OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, November 16, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-11-16/ed-1/seq-5/

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"GIVE FATHERS FAIR WAGE TO
HELP CHILDREN," SAYS O'HARA
Champaign, III., Nov. 16. Lieut
Qpv. Barratt 0?Hara, principal
speaker at this afternoon's session
of the Illinois State Federation of
b Women's Clubs, threw a bomb
among the large audience of fashionably-gowned
women that had gath
ered to discuss child labor when he
declared that the women were wast
ing their time in devising ways of
protecting children.
"JThe way to protect the child,"
said O'Hara, "is to provide the father
with a fair wage. Parents are not
greedy. Give them wages big enough
to support homes and the children
won't be sent out to wear out their
little "bodies under the stress of hard
toiL" ' j
Here are a few of the things the
lieutenant governor told the club
women: "If the girl in the factory, under
the heartless piece system that
' spurs her to exertions past the dan
ger point, thus impairs her nervous
system, the penalty will not only be
taken from her, but from her chil
dren and her children's children, in
the generations that follow.
"If the girl in. the department store,
inadequately . pai insufficiently
clothed, with litQe opportunity of
wholesome recreation, becomes ner
vous and dwarfed, society in the next
generation will p'ay the penalty for
the error committed by society in
this generation.
"Boys and girls from your fam
ilies will reach the approximate level
. of all other boys and girls in your
f community. A mother has only half
done her duty when she accords to
her own children that instruction
and those opportunities that she
deems well for them to possess. She
must go further, even to the extent
of according to the limit of her abil
ity the same instruction and the
same opportunities to all pther boys
nd girls,..
"Shame on us if, as the citizens of
a great and prosperous common
wealth, we should much longer per
mit our girls, the mothers of the
children of tomorrow, to seek em
ployment, the recipient of any wage
that a strong employer may in his
sense of 'charity' deem well to give
themancL embracing that exploy
ment, pass their days and nights in
privation, heroically striving to exist
honorably upon that which is insuffi
cient for normal existence.
"The girl who is making the strug
gle against odds is someone else's
daughter today. But wealth does
have wings, and tomorrow she may
be your daughter. Hadn't you bet
ter do something about it today?"
o o
CAVALRYMEN-CITIZEN FEUD IS
HOT AT HIGHLAND PARK
The feud between the citizens of
Highland Park and the First cavalry,
encamped at Fort Sheridan, grew
more bitter when the unidentified
man assaulted by the soldiers dieJ
yesterday. Militiamen were not allowed-to
get off the electric cars in
the town; citizens were said to be
talking vengeance.
Trouble began .when a soldier was
attacked as he came home with a
Highland Park girl after a dance. He
was beaten and his uniform torn off.
The next night a group of cavalry
men, armed with clubs, went to town.
They stopped a fellow on the street
and beat him unconscious before
they found he was the wrong party.
o o
TEDDY AND TAFT STILL ONLY
MEMBERS OF THIS CLUB
Cleveland, Nov. 16. An attempt to
increase the membership of the "ex
president's club of America" met
with failure, according to Wm. How
ard Taft, member in good standing.
"The two living members hadn't
been able to agree on much for some
years," said Taft "They met last
summer and agreed, however, to
have another member. They failed.
. He is still on the waitine list."

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