
Jackson to that of Lincoln.
And the influence was not
all bad. Walker was a Sena
tor from Mississippi, yet be
came a champion of free soil
and a propagandist for the
Union. He thought b’g, back
ing free trade, coast-to-coast
railway systems and national
expansion, including the an
nexation of Canada.
For the Cause
Small and so vain he dyed
his hair, he flew over London
in a balloon and descended
into Chesapeake Bay in a
submarine for political rea
sons but also, one must sus
pect, for personal glorifica
tion.
He recorded little about
himself, thus lending cre
dence to stories of his polit
ical shenanigans and at the
same time unjustly reducing
his place in history. However,
the late Emil E. Hurja, pub
lisher and editor of the old
Pathfinder magazine, did
manage to collect many let
ters and effects of the mys
terious Walker. Mr. Hurja
planned a biography but
died in 1953 before it could
be written.
Mr. Hurja’s widow, Mrs.
Gudrun A. Hunt of 5628
Western avenue, Chevy
Chase, made the Walker ma
terial available to Dr. James
P. Shenton of Columbia Uni
versity, whose cleanly writ
ten Walker biography adds
to the understanding of the
forces active before and dur
ing the Civil War. ’
—WILLIAM GRIGG.
wife writing team are the
authors of “Green Grow
the Rushes.”
THE YEAR OF PROTEST.
Edited and translated by
Hugh McLean and Walter
N. Vickery, (Vintage;
$1.45.) An anthology of So
viet literary material.
THE BEST SHORT STOR
IES OF RUDYARD KIP
LING: With an Introduc
tion by Randall Jarrell.
(Doubleday & Co.; $6.95.)
The first major collection
of Kipling stories in many
years. Mr. Jarrell recom
mends these stories in
a realistic introduction
wherein _he says he’s
“ashamed of their faults
but exalted by their vir
tues.” The best possible
way to make the acquaint
ance of a major, if con
troyersial, author.
THE CAPTAIN WITH THE
WHISKERS. By Benedict
Kiely. (Criterion; $4.50.)
Mr. Kiely is n Dubliner.
His novel concerns the
Captain and his five chil
dren, doomed by their
father’s tyranny.
GOD’S HIGH TABLE. By
Leland Frederick Cooley.
(Doubleday; $5.95.) An
adventure-romance of the
Pacific Northwest, set in
the late nineteenth cen
tury.
NOTES FROM A DARK
STREET. By Edward Adler.
(Knopf; $2.95.) Set in New
York City's Lower East
Side slums, this first novel
is a record of a week’s
joumeyings by one man.
THE HI LO COUNTRY. By
Max Evans. (Macmillan;
$3.50.) The story of two
men, their mutual love for
one woman, and their al
legiance to the New Mexi
can land.
THE SUNDAY STAR
Washington, D. C.„ February 4,1962
From “Frontier Living” written and illustrated by Edwin Tunis.
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS
History Marches on in Bright
Pages of Children's Books
By BARBARA NOLEN
Contrlbutlnz Writer
February is the traditional month of heroes and holi
days. Time was when such emphasis did little more than
pieserve sentimental legends of Washington and Lincoln.
Gradually, as diaries and contemporary documents have be
come available, the images of Washington and Lincoln have
taken on color and life.
Happily, now, the shadowy past is becoming peopled with
an increasing number of colorful images. Using historical
research like a telescopic lens, the skilful author brings the
past into focus so that the reader feels the truth of the words
inscribed on the Archives ——
Building: What is past is
prologue.
In her biographies of Bow
ditch, Maury and Cyrus
Field, Jean Lee Latham dem
onstrated that the fictional
approach does not need to
distort the central image.
Her success started a trend.
Familiar Names
To twist the usual cliche,
many names and faces of the
past are familiar but what do
we really know of the man
behind the face? A new bi
ography by Nardi Reeder
Campion provides a splendid
close-up of PATRICK HEN
RY, FIREBRAND OF THE
REVOLUTION (Little,
Brown. $3.75.) Good readers
of ten and up will enjoy dis
covering that Patrick Henry
was much more than a “gold
en-tongued orator” who pro
vided so many fighting words.
Mrs. Campion has a golden
Spanish Novelist Charms
Us in Ist Translation
NAKED IN PICCADILLY. By
E. Salazar Chapela. Trans
lated from the Spanish by
Patricia Crampton. (Abe
lard-Schuman; $4.)
E. Salazar Chapela left his
native Spain during the
Spanish Civil War and set
tled in Great Britain, where
he has worked as London
correspondent for Spanish
language newspapers, lec
tured at Cambridge Univer
sity, and written novels. The
novels have become popular
in Latin America. “Naked in
Piccadilly” is the first to be
translated into English, and
it brings to American readers
a wickedly enchanting tale.
The hero, an Englishman,
was once exceptionally obese.
By means of a war wound
followed by a surgical rarity,
he slims down to a “classi
cally sculptured” figure. His
voice is deepened and he is
rendered bald. He has be
come unrecognizable. The life
he chooses from then on is
sheer delight even amongst
its difficulties.
PAPERBACKS
DECISIVE BATTLES OF
THE CIVIL WAR. By Lt.
Col. Joseph B. Mitchell.
(A Premier Book, Fawcett;
75 cents.) Os particular
importance to the modern
reader is the fact that bat
tles and campaigns have
been mapped on present
day highway maps which
show the old roads of the
period and the new roads
of today. (Reprint.)
PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF
U. S. GRANT. Introduc
tion by Philip Van Doren
Stem (A Premier Book,
Fawcett; 75 cents.) A mod
ern abridgement.
THE CONFEDERATE RAID
ER ALABAMA. By Her
Commander Admiral Ra-
utye S’uniiay £>tar ! |
WEEKLY BOOK SURVEY §
The Sunday Star has arranged with z'£ g o
some of the leading book sellers of S > f z
Washington and suburban areas to re- %< 2 g' o o
port each week the books which sell best ~ j 5 . _ J 5
as a guide to what Washington is read- “ ■ 5 o s w
ing. The numbers represent the rank “ J 2 & « § 2
of each book among best sellers at the “ £ * :<2 < * “ s
store named. z ® o
For Week Ending February 2,1962 J S J J i
"... action - - ;h1 Irr
1. "Agony and Ecstasy," Stone *(3) |6 23 2 5 1
2. "Franny and Zooey," Salinger *(1) 11 | 1 j |3 | 1 2
3- e Me," Dennis *(2) _ I 2'3 | | |4!4~l 5
4- "To Kill 0 Mockingbird," Lee *(4) |4| | 12 5 3
?i_lAJDanceJo the JMuiic of Time," Powell *(-)” 5 i~T4 3
6. "Chairman of the Bored," Streeter *H | ”| j 13 Yj f -
NONFICTION ]
LlMyLife in Court," Nizer *Q) |5 ; 1 2T3TT 1 |T
2. "The Making of the President," White ‘(1) ,12 3 4 2~ 2 6
3. "Calories Don't Count," Taller *(5) 6I 3 51 5 3
4. "C. I. A. The Inside Story," Tully ‘(6) |2 15 11 i 2 I
5. "Living Free," Adamson *(3) 34 4 y
6. "Leaning on a Column," Dizon *(4) 4| | | |3* y _
‘Last Week's Rating.
tongue herself in describing
the life and times of Patrick
Henry. She writes: The Hen
rys had eleven children. Ten
of them were plain, honest
sparrows; but one, for some
unfathonable reason, was an
eagle.
It is a notable biography,
for its scintillating portrait
of a brilliant “ugly duckling,”
and for the way she also
brings into focus the fire
brand’s relationship with his
socially superior contempo
raries, Washington and Jef
ferson.
Lesson in Courage
Another champion of
change, Theodore Roosevelt,
is expertly portrayed for
younger children by Frances
Cavanah in ADVENTURE IN
COURAGE (Rand, McNally.
$2.95.) Her emphasis is on
Roosevelt’s youth and on the
development of moral cour-
The hero contrives an an
nouncement of his former
self’s death, but first wills his
new self a legacy. He gets
his old job back—under bet
ter conditions. As his wife
plunges unwittingly into big
amy with a new husband, he
does not claim her, being
fully aware that to become
her lover during her new
"marriage” presents no moral
problem at all.
If the author treats moral
conventions and casualties
lightly (one baby is charm
ingly orphaned), he might be
excused partly because he
writes in fantasy and partly
because, by sweeping aside
conventionalities, he leaves
the stage bare for more im
aginative meditation on the
morals and psychology of
men and women.
Mr. Chapela, however,
never labors moral points. His
purpose is to entertain, and
English readers are now for
tunate to be among his au
dience.
—MARY FAITH WILSON.
phael Semmes. Edited, with
an introduction by Philip
Van Doren Stern. (A Pre
mier Book, Fawcett; 75
cents.) Selections from
memoirs of service afloat
during the War Between
the States.
THE GODS WERE NEU
TRAL. By Major Robert
Crisp. (Ballantine; 50
cents.) The story of the
tank troops—their rigorous
training and their bravery
and skill in combat. Major
Crisp is the author of
“Brazen Chariots.”
A WALK ON The wild
SIDE. By Nelson Algren. (A
Crest Book, Fawcett; 50
cents.) A reprint of the
best seller, currently a
movie starring Laurence
Harvey and Capucine.
C-5
Books
age in overcoming physical
weaknesses.
Theodore Roosevelt’s life
i was full of flamboyant ad
venture as well as social
issues. Roosevelt once said:
“I put myself in the way of
things happening, and they
happened.” Miss Cavanah
has no difficulty in making
this image appealing and :n
--1 teresting to the younger
reader.
An American Legend
So much has been written
about Mark Twain that he
has become almost as much
an American legend as Tom
Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn,
Through this maze of leg
end, Sterling North has deft
ly picked a new trail in his
North Star biography, MARK
TWAIN AND THE RIVER
(Houghton, Mifflin. $1.95).
Mr. North uses the objective
approach, and writes a solid,
interesting book which in
terprets Mark Twain as the
spokesman of an important
transitional period.
Ralph Moody’s WELLS
FARGO (Houghton. $1.95)
puts the Pony Express in
historical perspective. It is
exciting to discover that
Wells Fargo had its full share
of masked highwaymen, gold
dust treasure boxes, and gun
shot messengers.
In SACAJAWEA, Guide to
Lewis and Clark (Houghton,
Mifflin; $1.95), Jerry Siebert
brings her biographical skill
to an oft-told story. Scorn
ing the crutch of imaginary
details, she selects for
younger readers the crucial
facts of this extraordinary
exploration through Indian
country. Not in any sense
new material, it still has
fresh appeal because it is so
skilfully written.
On the Frontier
The large, flat, pictorial
informational books written
and illustrated by Edwin
Tunis, crammed with pen and
ink sketches of wheels, weap
ons, or Indians have estab
lished a place for themselves.
Details of boats, forts, cos
tumes, and games evidently
fascinate Tunis as they fas
cinate youngsters.
frontier living
(World. $5.95) is the latest
by Edwin Tunis. In his fore
word, Tunis stresses his phi
losophy of the frontier, as
an alternative to the images
set up by Fenimore Cooper
and the TV screen. He says:
"There was a lot more to
frontier living than running
gunfights ending in necktie
parties.” And he proves the
fascination of the frontier
he describes so vividly in
word and picture.
Historical Fiction
Another approach to his
tory is used by Allen P. Clark
■ in two new titles: GROWING
UP IN THE WILD WEST
and GROWING UP IN CO
LONIAL AMERICA. (Sterl
ing; $2.95 each.) These are
frankly fiction, but the fic
tional themes are deeply
imbedded in history. They
achieve good characteriza
tion and style, so that they
appeal on both the adventure
and informational levels
Jackie Peters is a Nebraska
boy "captivated” by Crow
Indians. Ben Mason is a New
England boy who escapes
from the farm. Both books
offer individual stories, bet
ter than the series title
would indicate. The only
drawback, aside from the
title, is a squarish format
which offers too long a type
line—a readability hazard.
Astronaut
What about that other man
of courage, the astronaut?
From headlines and the TV
screen, children turn to
books for more substantial
interpretation. The following
are all geared to answer such
persistent questions as: How
is an astronaut trained?
What does he eat? What
does he wear? What are the
safety controls? What will
happen next?
THE ASTRONAUTS, PIO
NEERS IN SPACE. By the
editors of Life. (Golden
Press.)
SPACE IN YOUR FU
TURE. By Leo Schneider.
(Harcourt; $3.75.)
PIONEERING IN SPACE.
By Walter B. Hendrickson.
(Bobbs, Merrill.)
ALIVE IN SPACE. Bv Rob
ert Wells. (Little. Brown
-53.75.)
AMERICA’S FIRST
SPACEMAN. By Jewel
Spangler Smaus. (Double
day; $2.50.)
navigation in the
JET AGE. By Robert Wells.
(Dodd, Mead; $3.)

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