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The day book. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, August 16, 1913, LAST EDITION, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-08-16/ed-2/seq-1/

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LAST EDITION LAST EDITION
THE WHISPER-A SHORT LOVE STORY BY ROBT
W. CHAMBERS APPEARS IN THIS ISSUE
THE DAY BOOK
An Adless Daily Newspaper.
N.J). Cochran, sP&s 500 South Peoria St.
Editor and Publisher,
Tel. Monroe 353.
VOL. 2, NO. 273 Chicago, Saturday, Aug. 16, 1913
ONE CENT
HEARST WILL GO ON FRYING PAN OF
CHICAGO FEDERATION OF LABOR .
Trades Union Edition of Examiner Expected To Be V
- Denounced by Delegates Representing All .
.' '. - - 1
Union Labor in Chicago. . ....
Tomorrow's meeting of the Chicago Federation of Labor wiU-gSBably,
be one of the most important meetings that body ever held.
From many unions from alT over. Chicago delegates will come to repre
sent the, sentiment of those unions against the deal .between Hearst and
Simon O'Donnell, president of the Chicago Building Trades Council, to get
out an alleged trades union edition of the Chicago Examiner.
Aside from a few close supporters of O'Donnell, the sentiment of or
ganized labor in Chicago is practically unanimous against a trades union
edition of a newspaper that is on the unfair list of the Chicago Federation
of Labor and is barred from using the union label of the Chicago Allied
Printing Trades Council. '
While unions in various trades all over town have denounced the
Hearst-O'Donnell deal, the feeling is strongest among the real union men
in the unions affiliated with the Building Trades Council, because of the
non-union position they are put In by the action of theto council president.
The C. F. of L, put the Hearst papers on the unfair list last year after
a thorough investigation by a special committee and after th'e 'publishers
had turned down all efforts of President John Fitzpatrick to bring about
arbitration.
The Hearst papers started the lockout on May 1, 1912, by locking out
their union prjessmen, members of Pressmen's Union No. 7, and filling their
places with scabs.

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