OCR Interpretation


The day book. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, February 09, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-02-09/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

mS$
v -9 to - tjs vj - &.rvv '
' 'rs? V"
v-
fc
THE DAY BOOR
500 SO. PEORIA 3T. 398 TEL. MONROE 353
Vol. 1, No. 116 Chicago, Friday, Feb. 9, 191 One Cent
k
CAR MEN SAY THEY FIGHT
THE PEOPLE'S BATTLE
Following a conference be
tween President, Roach of the
Chicago Railways Co. and a com
mittee representing the car men
on the North and West sides, a
peaceable adjustment of the diffi
culties that threatened to result
in a strike appeared probable.
President Roach gave it out
that the negotiations had pro
gressed favorably, and a further
conference would be held tomor
row. He declined to say whether
the discharge of Supt. Hogarth
' was demanded by the men as pre
liminary to a settlement. The
committee of employes made no
statement.
The alleged unfair actions of
Hogarth are the main grievance
of the employes. It is charged he
has reduced the number of cars,
and also cut down the running
time, making it practically im
possible for the crews to make
time. The men say that when
they are late on these unfair
schedules they are fined or sus
pended, and the punishment for
minor offenses is too severe.
'We'll stand pat," said William
Ouinn, president of the local car
men's organization, before going
into the conference. "We are in
the right, and our grievances are
greater than tKe public realizes.
If the people were familiar with
the question theywould not
blame us. It is not our fault that
there are not enough cars, and we
are really fighting the public's
battle."
Supt. James B. Hogarth said
this morning he would stand by
all of his acts, and would not re
sign. He declared there had never
been a man fired who did not de
serve it. President Roach said he
did not have the power to dis
charge Hogarth, and this action
would be up to the board of di-'
rectors.
COP SLIPS ONE OVER ON
THE BRIDGE TRUST '
New York, Feb. 9. There was
much chuckling in the supreme
court here today as the story of
how "Paddy" Ryan, plain, unlet
tered policeman, of Youngstown,
O., beat the bridge trust, built the'
Manhattan bridge, saved the city
$800,000, and made 2,000,000
himself, was unfp)ded,
The story -t;ame out in the suit
of Cornelius J'. Sullivan, relative
of "Big Tim," against Ryan. Cor
nelius had been Ryan's partner
in the deal, an& Ryan had heat
him out of bis-'sKre of the profits,
too. V
The specifications for the
bridge were carried out along the
"eye bar" method at first. The
sjsfegagjfg
....

xml | txt