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The day book. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, March 11, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-03-11/ed-2/seq-8/

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ROBERT McCORMICK WEDS MRS. AMY ADAMS
IN LONDON AS SOCIETY EXPECTED
"I told you so," said Chicago soci
ety "with a wink when the news came
yesterday that Rob't McConnick,
owner of the" Trib, and Mrs. Amie
Adams, both of this city, had mar
ried in London.
When McConnick started "on his
way to Russia as a war correspon
dent," and when Mrs, Adams arrived
in England last Saturday, friends
knew what was up. The pair were
joined in the "registry office of St
George's, Hanover square.
The wedding came just within the
requirements of the Illinois law,
which prohibits marriage within a
year after divorce. Mrs. Adams was
divorced on March 6, 1914.
The marriage seems to be a key
to all of the troubles between Edward
S. Adams, former husband of the
bride and cousin of McConnick, and
the Trib owner.
Adams, who is a broker, according
to a bill filed, kept McCormick as a
guest in his Lake Forest home for
about ten years, "during which time
McCormick didn't pay a cent of
board."
For reasons which were not known
until later, Adams and McCormick
split and the owner of the Trib
changed his residence abruptly.
Soon after, Mrs. Adams filed a suit
for divorce which, according to
Adams was uncontested because of
an agreement with her. Mrs. Adams
received her decree on March 6 of
last year.
The cousins again started scrap
ping and the swell society bunch at
Lake Forest were surprised when
Adams filed a suit for $300,000
against McConnick, cahrging aliena
tion of the affections of his wife.
McCormick came back at his broker-cousin
by bankruptcy proceed
ings, claiming that Adams had bor
rowed $40,000. His claim was up
held by Judge Landis and the case is
now pending.
Somehow, the Trib society editor
must have slipped a cog, tor although
the Examiner and Herald each car
ried a short story about the wedding',
nothing appeared in the Trib.
A MILK CASE TIT FOR TAT
New York, March 11. Suing the
Erie railroad for $32,000 for a colli
sion with his milk wagon, Frank Wil
kinson faces a $1,000 counter claim
for "bruising and destroying polish"
of the engine's cowcatcher.
THEN THE HAIRPULLING
"What do you think! Jessie de
Swelle gave a party and didn't invite
me."
"Well, she's noted for having such
select crowds."
o o
When one sees one of the most no
torious of grafting politicians wear
ing a button reading "My country,
right or wrong"' one has to do some
thinking.
JM
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