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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, April 14, 1917, LAST EDITION, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1917-04-14/ed-2/seq-4/

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HAIG HASN'T STOPPED YET
NOW AFTER ST. QUENTIN
London, April 14. Suddenly
switching point of his drive from
around Arras, Field Marshal Haig
last "night smashed his men forward
far to south around St Quentin and
advanced to Fayet, within two miles
of the city.
Fayet, northwest of St. Quentin,
was carried during night; also im
portant positions of Ascension farm
and Grand Priel farm.
With the British Armies Afield.
Lens was menaced today by British
big push.
German resistance was growing
more and more desperate with each
hour that Field Marshal Haig shoved
his men forward. But resistance
was ineffective for" powerful British
blows.
Today Vimy ridge was still shelled
fr6m afar off by German guns, as
well as other positions held by the
British. But everywhere the Teu
tonic artillery was shooting excited
ly rather than methodically. It was
erratic, not accurate.
British forces were steadily gain
ing command of all high ground, vil
lages and other vantage points as
they progressed astride the Hinden
burg line. Today even the spreading
plain below Vimy ridge, from which
Lens was directly menaced, was be
ing abosrbed.
Canadians continued irresistibly
pressing on down Vimy slopes, oc
cupying Petit Vimy, Givenchy and
Bailleul railway station.
"We've got Fritz where we want
him now," observed one Canadian of
ficer grimly today.
With the British Armies Afield.
Lens must fall soon to Canadians.
British forces are slowly but stead
ily closing in around France's great
mining capital. Canadians were
hurling themselves from Vimy
heights on German troops staggering
back across the plain
Paris. Bombardment of German
positions south. -of St Quentin, was.
T continued all through last night by
French artillery. In the Champagne
artillery on both sides was partic
ularly active, where reconnoitering
French detachments brought in pris
oners from German lines.
WAR BRIEFS BY WIRE
Cheyenne. Entire population of
Shannon, Wyo. 30 has offered to
enlist.
London. British food crisis grows
more severe. Especial shortage of
wheat.
London. Fire in Woolwich arse
nal caused no loss of life and, apart
from slight damage to building, no
material loss. v
New York. Gov. Whitman will call
for 50,000 to 100,000 men between
25 and 35 to fill New York's quota of
army of 1,000,000.
Washington. Sec'y refuses to
confirm or deny report that Jas. W.
Gerard, former ambassador to Ger
many, is to be sent as ambassador to
Japan.
Detroit. Business men to donate
$100,000 worth of motor apparatus
to make 31st Michigan inft best
equippedTiational guard regiment in
service. v
N8w York. Union Square, famous
gathering place of .soap box orators,
will be ploughed up and become
flourishing "farm" New York's first
"backyard garden."
Aurora, Mo. Lives of its editors
and destruction of Aurora Daily
Light newspaper plant threatened in
letter believed to have originated in
pro-German circles.
Washington. Schoon'er Edwin R.fl
Hunt of New York was shelled by
submarine April 7 off Cape Cata and
her master, Nicholas Miller, and her
crew of eight were landed there.
New York. Syndicate of bankers
agrees to-loan $20,000,000 to farm
ers at 4y2 per cent to finance plant
ing and harvesting. Money will be
lo&ned.onvunindorsed personal notes
MteMUtfttit

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