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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 18, 1962, Image 2

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THE SUNDAY STAR
Washington, 0. C„ March 19, 1962
Army Tightens Grip
On Guatemala Capital
GUATEMALA, Mar. 17 (AP),—The army tightened its
Eip on this crisis-torn capital tonight and opposition political
aders were reported considering an appeal by President
Miguel Ydigoras to seek an end to a student-led revolt.
Scattered shooting incidents, but no major trouble marked
the fifth day of the crisis as heavily armed soldiers put the city
under virtual martial law.
Earlier clashes and disorders
killed about 20 persons and
wounded at least 500.'
Th newspaper Las Hora said
a check of police lists showed
more than 800 persons jailed.
Leftist leaders of two oppo
sition parties were arrested in
a raid and then released after
being taken to President Ydi
goras. One of the leaders said
Mr. Ydigoras wanted to make
a deal to settle the crisis and
the offer was being considered.
Election Frauds Charged
The students launched vio
lent protests against alleged
frauds in last December’s elec
tions in which Mr. Ydigoras’
Conservative Party scored an
easy victory. Mr. Ydigoras con
tends the complaints are base
less and says Communists and
Castro elements embarked on
disorder to cover their disap
pointment at the election re
sults.
In the police raid on the po
litical meeting the leader of
the Guatemalan Christian
Democracy Party, two former
deputies of that party and two
former deputies of the leftist
National Liberation Movement
were arrested.
Mario Mendez Montenegro,
former presidential condidate
of the leftist Revolutionary
Party, was reported to have
driven up to the house just as
the raid took place but escaped.
With the city under a mili
tary curfew from 8 p.m. to 5
a.m., the army drafted postal,
telegraph, power company and
bus line workers to keep es
sential services moving, as more
and more employes went on
strike in sympathy with the
students.
Half-Holiday Announced
The government announced a
half holiday for its workeds as
reports of absenteeism in gov
ernment offices mounted. Gov
ernment offices normally close
at noon Saturday.
Despite militarization of pri
vately owned city bus lines,
fewer buses than usual made
the rounds.
Many businesses closed and
other half lowered their shut
ters. Merchants said many of
their employes could not get
transportation to work or were
afraid to come out.
Because of the emergency, a
scheduled lottery drawing was
postponed.
Nine of the Nation’s 18 ra
dio stations were off the air in
protest against censorship. One
station manager said police
killed five persons in a crowd
that gathered when police raid
ed his station because it made
an uncensored broadcast.
Blood Donors Sought
Stations that continued on
the air broadcast appeals for
blood donors and special An
nouncements from the govern
ment.
Telegraph service was mili
tarized after the Association of
Telegraph Operators denounced
violent polioe action. The gov-
THE FEDERAL SPOTLIGHT
Court Ruling Saves Jobs for 2,200,
Upsets Navy's Firing Technique
By JOSEPH YOUNG
Star Staff Writer
In an important decision, the
Federal court here has cracked
down on an oft-used device in
Government to fire employes
by transferring their functions
to other units.
Judge Edward M. Curran of
District Court has ordered the
retention of 2,200 Navy shop
analysts and schedulers in var
ious Navy shipyards through
out the country.
Judge Curran said the Navy
had failed to comply with the
Veterans Preference Act which
requires that when a Federal
function is transferred the em
ployes performing the function
must also be transferred before
additional employes are hired
or assigned from any source.
Judge Curran set aside a
Civil Service Commission rul
ing that a “function is a mis- i
sion” and that because several
Navy units were engaged in the'
same “mission” a transfer of
functions did not occur.
The Veterans Preference Act
provision protecting Federal i
employes against loss of job
when their functions are trans
ferred elsewhere applies to
non-veterans as well as to
veterans.
The case was financed by
the National Association of
Naval Shop Analysts and
Schedulers and Shop Planners.
The attorney representing them
was Donald M. Murtha.
** * *
FEDERAL PAYROLL HERE
—The Federal payroll for the
Washington area—the salaries
of Government, judicial and
legislative employes—is near
the $2 billion-a-year mark. The
latest figure is $1,807,536,000.
This does not include the
many millions in salaries drawn
by private industry employes’
working for private contractors
engaged in putting up new
Government buildings here, etc.
It’s easy to see what a tre
mendous impact the Federal
Government has on the econ
omy of the Washington area.
** * «
SCOPE— Since Federal clas
sified and postal employes still
1 ernment announced the associ-
I ation was dissolved.
The conservative newspaper
Impacto published a resolution
from the municipal corporation
of Guatemala denouncing
abuses “by public forces and
shock groups” brought into the
capital to restore order. The
resolution said these forces
“made use of procedures un
worthy of civilized people and
of responsible government.”
The newspaper’s editorial
declared “Ydigoras must be
forced to resign. He will not
resign of his own volition. It is
a pity because an immediate
departure would be better in
stead of falling by force.”
500 Wounded Treated
Major hospitals reported 500
wounded persons had been
treated since the start of the
disturbances and that seven
died. The general hospital said
95 per cent of the injured there
were suffering from gunshot
wounds.
The hospitals said they treat
ed 153 wounded persons yester
day. The newspaper Impacto
said five were killed.
Doctors said it was possible
that all the dead were not
taken to morgues and that
some wounded may not have
been treated at hospitals.
Seven policemen were re
ported beaten by an angry
crowd at a cemetery yesterday
during burial services for some
victims of street fights.
The government said two po
licemen were killed in yester
day’s disorders, in which a bus,
an automobile and a jeep were
burned.
Troops stalked two guerrila
rebel bands still roaming in
east and northeast Guatemala.
One band was led by Carlos
Paz Tejada, defense minister
under pro-Communist Presi
dent Jacobo Arbenz Guzman,
who was overthrown by an in
vading force of rebels in 1954.
Mr. Arbenz has been reported
a guest of the Fidel Castro gov
ernment in Cuba for months.
The other band was reported
to include remnants of former
army officers calling them
selves the 13th of November
Movement, who attempted a
leftist revolt at Puerto Bar
rios and Zacapa on November
13, 1960.
Leftists Assail Ydigoras
President Ydigoras has been
under mounting attack from
leftists since anti-Castro Cu
bans were trained in Guate
malan camps for the Bay of
Pigs invasion last April.
Identical Brothers
Wed Identical Twins
LONDON, Mar. 17 (AP).—
Identical twin sisters married
identical twin brothers at Dur
ham, England, today.
Ann Callaghan, 20, was mar
ried to Brian Jones, 23, and in
the other half of the double
wedding Kathleen Callaghan
was married to David Jones.
deal with Congress on matters
of salaries and fringe bene
fits, many Government workers
are asking just how much im
pact President Kennedy’s new
labor - management relations
order for the Federal service
will have.
A. E. Casgrain, president of
the American Federation of
Government Employes Council
of Defense Lodges, declares that
the labor-management program
will have wide scope.
Mr. Casgrain said employe
unions will deal with manage
ment on working conditions
such as use of office space,
light, air conditioning, cafe
teria and restaurant services,
rest periods, scheduling of
hours, parking, sanitary condi
tions, etc.
Also, wage board rates (for
blue collar workers), job classi
fications for classified employes
and job assignments, promotion
plans, training opportunities
and career development.
! In addition, grievance pro
cedures, counseling, health
services, physical exams in
cluding health protection shots.
Then, too, Mr. Casgrain lists
welfare services and use of
non-appropriated funds for
recreation, health or welfare
services, credit union or other
banking facilities, safety pro
grams to prevent on-the-job
and off-the-job accidents
among employes, traffic regu
lations and parking privileges.
Civilian-military staffing
; problems, employe utilization
. and allocation of overtime and
, overtime rates are also matters
I which Mr. Casgrain feels are
subjects for negotiation be
. i tween employe unions and
.'management.
»♦ ♦ *
i AID REPORT— FowIer Ham
ilton, administrator of the
si Agency for International De
velopment, has told a House
. Civil Service Subcommittee on
■ Manpower that 79 of the 274
I career employes dismissed from
• the agency in its new setup
. were now employed in other
Government departments and
- agencies and in Industry.
1 Mr. Fowler said AID had
m
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THIS WAS ONE CAR UNTIL . . .
Forces as powerful as a giant cleaver broke this car into two relatively
intact sections last night on Kenilworth avenue just off the Baltimore-
Washington Parkway when the car skidded into a light pole. The driver,
Mrs. Viola Nelson, 44, of 5708 Addison Chapel road, Prince Georges
County, Md., was reported in critical condition at Casualty Hospital with
head injuries.—Star Staff Photo by Francis Routt.
ra
INSP. WALTER W. LANGE
CAPT. DAVID KUSHNER
•—Star Staff Photo
made successful placements for
57 employes, and 22 others have
exercised re-employment rights
in other Government agencies.
He said AID will continue to
try to find jobs for the other
employes and will be happy to
co-operate with the House unit
in this venture.
** * *
CAPITAL ROUNDUP—Ed
ward J. Vallario of the Atomic
Energy Commission has been
given a heroism award for his
part in rescuing five injured
and trapped men in a reactor
explosion.
The Financial Management
Roundtable will discuss "The
Responsibilities of the Control
ler in Accumulating, Reporting
and Evaluating Financial Man
agement Information” at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday, March 27, in the
General Accounting Office
auditorium. Participating will
be Brig. Gen. Duward Crow,
Air Force; P. O. O’Connell,
Navy; J. B. Schravesande,
Army; Capt. E. R. Kingman,
Navy; and Thomas Coates,
Navy.
“Implications on Govern
ment R & D Programs of the
President’s Memorandum on
Conflict of Interest” will be
discussed by Assistant Attorney
General Nicholas de B. Katzen
bach at a meeting of the Re
search and Engineering Man
agement Roundtable at 7:30
p.m. Thursday, April 5, at the
Brookings Institution audito
i rium, 1775 Massachusetts ave
nue N.W. Others participating
; will be Dr. David Price, Na
i tional Institutes of Health;
Walter Sohier, National Aero
nautics and Space Administra
tion; Adam Yarmolinsky, De
fense Department; and William
Mautz, Johns Hopkins Univer
sity.
Fort Belvoir has given pro
motions to John Johnson,
Charles Freeman, Raul Rodri
guez, John Singleton, jr., Frank
Rudder, Robbins Hickson, Bela
' Bodnar, Charles Manor, C. Ed
ward Westerman, Edward De-
I Meter, Dale Howell, Robert
Macchia and Howard Mc
l Comas.
PARK
Continued From Page A-l
Interior Department officials
not connected with the Park
Service, based its findings on
promotion standards and ex
aminations of the Civil Service
Commission and the depart
ment.
Mr. Wirth said the appoint
ments mean that two vacancies
for lieutenant now exist and
that new examinations will be
given to fill these openings.
Inspector Lange Joined Na
tional Parks in 1938 and became
a Park Policeman in 1942. He
made lieutenant in March,
1960. He recently was grad
uated from the National Acad
emy of the Federal Bureau of
Investigation and has attended,
other special police courses at
Northwestern, Maryland and
American universities. He lives
at 6220 Raleigh road S.E.
Capt. Kushner joined the
Park Police in 1942 and was
made lieutenant in March, 1960.
He also has attended several
police courses at area universi
ties and Northwestern. He lives
at 4110 Third street, Arlington,
Va.
Mr. Wirth noted that the
Park Police Force is requesting
additional men and the House
Appropriations Committee re
port last week recommended 15
new officers for the force. “We
hope to move ahead and
strengthen the force,” he said,
“and it will stay agood outfit if
the squabbling stops.”
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CAFFUTZ MANAGEMENT
Medical Care Plan
Debate Scheduled
Two representatives from the
field of medicine will debate
the President’s plan for medi
cal care of the aged at the third
in the Northwest Community
Forum Series at 8 p.m. Wed
nesday in Janney Elementary
School, Albemarle street and
Wisconsin avenue N.W.
The speakers will be James
W. Forsitel, legislative repre
sentative of the American Med
ical Association, speaking
against the plan, and Dr. Frank
Furstenberg, medical director
of the out-patient department
of Sinai Hospital, Baltimore,
who will speak for the plan.
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RE. 7-0975 Above Metropolitan Theatre CHARGE
Buddy of Ted Kennedy
Runs for House Seat
By DAVID S. BRODER
Star Staff Writer
The epidemic itch for public
office that afflicts the Ken
nedys and so many of their
friends has spread now to
Houston, Tex., where Claude E.
Hooten, jr., a Harvard chum
and frequent traveling compa
nion of Edward M. (Ted) Ken
nedy, is running for the House
of Representatives.
Mr. Hooten, a wealthy, 30-
year-old home builder and real
estate developer, filed against
incumbent Democratic Repre
sentative Bob Casey last month,
then buzzed off for a quick tour
of Europe and the Middle East
with Teddy, who has Just an
nounced his own senatorial
candidacy in Massachusetts.
Now Mr. Hooten is back home
again and he said yesterday
things are “going very well” in
a race where most neutral ob
serve™ concede him only the
remotest chance.
Mr. Hooten is running in the
22d district—the wealthy, con
servative Southern half of Har
ris County, which went almost
3-to-2 Republican in the 1960
presidential race. Most Texas
politicians figure Mr. Hooten’s
close ties with the Kennedys
and his indorsement by the lo-
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cal AFL-CIO Committee on Po
litical Education will not help
him in his battle against Mr.
Casey, who votes a somewhat
conservative line.
White House spokesmen dis
claim any part in the Hooten
candidacy, as they do in the
case of Ted Kennedy’s run for
the Senate. Friends of Mr.
Casey, however, say they think
it unlikely he would have Mr.
Hooten as an opponent if he
had voted more consistently as
the administration wished.
Congressional Quarterly re
ports that Mr. Casey opposed
the President more often than
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Our 60th Year
I he supported him on both do
meitic and foreign policy is
| sues last Year.
In an interview, Mr. Hooten
i denied he was the “Kennedy
candidate” in the primary;
adding, in familiar words, “I
am running strictly on my
own.”
His chief campaign planks,
he said, are strong support for
the Alliance for Progress and
advocacy of the United States’
joining the European Common
Market.
Mr. Hooten and the youngest’
Kennedy brother became close
friends as Harvard classmates
from 1950 to 1954 and Mr.
Hooten was an usher at Ted
Kennedy’s wedding in 1958. Ih
the 1960 campaign, he served
as Ted’s deputy in the manage
ment of the Western States.
campaign for the President.

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