OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 18, 1962, Image 106

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1962-03-18/ed-1/seq-106/

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SUNDAY. THE STAR MAGAZINE. WASHINGTON. D. C., MARCH 18. 1082
Hit MOiH Biiizlae
PHILIP H. LOVE ROBERT A. HOKE
Edit* Art Diractor
MARCH 18, 1962
Sign of Spring, by Eva luomo 1
Star Doi* 2
"Say Something Clover About Dinosaurs,"
by Myra MacPherson and Tom Hoy 4
Mr. and Mrs. Musician!, by Ruth Deon 6
The Cartoonists* Kennedy 9
Wild Flowers Along the Canal, by Eileen J Williams
and Harold Marshall Williams 10
Retirement Cabin in the Maine Woods, by Jim Birchfield 12
The Civil War As Reported By The Star 100 Years Ago:
Rebel Missouri Drive Halted At Fea Ridge,
compiled by John W Stepp 14
Heading for Market : 16
Versatile Vehicle 18
Star Dust
THE FRONT COVER
I AST SUNDAY, you may recall, we presented a “Sure Sign
j of Spring.” namely a feature on some kids making and Hy
ing kites. And in the preview items at the bottom of this column,
we promised a different “Sign of Spring" for this issue and
asked, “Can you guess what?” Well, the promised “Sign of
Spring” is, of course, the crocus which the little girl is so obvi
ously delighted to discover in the colorphoto reproduced on
our cover. Was a crocus your guess? Or were you thinking
of a robin-or what?
RECOGNITION
OUR SERIES on “The Civil War as Reported by The Star
100 Years Ago” (page 14) has won for The Star an Award
of Distinction (see page 18). It is the first such recognition given
to any publication by the Civil War Centennial Commission,
and in presenting it, James I. Robertson, executive director of
the commission, described it as a “very signal honor” given
only for “outstanding scholarship.”
As astronaut John H. Glenn, jr., said of his sensational
orbital flight. The Star’s Civil War series is the work of a team.
Staff Writer John W. Stepp compiled the material from The
Star of a century ago, but for his Background articles and inter
polations, he had to do extensive research in the Library of
Congress, the National Archives, the Confederate Museum
in Richmond, and the Mariners Museum in Newport News.
In all this work, and in tracking down the best contemporary
illustrations, he has had the benefit of the fullest cooperation
of Milton Kaplan and his colleagues in the Prints and Photo
graphs Division of the Library of Congress, Josephine Cobb
and her colleagues in the National Archives, and the staffs
of the two Virginia museums. On what might be called “the
home front,” Art Director Robert A. Hoke and Staff Artist
Art Mullins have made invaluable contributions to “the war
effort” in the form of attractive and interesting layouts.
Sixty-two of the most important articles in the series have
been published in a handsome book, “Mirror of War” (Prentice-
Hall, Inc.; $12.50), under the joint byline of Mr. Stepp and
I. William Hill, managing editor of The Star. Mr. Hill, the
“father” of the series in the sense that he conceived the idea
and directed its execution, edited the 378-page volume and
contributed the introduction, “A Newspaper As A Mirror of
War."
Anonymous members of the team include the staff of The
Star library; the typesetters, who have had the difficult task
of trying to approximate the typography in vogue 100 years
ago, and the proof readers, who have had to restrain the im
pulse to “correct" some of the quaint phraseology and factual
inconsistencies of the old news accounts. All these people
and perhaps some we have inadvertently overlooked —have a
share in the Civil War Centennial Commission’s Award of
Distinction to The Star “in Recognition of Distinguished and
Extraordinary Contribution to the Observance of the One
Hundredth Anniversary of the Civil War.” To all hands, we
say. borrowing another astronautical term: A-OK!

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