OCR Interpretation


The day book. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, June 01, 1912, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1912-06-01/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE KUPPENHEIMER
STRIKE
Representatives of 500 striking
' cutters and trimmers yesterday
attempted a conference with man
agers of ther Kuppenheimer Cloth
ing Co. to present grievances.
Harry Wolf, manager of the
factory, too busy to see them.
Albert Kuppenheimer -was not
too busy, but refused to meet the.
strikers.
The principal grievance of the
cutters and trimmers is that they
' were forced in many cases to eat
their lunches inside the water
closets. '
They also ask a minimum wage
of $8 for cutters and trimmers,
and-a maximum of $24 for cutter
and $18 for trimmers ; recognition
of the union, and an arbitration
agreement, with the ultimate ar
rangement of an agreement simi
lar to that in force in the tiart,
Schaffner & Marx shops.
For work which cutters in
other shops are paid $24- a week,
those employed by Kuppenheim
er were receiving from $10 to $11.
Kuppenheimer refused to dis
cuss grievances even the one re
lating to the eating of lunches in
the toilets. It is probable that
this practice, a direct violation'of
the factory laws, will be brought
ta the notice of the state factory
inspector and the health authori
ties. So far only the 500 cutters and
trimmers have been called out in
the Kuppenheimer shops. This
afternoon at Wicker Park hall,
and tomorrow t Zimas hall,
mass meetings of the other trades
of the garment workers will bt
held, and a strike vote will be
taken' Over 4,000 - employes,
mostly women, will be affected if
a walk .out fs ordered!
CHICAGO ARCHITECT
- DEAD f
D. H. Burnham, noted Chicago
architect, died at Heidelburg,
Germany," - flits ' morning1 r accord
ing to a taclegTamlreceivedat his
office fri this" city. " -r
He'wfiotdesigne'd the? Masonic
Temple," .the "Chicago 'World's
Fair buildings and- Marshall
Field's ,s tote. N ' T' '
Mr- 3urnham ws- on-a trip
around the 'world withjhis' wifet
son ancLdaughter.- Jwas" born
in Henderson, Ky., 64 yeas ago,
and came' to Chicago "when he
was ten years old.
: o-o il
PASSING IT A0$IG.
"You gotta quit throwing trash
over into my yard !"
"That "wasn't -any ' trash I
throwecLv into your yard, neither.
It was trash what was throwed
into my yard from the next yard,"
.

xml | txt