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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 18, 1962, Image 50

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D-12
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Hyacinths are glorified in this arrangement keyed to very early spring.
Composed by Mrs. Herbert H. Greger.—Star Staff Photo.
j -
Beauty in Flowers
By MRS HERBERT H GREGER
Hyacinths and Daffodils in Opposition
One of the cherished pleas
ures of a gardner is the sight
of his spring bulbs in flower.
The crocus, grape hyacinth,
snowdrops, the daffodils and
hyacinths provide such an eye
ful of color and beauty that
even the timid soul feels posi
tively successful. I love all
flowers, but if I had to choose,
I would say please give me
hyacinths for spring.
Memory is filled with fra
grance from here and fragrance
from there and, as the seasons
change, they reappear like
friends who never change. No
matter which way the wind
may blow, springtime fills my
garden with a heady aroma,
and for a certain time the
hyacinth is queen of my world.
The hanging gardens of Baby
lon could have had no greater
pleasure, ijo happier spring.
Some people want everything
to last forever and this a hya
cinth cannot do. After a few
seasons the bulb loses its
strength, the dense clusters of
bloom start to look straggly.
This is no sin, it gave every
thing it had most generously.
It is no task to plant a few
fresh bulbs each year. You can
still have the same colors and
the same fragrances year after
year.
The container in today’s ar-
STAR SERVICE
TO GARDENERS
THIS WEEK
Wilbur H. Youngman,
Star garden editor, will
assist at the following
events this week.
Today, 3 p.m.—Rose
pruning demonstration, Ar
lington Rose Foundation,
Memorial Rose Garden,
Seventeenth and Edison
streets, Arlington, Va.
Monday, 8 p.m.—Spring
Planting for the Fall
Show, St. John’s Episcopal
Church, Fifth and Lexing
ton streets, Glencarlyn
Garden Club, Arlington,
Va.
Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.—
“Plants for Washington
Area Gardens,” Junior
League of Washington,
3545 Williamsburg lane.
Wednesday, 12:15 p.m.—
Discussion of pruning.
Bureau of Public Roads
Building, Room 158, 1717
H street N.W.
Wednesday, 8 p.m.—
"Soils and Soil Improve
ment,” Potomac Chrys
anthemum Society, Per
petual Building, Wisconsin
avenue and Montgomery
avenue, Bethesda, Md.
>. Thursday, 12:30 p.m.—
."Annuals for ’62,” Prince
Georges Ki-Wives, Prince
Georges Country Club,
Landover, Md.
Saturday, 10 a.m.—Prun
ing demonstration, resi
dence of J. Keato, 305 Dean
drive, Rockville, Md. To
reach take Viers Mill road
to left on Broadwood drive
to left on Grandin avenue
to Dean drive.
JS CHOOSE THE
/§ MUSTANG THAT
uLw SUITS YOUR
TILLING
Tl NEEDS
I 51 W V
Sup&L MaA{aMg 3, hpaU .
purpose tiller. Tine extensions avail
able to 46'v-inch tilling width.
Quickly adjustable depth shoe.
Forward and reverse speeds Easy
Spin starter.
$154.50
411 N. Y. Ave. N.E. LI. 7-4800
Free Parking rn Our lot
1220 H St. N.W. NA. 8-0091
Member Park & Shop, Inc.
Store Hours; Mon.-Sat., 8-5
THE SUNDAY STAR
Washington, D C., March 11, 1961
rangement is a low, rectangular
pottery bowl which is a soft
gray blue.
I feel that hyacinths, and
especially the deep blue ones,
are always at home in this con
tainer.
With distinctive sunny yellow
forms, a few trumpet daffodils
provide a crisp accent.
These two flowers are direct
opposites in color as well as
in physical structure. The large
clusters of the hyacinth appear I
rough textured to the eye while 1
the bright daffodils offer clear,
clean-cut surfaces. Such con
trast always makes for an in
teresting combination.
The thick, round leaves from
a tired cyclamen plant act
somewhat like a ground cover in
the arrangement and give width
at the base. They help stabilize
and consolidate the group and
unite the plant material with
the container.
Usually a garden looks more
restful if a gay flower border
has a background. It not only
provides elevation but it is a
practical shelter or windbreak
for the tender flowers.
In an arrangement of flow
ers, a background, perhaps of
branches, provides the struc
tural design which often helps
express your plan or idea.
Surely, most any branches;
from your bushes will gladly;
■ combine with your spring
■ flowers.
j I used the rough, still dor
mant branches of winged
euonymus (E. elatus) for I
wanted you to see that we are
still in very early spring. Your
memory can supply the fra
grance and you surely will
notice from where the wind
; blows.
I J
Friendship House
Sponsors Talks
Down-to-earth advice for
;city gardeners with limited
space and budgets are being
offered in a workshop at
Friendship House, 619 D street
S.E. Recently Dr. Francis de
Vos opened the series with a
talk on trees and shrubs for
small gardens.
Boris Timchenkd, L. A., who
designed President Kennedy’s
Georgetown garden, will con
duct the March 28 session on
planning gardens and patios
suitable for the Capitol Hill
area served by the settlement;
I house.
March 21, Nurseryman Frank.
Williams will talk about peren
i nials and the new miracle
growth products.
Wilbur H. Youngman, gar
| den editor of The Star, will
discuss annuals on April 4.
Home repair workshops will
be conducted Tuesday nights,
through April 3, by Wesley
Moss of the Hechinger Co.
All sessions are from 8 to
10 p.m.
\ VW M~WT~W~IT"T
n WHILE THEY UST n
□ CLUMP H
M BIRCH H
U •■-'O' u
M ju»»
f
$25.00 value $14.95 n
(No phon* ordert pleas*)
R NO SMALL H
■ OAOmi- DELIVERIES ■
H Q
tween Bethesda and Rock-
y Ville. WHitehall 6-5600 NO PHONE ORDERS O
VISIT OUR BUDGET SHOP FOR OTHER SPECIAtS O
GARDEN CLUB
ACTIVITIES
SILVER SPRING GARDEN CLUB.
Monday, 8 p.m.. Park and Planning
Commission Building, 8787 Georgia
Bilver Spring. Md. Talk by
William O. Douglas. Associate Justice
of the Supreme Court. "The C&O
Canal—lts Recreational Value—And
the Potomac Valley." The club Execu
tive Committee has opposed the loss
of the recreational area that would
result with the building of the pro
posed River Bend Dam.
. TAKOMA PARK WOMEN'S CLUB.
Garden Department. Monday. 12 noon.
Jessup Blair Community House. Talk.
"Introduction to Spring," with color
’Hdes. by Charles N. Thomsen.
LITTLE FARMS GARDEN CLUB OF
POTOMAC. Monday, home of Mrs.
Sterling Maddox; co-hostesses. Mrs.
John Keppler and Mrs. Frederick
Hjertberg. Talk. "Science in the Gar
den." Dr. Conrad B. Link. Annual
meeting and election.
NEIGHBORHOOD GARDEN CLUB.
Monday, 8 p m.. St. George's Episcopal
Church. North Nelson at Fairfax drive.
Arlington. Va. Talk. "Camellias and
Unusual Shrubs." Jerry Hill.
WOODLANDS GARDEN CLUB of i
Fairfax. Monday. American Red Cross
Building. Fairfax. Va. Roger Black
from Sleepy Hollow will speak and
demonstrate flower arrangements fol
lowed by a workshop. Bring bowl and
holders.
. _ terrace garden club.
Monday. 8 p.m.. home of Mrs. Tercssa
Tavenner. 1935 Hawthorne ave. Teacup
flower arrangements.
GLENCARLYN GARDEN CLUB. Mon
r.uy' »? John’s Episcooal
Church. Fifth and Lexington ata. south.
Arlington. Wilbur H. Youngman, 'gar
of. Th?, Star, guest sneaker.
Mrs. Milton Arnold has succeeded Mrs.
Terence G. Hallinan as president.
STM°RELAND HILLS GARDEN
CLUB, Monday. 10 am., home of Mrs.
Peter Murphy. 5300 Boxwood ct Pro
gram: "Gardening Hints.”
BROOKLAND GARDEN WORKSHOP.
Monday, 8 p.m.. home of Mrs. Maudes’.
Wright. 3114 Warder st. n.w.
°TpN ROSE GARDEN FOUN-
P A JI°N. Monday. 8 p.m.. Broyhill
Auditorium. 4800 Lee hwy.. Arlington.
Va. George McCauley will demonstrate
rose pruning and show slides Mrs
Fred Caudle will speak on fertilizers
and mulches. Public invited.
.. VI J ENNA „ WOOD GARDEN CLUB.
Monday, 8 p.m., Vienna Presbyterian
£ hu . r i? h W i,. B Hl “ s ' Past president.
Northern Virginia Nurserymen’s As
sociation. will speak on "Lawn Con
ditioning." Husbands of members in
vited Hostesses: Margaret Stadler,
Sue Bass. Dorothy Fitzgerald. ,
LINCOLNIA HILLS GARDEN CLUB
of Alexandria. Va.. Tuesday. 8 p m..
Hospitality room. Coca-Cola Bottling I
■co.. 0401 Seminary rd. Hostesses;
Mrs. R. E. Compton and Mrs. R. K.
Ander.
■ COUNTRYSIDE GARDEN CLUB of
I County, Tuesday noon, home
i°* “I®- W. A Stenhouse. Dunn Loring
SS^aP unn Lorln «’ Va. Closed meeting.
Election.
GLENWOOD ROAD GARDEN CLUB,
Tuesday, 8:15 p.m.. home of Mrs. S. J.
Weioenkopt. 5506 Glenwood road. "In
terior Decor From Dried Materials,"
program by Mrs. C. Odell Cremeans
and committee. Demonstration of con
struction of wall plaques. Workshop.
LANGLEY GARDEN CLUB. Tuesday,
1 p.m., home of Mrs. F. F. Adams.
3102 Lucy lane. McLean. Va.
BURLEITH GARDEN CLUB. Tues
day. 8 p.m., home of Mrs. Ruth Car
penter. 1600 Thirty-seventh street N.W.
Demonstration of flower arrangements
iby members.
I WOODRIDGE GREEN THUMBS
GARDEN CLUB. Tuesday, 8 p.m.. home
of Mra. Edna Gasperettl. 1903 Kearny
street N.E.
POTOMAC VALLEY GARDEN CLUB.
Tuesday. 8 p.m., home of Mrs. Harry
A Early. 3408 Camfield drive: co
hostess Mrs. Paul A. Giblin. Talk bv
Mrs. James Griswold. "Japanese Flower
Arrangements."
; HOMESTEADERS GARDEN CLUB.
Wednesday. 10 a.m.. home of Mrs. ;
James W. Qulggle. 4949 Hillbrook lane.
Workshop for club flower show with
Mrs. Douglas Paiteson-Knight as guest
auviser
. NEIGHBORS INC. GARDEN CLUB.
Wednesday. 8 p.m.. home of Mrs. Alda
Diggs, 5922 Second street N.W. Topic:
"Planting Seeds for Annual Flowers." :
POTOMAC CHRYSANTHEMUM
SOCIETY, Wednesday, 8 p.m.. Per
petual Building, 9401 Wisconsin ave
nue. Bethesda. W. H. Youngman will
■ speak on "Soils and Soil Preparation."
JS.'J.’JHERSBI’RG - WASHINGTON
GROVE NEIGHBORHOOD GARDEN
CLUB. Wednesday, 12:30 p.m , Owen
Hall. Grace Methodist Church.
POTOMAC ROSE SOCIETY. Thurs
day. 8 p.m , auditorium. Natural His
tory Building. Tenth street and Con-;
stltution avenue N.W. "Rose Problems
and Their Control." by Dr. J. B. Wil- I
son. botany department. University of
Maryland. Reservations are being
taken for the annual PRS din
ner April 25 at Westmoreland Con
gregational Church. Guest speaker I
win be George Hart of Conrad-Pyle
Co., growers of Star Roses. Topic:
"Prevention. Key to Successful Rose
Gar%ming." PRB sales stations will,
open March 17 at 4719 Brandywine
street N.W.. and 505 Sligo avenue. Sil
ver Spring. Md. Society members
should learn restricted hours ct serv
ice. Soring bus tours are set for
Arboretum-Sherwood Garden. April 28: i
fji Pont Winterthur Museum. May 19:
Hershey Hotel Rose Garden. June 9:
others to be announced. The March
■ Newsletter lists 16 new members.
1 DOGWOOD HILLS GARDEN CLUB.
Thursday. 8 p.m., home of Mr. and
Mrs. John Marek. Oak Hilf drive. An
nandale. Va. Talk, "What to Expect
of a Progressive Garden Club." Mrs
Joseph W. Crain of NCGC League
Horticulture: Forced branches Ari
rangement of the month: "Breath of
.jp*-
PLEASANT PLAINS FLOWER GAR
| DEN CLUB. Thursday, 7:45 p.m.. home
Holly Fruiting
Is Complex
Question
By BILL YOUNGMAN
Star Garden Editor
The question as to whether
or not two hollies must be
present In order to have a
berry display is a commonly
asked question. Every gardener
with a holly tree or bush is
interested in the wintertime
display of berries. And, the
answer could very well be no
Actually, the Burford variety
Os the Chinese holly and one
or two varieties of the English
holly will produce some fruit
without a male plant being
present. Also, the Burford va
riety is the only holly on which
fruiting can be stimulated
through the use of a fruiting
hormone.
Fruiting .on all others is ac
complished by having both the
male and female plants of the
same species nearby.
The distance apart varies
somewhat, but usually, since
they flower rather early in the
spring when bees are interested
in their pollen, they may be
a hundred yards apart. Closer
spacing is preferable for an
abundant display of fruit.
Some Indifferent
Most gardeners using the
Japanese hollies are not es
pecially interested in the fruits
and make no effort to have
both male and female present.
This may change since some
of the holly breeders are work
ing to produce red fruited
Japanese hollies. The black
fruits are small and Incon
spicuous and the Japanese
hollies are grown for their
form and foliage.
One male plant provides all
of the pollen necessary for a
dozen or more female plants.
Normally the male plant pro
duces abundant bloom, where
as the berry-bearing females
produce a much more moderate
sized crop of flowers.
Sometimes the location of
the male plant may be such
that it flowers earlier or later
than the females and thus its
pollen is not available at the
time the female flowers are re
ceptive. Sometimes this may be
counteracted by moving the
male tree, usually a careful
study of the situation is neces
sary in order to solve the
problem.
If space does not permit
having both male and female
plants in the yard, it may be
necessary to obtain a flowering
branch elsewhere and place it
in a bottle of water hanging
in the female tree. Fruiting
can and often is produced]
by this method.
Frosts Kill Bloom
Another method Is to graft
a male branch onto the female.
1 This can be done on the “back
iside” and will not greatly de
of Mrs. Alrena V. Quarles, 422 Lurav
place N.W. Instructions by Hazard W.
Jones.
BURNING TREE GARDEN CLUB.
Thursday, 10:30 am., home of Mrs.
| John Bozevich. €BIO Hillmead road.
(Bethesda A auest speaker will ais
cuss azaleas.
£ 8
CAMELLIAS |
V - f
ONE TO & FEET— $2’95 up
& Many with flower buds—ready to bloom in a few weeks. ;5
We have several thousand camellia plants to choose from <5
*• that have been grown in our nursery with no winter protec- St
Si tion other than light shade. S
1;
5; Also Daphne Heather in bloom Hybrid Rhododendron— <
Hammamelis Mollis in bloom—Creeping and Dwarf Azaleas,
f* heavily budded. ALL PLANTS GUARANTEED TO GROW. '?
j’ 1 Better See Our Stock Before You Plant Anything ,'ij
t HILL NURSERY j
’5
& CAMELLIA GARDENS *
* 1722 NORTH GLEBE ROAD, ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA
Between Wash. Blvd, and Lee Hwy.
f:; JACKSON 7-3472 |
THIS
WEEK's specials
Where You Get That Information
AZALEAS 2Y AR OLD Lj
$ 1” per doz.
SILVER MAPLE <>b »u
’5” (““) 2 <• *10”
for immediate ehade
TANBARK ,
2 cu. ft. bag only $129 n
Univ, of Maryland recommended
GRASS SEED—SUN AND SHADE
lb s.s3.Bs||-- 1b V53.60 ,
WITH VITOGRO 3,000
CUT JONQUILS 39c, 3DO, q.oo (
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OPEN DAILY AND SUNDAYS 9 TO 6
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LANDSCAPE NURStRYMIN
5950 AGER ROAD, HYATTSVILLE, MD.
GARDEN CHORES . . .
March 18
Wait until the soil is dry enough before trans
planting or sowing seed. . . . Apply a high nitrogen
fertilizer to the lawn unless diseases are present. . . .
Apply a pre-emergence crab grass killer to the lawn
where crab grass has been a problem, but not where
permanent grass seed has been sown recently. . . . Finish
the pruning of trees, shrubs and roses, the latter can wait
until later in the suburbs. . . . The spring planting of
trees, shrubs and roses can be done whenever the soil
is dry enough. . . . Mound newly planted roses to a
height of 6 to 10 inches with soil, peatmoss, sawdust
or any materials that will protect the canes from the
sun and wind. . . .
Apply pulverized limestone to lawn and garden
where needed to correct the soil acidity. . . . Transplant
seedlings from the seed-starting medium to a prepared
soil mixture as soon as the first pair of true leaves
appear. ... If grass seed is to be planted this spring
it should be done now. . . .
Spray to control wild garlic and chickweed, 2,4-D
is effective on controlling the wild garlic, Sllvex for the
chickweed. . . . Remove mulches from the bulb and
perennial beds but keep close by should freezing weather
threaten; remove on a cloudy day if the new growth is
yellow. . . . Repair the snow damage to trees and shrubs.
—W. H. Y.
tract from the appearance of
the female tree.
The fruiting of holly trees is
often spoiled by late spring
frosts which kill the blooms.
This cannot be determined
with certainty except by noting
whether both male and female
trees are present. This can be
determined only when the trees
are in bloom. A male flower
has prominent stamens and a
rudimentary pistil. The female
flower has a prominent pistil
and rudimentary stamens. The
flowers are small but these
characteristics can easily be
seen with the naked eye.
With both male and female
trees being reasonably close to
gether, the cause of the lack of
fruit may be determined by a
study of other factors. The
frost injury mentioned above
as well as the flowering period
being influenced by location
are two of the most common
causes.
Insect and disease injury can
so weaken a holly that it will
not be productive Rntil pro
tected. Undoubtedly there are
other causes for non-fruiting
but these are the more com
mon ones.
When to Prune?
Pruning can affect the berry
production. The flowers of the
American (Ilex opaca) and the
Japanese (I. crenata) hollies
appear on the new growth. On
the Cinese and English hollies
the flowers are borne on last
year’s growth. Thus in pruning
the American holly it can and
should be done early—before
new shoots appear. Whereas
the pruning of the Chinese and
■English hollies should be done
I by mid-summer so that the new
1 growth that appears in the fall
and which will have the berries
will be intact at flowering time.
The midwinter pruning which
is recommended for the Ameri
can holly might well be mod
ified for the Chinese and Eng
lish. Undoubtedly many will
want to cut sprigs from the
latter two and if they are re
moved from the less conspicu
ous places the berry display
I may still be had. W. H. Y.
Gardens Course
Being Planned by
Prince Georges
A four-session course for all
persons interested in gardening
is planned by the Prince
Georges County Extension Serv
ice at Carrollton Elementary
School. Registration is required,
through the County Extension
Office, Courthouse, Upper Marl
boro, Md., and free tickets
will be forwarded.
Following is the schedule, all
meetings at 8:15 p.m.
Match 26—" Care and Establishment ,
of Lawns.” Cavton C. Werner, assistant
county agent: "Disease Problems of
Purl and Their Control." Dr. Jack
Wilson, plant pathologist University ot'
Maryland.
-" Bel , e , ct ' on and Use of Better
Plants for the Home Grounds." Wilbur
Star Y ° UI ” n ’* n ' gsrtlen edltor of The
„ April 9—" The Outdoor Living
Room." Carl Johnson. L.A.. Horticulture
Department. University of Maryland.
lfi 7~ , " d Management of
Shrubs and Shade Trees." with panel
discussion by county agents, specialists
and nurserymen: Dr. Jack Wilson. Ted j
Bissell. Plant pathologist. Maryland
University: Dr. William Kosar. United
States Arboretum: Fred Schneider.
Schneider Garden Center, and Clayton
C. Werner, moderator.
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LI. 3-8151
1317 Half Street, S.E., Metropolitan Washington
In Glen Bdrnie Area call Southfield 1-0190
NO DOWN PAYMENT > 36 MONTHS TO PAY • FIRST PAYMENT SEPTEMBER
a gardener who wants to do
ga gK things the right way and avoid costly
If you are a gardener who wants to be
sure you get specific plant varieties at the
time you want and need them . . .
Y ou are a 9 ar d ener doesn't want
to ,^ e burdened with "bargain" plants
which do not produce results ... •
Ift you are a gardener who wants a pro
fessional analysis of your progress and
goals ...
■ Then you will find
everything you need
and want from those
who are trained and
experienced in this
field, the members of
the Northern Virginia
Nurserymen's Associ
ation, who are pledged
to the highest stand
ards of quality, service
jl ethics.
Ic u l
Brown's Garden Center Westcott Nursery Co. Is NVINI -I
Rte. 30, Chantilly, Vo. Falls Church, Vo. \«»
327-6355 Box 331. JE. 2-1990 \% OU*UTfIsERVIJE
Vadma Nursery Agency, Inc. Fouse and Bild •
Fairfax, Va. 201 Arlington Blvd. **
Box 1020. JE. 2-1132 Foils Church, Va.
JE- 4-0646 We invite you to join garden-
Campbell-Ferrara Nurseries ,n 9 hands with US —by tele-
7804 Duke Street Northern Virginia Nursery 1 phone Or personal visit—in a
A 'H° n^s V ” | combined effort to make your
grounds a place of functional,
Hill's Nusery and Camellia Gardens living beauty.
1722 N. Glebe Road, > ” ’Mon, Va. JA. 7-3472 &
Pruning
The pruning of trees and
shrubs should be done whenever
the weather permits. Be sure to
paint all wounds with a good
tree dressing to prevent the
entry of wood-rotting fungi.
For Finest Quality Always—Buy Plants
With The Ingleside Plantation Quality Seal,
They are locally grown especially for Hie 4 wr/A
Washington Area! They readily trans- Ly
plant and immediately begin to grow ISi Iql
vigorously in your garden.
This Is Your Seal of Quality
BALLED & BURLAPPFD, QUALITY LABELED, ACCLIMATED PLANTS
VIRGINIA’S FINEST NURSERY oak grove
OVER 1,000 ACRES
Behnke’s Giant Pansies
Field-Grown Blooming Clumps
Doz.—Sl.Bs; 25—53.50; 36—55.00; 50—56.75; 100—513.25
BIG, liusky rltimpa! We hope the weather
«• 111 hje nice enough for digging. z
Rose Bushes
Tou can be sure of o better deal in our Rosei. They are all guaranteed
No 1 Stock potted in STERILIZED, WEED and FUNGUS-FREE SOIL. That
is important! In our extra large selection of the finest, newest ond best
standard kinds, you will find ALL THE 1961 A.R.S. WINNERS as well as
the Top Introductions of 1962.
Each 82.25 to 83.50
1070 Discount on 6 —15% on 12 or moro Roses
Os course, WE POT ONLY No. 1 Roses. If you want to see what a No. 1
Rose Bush should look like (if you are in doubt about getting No. Fs
while paying the price for No. 1) come out and SEE OURSI
Behnke’s African Violets
The Show of Shows—Second to None
For Violet Lovers Everywhere
SPECIAL Sinj|e phnu
750 each
Our Specials Are Famous for Vigorous, Top Quality Plants
All are 3-inch hudtied or blooming plants—not
to be confused with barely started 2i/ a " stock.
/ / AFRA SOIL
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tLw Kg Pre ferret by Thourande
5 lbs. 65c; 10 lbs. $1.25
JI J NURSERIES 11300 Wash.-Bolto. Blvd.
Beltsville, Md.
Open Daily and Sundays 9:00 A.M. To 5:30 P.M.
ALL FENCES
12th St. & Brentwood Rd. N.E.
BERRALL JASPER FENCE CO.
Phone 529-7300

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