OCR Interpretation


The day book. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, September 11, 1913, Image 24

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-09-11/ed-1/seq-24/

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oilskins and take electric light globes
and examine every inch where other
men can go.
The owners of the ships are doing
all thtey can to stamptut the traffic,
but it's a hard matter, because petty
officers often connive with the sailors
and get their percentage for helping.
And government employes earning
$3 a day are often offered large
bribes.
It's a pretty lucrative business, too.
The Chinese sailor pays about $9 for
a tin box of "hop" weighing a third
of a pound. He pays $5 more to get
it smuggled over from China. In the
United States he may sell it for any
sum from $25 to $50.
The government has had much
trouble, too, in trying to prevent
opium smuggling across the north
ern and southern borders. From
Mexico the stuff reached Laredo, El
Paso and Calexico by trains, auto
mobiles and runners. Once it gets
aboard a Pullman car, it is especially
hard to discover. It is frequently hid
den by Pullman porters, who know
many secret places for keeping it.
On our northern border we have
been more successful. The Canadian
authorities are co-operating with us,
as the Mexican officials will not do,
and are also keeping close watch on
ports. The Japanese lines of steam
ers are also fighting it
Conditions have improved much
from the days when sailors used to
throw the opium overboard, attached
to floats, as the ships came in, and
leave it for their confederates to pick
up. The government cutters and
launches put an end to that practice.
But there is still need of great vigil
ance and of new laws to do away
with the present loopholes.
OPIUM HABIT WRECKS WHITE
MEN AND WOMEN
By William Hanna Thomson, M. D.,
Ex-President New York Academy
of Medicine.
The 'American "opium fiend" sel
dom smokes opium.
A white- jopium user may start by
taking laudanum as medicine. As the
habit grows on him he increases the
dose until at last he can swallow it
as a drink.
Under its influence not only is pain
deadened, but a sense of intense in
terest is awakened in him. Every
concern in his life is displaced for
the time by that interest.
A crowd of thoughts arrive, bring
ing a succession of splendid ideas,
and up he ascends, as if to take a
seat on a cloud where he can serene
ly look down on this poor mundane
sphere, feeling himself quite above
its'fussy littleness. , N
. After the effect has passed off it
is succeeded by a sense of horrible
vacancy, which causes a restlessness
that nothing can relieve but more
laudanum,! or by opium itself, in the
form of pills, instead of its laudanum
extract.
toes this. baleful agent injure his
body? Not' much. Nor does it per
ceptibly injure the mind, for many
of these poor creatures can talk
beautifully and write elegantly. But
in them the-Will can no longer rule.
That is why the man is ruined. The
drug has dethroned his will; and
when the wills falls everything good
in the man goes down with it.
LEGAL TALENT
"Yes, I went to two lawyers and
got their opinions."
"And.what were they?"
"Ten dollars-each."
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