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The day book. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, September 11, 1913, Image 25

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1913-09-11/ed-1/seq-25/

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ENGLISH LABOR LEADER MANN
TO SPEAK HERE TONIGHT
Chicago admirers of Tom Mann,
the famous English labor leader, will
have a-chance to hear him speak to
night Under the auspices of the Organ
ized Labor League, he will address
a meeting at the North Side Turner
Hall, 824 N. Clark street.
Mann's life has been an eventful
one. He is a member of the English
Amalgamated Society of Engineers
(Machinists) and played a prominent
part in the London dock strike in
1889. This was the time when the
."Dockers' tanner" was obtained, and
the organization of the longshore
men first took place.
He was also a member of the Royaf
Commission, appointed by the En
glish government to inquire into the
causes of labor disputes and their
remedy. A '
He was the first president of the
International Transport Workers'
Federation, the headquarters of
which is now in Germany.
But Mann had a great struggle in
obtaining a foothold in Germany. Be
fore it was finally achieved he was
arrested and expelled in 1895. lie
had the same experience the next
year.
- He later made-an organizing tour
through the Scandinavian countries",
followed.by -eight years 'in Australia,
New Zealand and South Africa,
j White in 'Australia he- was impris
oned for five weeks on a charge of
obstructing.the street-""He was con
nected 'with an extensive Btrike in
New South Wales,' when the silver
miners resisted a cut in' wages. He
was tried for sedition anif conspiracy,
and, after a long and bitter trial was
acquitted. "
On his return to England in 1910
he at once went to work on an or
ganized campaign to bring about in
dustrial solidarity. This led to the
creat transport workers strike of
ryzed by a strike of 759,000 men
Mann was the most important figun
in this strike.
In 1912 the big strike of coal mh
ers was o'n in Great Britain. Mann
on the strength of his experience
urged the soldiers not to shoot i
they were called out. For this EttB
advice "he was sentenced to sh
months in prison, but was released
after serving two months. Last wee
he made a similar speech in th-,
strike-bound district of Cahnuel)
Mich.
He is vnow touring America.
o o
MAN HAS NARROW ESCAPE Oil
BURNING YACHT
Unidentified man was; nearly burn
ed to death when a $15,000 gasohm
cruiser exploded and was destroyei
in the north branch", of the river at
Rockwell street.
The launch was owned by James
D. Lacey, 1254 Lincoln parkway,
wealthy. land dealer. Recently h
hired a man, whose name he does no(
know, to attend it while it lay in docl
at Rockwell street.
This morning he was seen to board
the launch. An explosion occurred
The man rusned to the deck, hit
clothing aflame, and leaped into th
river." He later swam -to shore, ani
was carried away by a man passirij
In an automobile. The police havt
been unable to learn where he wai
taken. '
o o
JUDGE SAYS HE QUIT TO AVOID
NOTORIETY
Pontjac, III., Sept. 11. Judge Ru&
sell, who resigned as superintendeni -of
reformatorywhlle charges of cru
elty to inmates and mismanagement
were pending against the institution,
declared today that he quit to save
the reformatory from objectionable
notoriety based on "trumped-up"
charges. He charges that political
pressure was brought to bear upon
the board of managers to force his
removal and denies that inmates have.
been! mistreated. . M
..1
w.
3J)U,.-saen. $ransOrtatkuLas-para--l

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