OCR Interpretation


The Seattle post-intelligencer. [volume] (Seattle, Wash. Terr. [Wash.]) 1888-1914, November 11, 1888, Image 2

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045604/1888-11-11/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

1
k SUBMARINE STUDY.
Tferilling AiTWrtn* VmifT tfce
He* bv • Dltct.
A Kapart—— •» • * HI "
laf DrMS-TUWaj tfca Wseek
of the Om»».
Srw Y <mk, Oct. ft-*e who dwei 1
upon the dry Und know very little of
the ra<t domain of Septnne that lays
invisible under the rippHng. roiling,
bearing wave* of the deep blue sea.
In those realm* are aceoe*. object* and
living creatures at once queer and in
desciibably attwtire -either for their
vond roa* peculiarities or marvelous
beauty. In this boundless submarine
territory thore are «nbjects of endle*
interest, and it is as yet unexplored,
for none hut professional divers base
been there, and they only to a very
small extent. Oar little knowledge of
what there i« in the and er-ocean world
has to a grea* extent lieen furnished
from »acb wrarce*. Strange to -ay.
there is no record of *och a character
a« an amateur .liver ex<er>t in the
single in-Un-e of Mr. Henry A. War
ren. an English gentleman of large
wealth, advanced education and every
accompli-hinerit available in Kuro
pean universities. Chemistry has
been his particular charm, and eljj
tricitv hi- fascinating hobby. He
is an expert practical elec
trician and has devoted much
time and attention to apparatn
for submarine illumination, one of
the result" of his labor- and re-searche*
is st submarine lamp which can he car
ried in the hand, lowered by a weight.
m attached to a small electrk motor
—of his own invention, can lie sent un
der water, under complete control by
wire- in any direction. Kor lighting
ap the bottom of a river or bay so that
everything .an lie distinguished from
the surface, and for suddenly illumin
ating the water- around t ho-tile war
vessel, and thus insuring the explosion
of a torpedo to destroy the -hip, it U
invaluable
On a recent dark night Mr. Warren
had invited a few friends to witness
some experiments. We went on the
Wall street ferrv wharf at midnight,
the river at that late hour being more
clear of vessels than at any other time.
A slander wire cable had been run
over across to the Brooklyn side and
mjn k to the bottom, attached to it were
70 of the submarine lamps. The elec
tric current was turned on and the ap
paratus began to work. At first, as
we peered over the bulkhead and
strained our eye- in the effort to
nee through the shadow* overhanging
the river we could see a line of tiny
•park* like nee.lie point- tipped with
flame then, as the current was in
creased. these spark* became as large
as walnuts and of a lurid intense
white glow, sparkling, gleaming. Hash
lag almost as a continuous blazing
line, or like a crevice of a volcano in
in its first outbreak in the bed of the
river. The effect was wier.l, spectral
and supernatural in the extreme Just
•t that lime a tug boat. having a ves
sel in tow, came along, and when in
close proximity to the submerged
Maze the pilot was heard to ring hi*
liell signals violently, at the same time
yelling in terror-stricken tones to the
engineer- "Hack her! for heaven's
sake, hack her! The bottom of the
river is split open! Hell has cracked
through* We're all goners—sure!" At
that moment Mr. Warren shut off the
current and the blazing light van
ished, leaving the waters under the
gloomy poll of shadows. Then he
started In- motors with lamp-in two
different directions. They were in-l
vi-ible until fur out, w hen each Mashed
out brilliant gleams that illumin
ated the water for a considera
ble di-tame. Diimfonmled at this dis
play the lite pilot and crew looked
on, speechless and then seemed
to goes- at the notation of the mys
terv. At all events they "made the
welkin ring'' with vigorous and itnpo
lite objurgations. When they rela'ed
their experience to friends, subse
quently, they were credited with hav
ing -uttered from a -pellof "jint jams"
und advised to sign the pledge and
drink no more
There i* much of truth and reason
in the axiom*: "Life is what we make
it;" and "every man makes his own
World." Apt illustration- of thi- are
seen in the method* and habits of life
adopted by gentlemen of wealth and
leisure. In this connection, it may be
appropriate to make mention of the
fa.t that Mr. Warner en lor- the dis
tinction of being, probably, the only
•maUtur submarine explorer in the
world. His initial exj>erien<e as a
diver was in tho pursuance and ad
vancement of his electric theories and
practical mechanical inven'ive enter
prises Frequent and protracted peri
grinations under the billow* inured ami
allured him otiward and forward more
and more, until he wa* devel»|>ed into
a thoroughbred amphibious sport
man, explorer and adventurer En
amored of such adventure, he ha* tra
versed, far and near, the domain of
old Neptune, visited the realm* of the
Na id yueen, "gallanted" her water
nymph*, rtirted with the mermaid*.
Blared at sea verpants, ami tic! levia
thans. and outwitted whale*.
His -]>eedy, trim and staunch steam
yacht, appropriately named "No-id
Queen," is a small floating palace and
lie-ide* it- complete seagoing outfit it
I* supplied with extensive nppnratu
(Or diving, lie is never so contented
as when, clad in diving costume, he
airtk* beneath the -urface to the !*-d of
tlie ocean Ivlow, where he saunter* to
an.l fro. and finding an inexhaustible
field for research ami discovery. One
of hi* fonde-t peculiaritie* i» a' di-po
sltion for vi-iting and exploring sunken
wreck- »f large ocean steamsnins.
In re-poti-e to his invitation I ac
companied him on one of his tour- It
was one of the mildest and loveliest
o>f September day* when we started.
and in a short time located the -pot
where the steamer Scotland went down
in a collision, many >ears ago. in ihe
tinner bay off Governor's island. But
little remains of that once splendid
ocean > r*ft. a- the general government
caused it to l« shattered and removed
by the use of dynamite The few shat
tered -crawnt rib- and ragged inids
ami ends that are visible pre-ent a
doleful. sorr\ appearance.
Then we turned our course south
ward and outward beyond Sandy
llook. out on tlie open «ea. continuing
along the l ong 1 -land shore until we
anchored dim tlv over the wreck of
tbc ill fatol sleati.ship Oregon. On
our v.A aire down Mr W.irreri had pr> -
po-ed iliat I • hould don a diving suit
and accompany him down to the
wreck. With ome reluctance as well
a» ic-giving- I assented and got into
Uie canvas lubbers it Next, thtmen
pi*. Ed the ponderous shoulder piece
and helmet on. and screwed up the
gl««« cas«metit. 1 felt like one im
prisoned in a paten l metallic burial
casiel Ted to the-o!e» of mv feet,
an ! slang scrum my bwk were heavv
balla-tmg weight- of h ad hen thev
belped me ovrr the -ide of the ve<-el 1
felt as cumbrous as some huge, un
gainly rhinoceros or hippopotamus.
That was an uncomfortable feeling
but not anv compar;-on to the -ensa
tio'ij of dread apprehension ami
and doubt win n 1 cropped into th»
water. I'eb' ooch'ao vah -h ' ' I
fairly yelled, as I p!unk*ed beneath the
surface and l>ec .n to descend rapidly.
I yelled and roared, tw ice or tliru-e.
and then realin-l how uselees it was
But I began to ftt - ared. and wishe<t
I had not undertaken it. and
I was wild with con i««-t ares
I*UWOW tneihing t-hctthi break
or l»ur«"-' s-.ptose a -w<.|\J fi-h should
come aions' ar-i ;ob his sword ker
chunk" thr 'i met -ujtpo-e a
atiark o? a wha c or a «*ev*l I -to or some
oth r :nV'*i.il -rs monster -hould
thick ii-. ano her Jonah ar.d gn!p m»
down- *lthoot -alt. jrepper or cere j
tmny of any sort!
Ktrrvtbng acemed to bp whrlittg j
I h*oked through the gla-s and •JW j
water water water aid when it
seemed as if I had gone down about a
mile or more, my feet struck sum
tliißfr solid with a heavy thud, which
kaocted the wite out of me and wade
me feel «ore that IBT time bad roM
andlw»a"e«nn ' But I" w«» aB
right and sale, and near by me stood
the figure of Mr. Warren, who had
preceded my descent I then saw
that we stood on the steamer's deck,
the smokestack and mastA looming op
like stalking shadow* in the water.
We walked up and down the entire
length of the .leek of the noi&e craft,
which upright, half buried in the
•and. We pair" along to the compan
ion-way and descend to the -aloon
All would he invisible here except for
the electric lamp wb - h illuminated
th% whole interior, ao that we eoald
»ee distinctly. There w» hot a little
fur|ii>{! of current-. ind the sea above
wx- almost c»!nt. All the furniture,
and »verything moveable had disap
peared. vimt piece- of carpet and
the stateroom partition remained, the
doors swinging t> ami fro with the
action of the water.
A variety of cru-taceo were visible,
fast#med ail around, and -eemed to be
growing ail the time. There was noth
ing dreadful, tragic, or threatening in
the appearance of anything and noth
ing to inspire terror, although every
thing was «utryestiye of lonline-s. deso
lation. abandonment and destruction.
The most tuMomful, rioooipr im
pressions were received while viewing
the engine room and machinery,
which apparently remain* intact, ju-t
a* it was when the ves el went down.
The huge structure of iron and steel,
the rod*, lever*, pistons, cylinders,
etc.. were nearly all of them—in
position, corroded, soiled and un
-lghtly, yet they still were emblemati
cal of tremedotn strength and power,
paralyze*!, helpless, abandoned.
An ocean giant, entombed in Nep
tune's aqaeou* fravevard!
Mv companion had started for the
lower . m>-.n. and I stond watching the
gleam of his electric lamp—disappear
ing in the distance, I stood and mu«ed
on the mutabilitie- of life. Probably
I had Mood there 10 minutes in pro
found thought, my mind teeming
with rumination-, when suddenly
there came a punch and thwack on
my bock, a shove against my shoulder
and poke in my ribs, felt my knees
tremble aud my teeth chatte-i.
I felt like howling or yelling.
Hut that would do me no good,
I ha-1 tried it liefore. I had
not time to continue my ruminations
when my hemlet received such a
"thwack"—"bang" that caused me to
totter and almost fail.
Ju*t then, as I wa- almost overcome
with bewilderment, I received a dou
ble thwack across my shaulders which
almo-t threw me on my knee-, and,
just as I ejaculated " Oh, l^ordy!" and
gazed through my little easement, 1
-aw a great yel'ow eye, set in a huge
scaley head glaring at me through the
glass" Thi* sudden and novel appari
tion started up new fright, and I won
dered what sort of a «ea monster it"
might lie. All that was visible to me
through my narrow little window was
a staring, glaring, savage, menacing,
voracious-looking yellow eve, and sur
rounding it *a- a ponderous scaly
creature, floating—or rather lying pas
sive. My startled imagination made it
appear lite a small mountain—a whale,
leviathan, or perhaps a genuine old
sea serpent. My heart went "pit-a
pat," great drops of perspiration stood
out upon my face and a quiver of ex
citement jNisses-ed me. I commenced
to speculate on the po-.-ibilities of lie
ing doomed as a second Jonah, and
tried to reckon the probabilities of my
being gulped down that hideous
monster's throat at one mouthful. 1
rea-oned within my-elf that I could
not lie so easily swallowed, clad as 1
was in that diving costume of coarse
rub *r and canvas, with the heavy
metal shoulder piece and helmet, and
if 1 was po-dbly gulped down proba
bly I would not prove such a tooth
some morsel as the whale had antici
pated. All 1 could do was to hope
that his whalcdtip would swim along
the coast until he reached Coney
Island or l.ong Branch, und there cast
me up—on the beach—whence I could
find may way home. All this time,
while these thoughts rushed to and
fro in my mind, that glaring, staring,
fiendish eye was mercilessly rivited
upon me. Suddenly there was a com
motion in the water, and the horrible
lishy in. übu* -warn away; and as it
floated oildn the light, I discovered it
to he a harmless, innocent, huge sea
ba-s, about four feet in length, and
very likely its curiosity as to what
manner of creature I might be wa-as
jireat as my frightfal apprehension of
it- intention* toward me.
J list then, greatly to my relief, mv
companion returns, give- the signal,
and we are drawn up to the deck of
our-launch craft, r.leased from our
•living dress, and soon are steaming
briskly along, •homeward bound."
Haint(\
THK IIAM FACTVIIE OF OAS.
A Hluiple Kxplaautlon of the Way
Illuminating <!a* la Made.
New York Graphic.
How few people can Intelligently ex
plain some of the most ordinary thing*
in every day life. An official of the
city gas work- was heard to -ay not
long ago that if he might judge bv
the number of times he was asked for
information not more than two people
in ten know how common illuminating
ga- is uiada. They all >eeni to under
stand. he -aid. that it conies out of
-oft coal, but thev are ignorant of the
process by which it is extracted. We
do not doubt thi* at ail, for. as we have
-aid to you several time-, it is the com
mon things that we are apt to over
look in our search for information.
You will un ler-tand, therefore, why
we select subjects to talk a!>out with
which you and everybody else ought to
be familiar.
Now. let us give you a pimple expla
nation of pas-iiiakiiig, Break up a
niece of bituminous coal Into small
iraiments and fill the IK>WI of a i lay
pi|ie with them. Cover the mouth of
th<- Imwl with wet clav ami then thor
oughly dry it Put tin' bowl of the
pipe into a tire where it will pet red
hot ami you will soon sec a veUowish
smoke come out of the stem. and if
you touch a light to the -moke it will
nurn brightly, for it is nothing more
or le-s tlian the pas from the coal
You can purify ami rolled this gas
in a simple way. Kill a hot tie «ith
water ami turn it up-ide down in a
liowl of water Yon know the water
will not run out of the lioitle because
the air pressure on the water in the
howl will prevent it Put the end of
the tiipe-trm under the mouth of the
bottle, and the pas will bubble up
through the water into the bottle,
gradually di'-piaoing the water, and if
the pi|>e Were large enough to make a
great ileal of ga- the bottle would be
entire!* filled with it.
You have -een the immense quan
tities of coke which thev have at the
gasworks; that i- what is left of the
coal after the gs-h.n Ken burned out
of it Coke is carbon, only a -mall
part of w hat was in the coal having
gone off with the gas. Take the clay
covering off your pip# and you will
find the howl tilled with this coke.
Now. that is precisely 'he way ga
ls made in large quantttie- at the pa--
works In-tead i»f pipe bowl- thev
use hig rvturtf, and ar* batted
rtsi hoi bv funum, f«»r lh*» fir* tmiat
I* (mteWW tbr rrttirt' ]l»*atirsp
rtxil rr*l h«»t in a rkoMd retort i> uif
fe'fnl from kmminir it In *h«" open air
A Urjff (nun ihf P»*ort oarrw*ot!'
thr produt ?of the coat. «>f
•tr»n>. tar. air an*i imu-onu, a«s aril
a« pi* Thr ammonia and t«r pro into
tanks, ami tbe into cooler-, ami
tb«*n OT«*r lime, vrhwh up the
a. id« in it, into thr imnifn* ir»*n ?*-
h<4*ter* wh:«*h YTMT hare JWJI at the
work*
Thr holder* are open at th- bottom.
an«t stand, or rather -win*, in tank*
of water. >*»•>•? 4U!jta«ted by mcjuwof
wei#rt*?!» A« tl»e jr i- jnto them
thrv r,-«' up ist the wafer l»»;t the
rna are alwa> * -übmerprti. o t.'iat
ti»e fras can noi m-aj*. The largnr
«"■ mam#. »* hev are
.-on?-»v i *th thr hoi U'r- ir.vi conduct
thr jrta the »trrets to the
where it i> u«ei m** m«ar«
U ir.vrv to tiir ira" f v th« Wright of the
fwm hv4tler», which are ai«aT» bear
THE SEATTLE PQ6T - INTELLIGENCER. SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 11, lm.
KIDNEY DISEASE.
Mistaken Symptoms sod the More
Reliable One*.
3D lags WkM C«««W l«n<«"7
Alarm -Kesalta A**-rllerf »s Ott«r
Kui»» tin* KM«) Tr..«M».
"The man who doc-or- him elf baa
a tool for a patient." This i- true in
actual di-ea-e or -evere derangement*,
bat there are many trifling ailments
which can be overcome with -imple
mean-, with which every one should
be familiar. In constipation, for in
stance. remedie* are found on the
Üble; in other fords the trouble can.
in nearly all case*, be overcome by
ranruLT ar.in.iTis«. ths nrr.
Dietetic treatment i- often ail that il
necessary in numberless other afflic
tion*. and surely it can be -afely ap
plied by a person po- esmng a rea-on-
I able amount of intelligence. To keep
| within the limit-of safety, one niu-t
draw the line at drugs They -houid
not be used except by tbo-e who have
a full knowledge of their action. Very
many people are unmindful of the
danger-of "physic tippling." and do
themselves much harm bv it. All
medicine- are dangerous unle— taken
under proper condition- and in cor
rect do-e-s. Chlorate of potash, which
is a popular remedy for • ore throat, is
considered harmles-, and is, therefore,
often taken in much too large quanti
ties I»eath in con sequence of an over
done occurred in thi- city some years
ago. Hence, in attempting self-treat
ment. let drugs alone, is a rule which
all will do well to observe. At. things
con-idered. it cannot be, bv anv
any means, held that a little knowl
edge of medicine is a dangerous thing.
And in-tead of discouraging the non
professional acainst studying the
causes, nature an.l symptoms of
di-ea-e, he should I* encouraged to
do so, for more rea-on* than we have
already given. .
"My kidneys are troubling me is a
complaint which one frequently hears
made. Probably there are no organs
in the l>o.lv which are oftener wrong
fully accused of being refractory than
the"kidnev-. a fact due to a general
ignorance »f the symptoms which thev
excite when di-turbed or diseased,
lioubtle-- more than nine-tenths of all
the cases which the patients them
selves believe to be kidney trouble are
actually due to disorders of the liver
and stomach. A cloudiness of the
excretion is a-sunted to lie evidence of
kidney disturbance, and yet, that ap
pearance is much the oftenest noted
in patient- who are simply bilious. In
fact, in kidney trouble alone, unless of
an acute character, the excretion is
seldom cloudv. When the bladder is
affected then that change is noted.
Per-ons who deep in cool room- in
winter are • frequently disturb
ed by the thick appearance
of the excretion, and led to
dose them-elves, notwithstanding the
fact that they are feeling well. That
condition observed is reail v of no con
-equence, and appears in health ; the
solid constituent- are simply precipi
tated bv the action of cold, and readi
ly dissolved again if beat is applied.
A sediment in the excretion i- com
mon in hot weather, and generally ap
pears during the -übsidence of afe
brile attack, even if -light. Another
symptom which i- almo.-t always con
strued a- an evidence of "kidney trou
ble" is a pain in the back. That is a
verv common error. I'ain may occur
in diseases of the kidney, but it rarely
doe- so, and hence alone the symptom
is really of very little importance.
In hot weather the quantity of
fluid passed is much le-s than
in cold weather, unles-; liquids in
a proportionately greater quantity
are taken into the stomach. A quart
and one pint i- al>out the normal for
twenty-four hour.-. If the quantity
falls much lielow that, and no rea-on
such as we have stated, apiu-ars for it,
then it is evident that the kiineys are
lesa active than they should I*. One
popular remedy i:"i those cases i.s gin.
which cannot be sanctioned. An
other i- sweet -pirit of nitre. A few
correct doses ol' that taken at inter
vals. can do no harm. Front one
half to one teu-iiootiful in a tumbler
of water is the dose for an adult, and
it may be repeated, if needed, every
three or four hours until three or four
do-e- have been taken. Prolonged
Use is quite certain to upset the -tom
ach. Uetter than either of these, to
stimulate the action of the kidneys, is
cream of tartar water. The proper
way to prepare it is this: To a quart
of boiling water add a tabiespoonful
of cream of tartar, the juice of one
lemon an.l two tablespoonfuls of
sugar. it Ftaml oil ice until cool.
If this is taken freely it will have the
desired effect. . The kidneys fail to
properly perform their functions in
certain diseases- a- typhoid fever—
aside front those of the kidneys tlicm
selves. Occasionally in persona who
feel well tho-e organs appear to be
slightly inactive for a .lav or two at a
time, ami then the trouble pas-es off.
Only in uch case* is self-treatment
justifiable. If the derangement lasts
for a longer time, or the patient is
otherwise ailing, a physician mast lie
consulted, for there is danger in delay.
Being "obliged to get up often at
night" i- considered bv many an evi
dence of ki.inev .ii-onler. That need
points to the bladder a- the seat of the
di-turbance, and if continuous the ad
vice of a physician i- imperative. An
exces-ivc action of the kidneys, much
above the normal quantity "stated, if
persisted for several weeks, would in
dicate diabetes. Occasionally the
quantity is much increased without
that di-ea-e lieing present, but only tor
a short time a day or two -unles* the
quantity of fluids taken is tin
u-u.dly large. Hreater activity
of the kidneys i - quite a com
mon sympton in recovery from
a bilious ntl tck. and the patientalwavs
feels better for it.
The true ■ ymptom* of kidney dis
ease are not many, but they arc very
different from those which are gener
:U!v accepted
The term " Bright'* disease " is used
to'designate a variety of important
changes in the kiduev. It may tie acute
or chronic. The first symptom which
usually appears in the acute attack is
dropsy, which exhibits' itself by a
slightjv.itline-> in the eyes At the
-ante time there is more or less
fever, which is, in «ome iases.
preceded by chills or chilly senwations.
There are al-o 10-s of appetite, thirst,
great re*tle«-ne**, headache and occa
sionally pain in the loins Vau-eaand
vomiting are frequently early tsy ;up
toms. The ki .Beys are inactive, the
quantity of excretion is usually scanty,
and at time- has a smoky appearance.
These are the principal signs which
are manifested in an attack of Bright'*
disease. As a rule the chronic form
of Ihi-disea-e l>e;.in< slowly, tealing
on, as it were, insidiously. Probably
in a large proportion of cases it exi-t*
for many month- before it is discov
ered. and in the meantime the victims
con'tiler them clve* perfectly well.
Often the first -ign* to excite uneasi
ness are a general loss of strength
and a rrowing p ilerte-s or-allowtiess
of complexion. There i- also di-in
chnation to exertion, fatigue being
ea-y. Occa-ion ally tlie tir-t -ymptom
is drop-y. appearing in a puffne** un
> er the eyes, or a slight swelling of
the feet and ankles. This is a promi
nent s\ iiiptom in some rase* but in
ether- it is nevrr very markeil. In
all forms of Bright'* disea-e symp
toms referable to the digestive
are more or le-s pronounced; indiges
tion or d» speptic diac rder i* common.
Ileauache i* also an exceedingly com
mon -ymptom and of'en it i-one of
the first to appear A frequent com
plaint is trouble with the -ight which
suffers -low impairment, and the pa
tient eventual'* has recourse tj glas
ses.
The-e are in brief -otne of the eariv
ign* of "Bright'* disea e." As will
appear tuejr are run «ii«iir u tive. for
i '-ne of them p. n»t directly to ihe kid
ney* The most accomplished ;>h\ -i
am cannot depend upon
other «vtDptoms alow, bf wtffA
SSd beferehetoMa
person his kidneys were affected. The
Solvcertain Mnub chemical analy
ns and microscopical ei*minataon 01
the excretion. Tbe public *hoaM re
member this one important fact, ana
never accept a physician - s opuuon as
of TitQ6 on til he bA*i scctuvd. tJlIf
positive proof.
TOBI BID or FLIBS.
A Xilmnlbt Telle Wky the Sef eeae
Do Urn* Keep Tfce* ©■«-
Sew York Mail and Exprw*
-How do tbe flies pet into the house
with screens on all the windows and
door* ?" is a question a«ke-l by hun
dreds of boose wires who are annoved
bv the pests. A naturalist who has
looked closely into the hahits ot the fly
•aid "The swarms of nie* that are
so troublesome during the letter part
of the summer and in the fall nan u
out in the house. The screens shut
them in instead of keeping them out,
and reallv do more liarm than good.
It is phvsicallv impossible to keep
ererv fly out of the house in summer
time"; but bv exercising a litttle care
thousands of tbem may be excluded.
"Nearly all of the trouble is caused
bv aljout a dozen sluggish specimens
that emerge from their winter retreats
on the first warm days of spring.
They mav be found on the sunny win
dow of any room not in constant use.
They should be kille I at once, as thev
deposit the eggs from which the mil
lions of summer flies are hatched.
Thev are prolific insects and one old
flyis capable of populating a whole
house with progeny in a single sum
mer, Instead of killing the first flv of
the season many people make a pet of
it. Its sluggishness and halt-frozen con
dition excite pitv, and it is not unusual
for the most careful housekeeper to
feed and warm it out of pure ten
der-heartedness. » A folded towel
•hould be kept handy and the early
flies killed as soon as ther appear.
Then if care is taken to leave no par
ticles of food and sugar scattered
around the kitchen anil uinning-room,
and to keep all substance on which
flies feed covered there will tie no
trouble from flies. Some families
who take these precautions even dis
pense with screens in the win
dows and doors. If the flies come m
from outdoors, they find nothing to
live on and seek more congenial
quarters. It is best to use screens,
however, as damp and rainy weather
invariably drives flies into the house,
and they are troublesome until it is
clear and warm outside."
CAUTION
Beware of Fraud, as my name and the
price are stamped on the bottom of all my
ad \ ertised shoes before leaving the factory,
which protect the wearers against high
prices and inferior goods. If a aealer offers
W. L. DOI'GLAS shoes at a reduced price,
or says he has them without my name and
Srice' stamped or. the bottom, pnt him
own as a fraud.
W. L. DOUGLAS
$3 SHOE GENTLEMEN.
The only calf 93 SEAMLESS Shoe,
smooth inside. NO TACKS or WAX
THKKAD to hurt the feet, easy as hand
sewedaud WILL NOT KIP.
W. L. DOUGLAS *4 SHOE, the original
and only hand-sewed welt $4 shoe. Equals
custom-made shoes costing from |6 to $9.
W. L. DOUGLAS S3 50 POLICE SHOE.
Railroad Men and Letter Carriers all wear
them. Smooth inside as a Hand-Sewed
Shoe. No Tacks or Wax Thread to hurt the
feet.
W. L. DOUGLAS *2.50 SHOE is unex
celled for heavy wear. Best Calf Shoe for
the price.
W. L. DOUGLAS •2.35 WORKING
MAN'S SHOE is the best iu the world for
)ony?h wear; one pair ought to wear a man
a year.
W. L. DOUGLAS Si SHOE FOR BOYS
is the best School Shoe in the world.
All made in Congress, Button and Lace.
If not sold by your dealer, write W. L.
DOUGLAS. BROCKTON, MASS.
TREE* & RAYMOND, Agortw
FOR SALE.
Two lots, corner of Mill
and Second streets. This
is one of the best blocks
that is for sale in the city.
One lot, corner of Com
mercial and Main. This
is a fine location for any
kind of business, either
wholesale or retail, and
will make one of the best
places fer a bank in the
city.
An extra bargain on
Front street.
Three choice lots on Sec
ond street.
Three lots on Fourth
street.
Choice residence lots in
all parts of the city.
HEFNER & UISHON,
'JOS.J (MUfliwial vLSeattkW.T.
Washington Savings Sank.
Incorporated under the Territorial laws.
Kill Street, Hext Door to PostoAet.
Seattle. W T.
CAPITAL, - - £50.000.
OFFICERS:
W. W. IiEARROKS. President
B. B DRAKBoRN Vic^Prt-sid**nt
11. HIilN?.. < a&hier
A Gcsertl Basing Ctisißess Transacted.
Dra/U drawn on all part* of the world. |
Inb*re»t paid ou aaviag* and time deposits.
Accounts of merchant*, manufacturers aud
individuals ftolleited
The hank will be open for the transae
t on of bu«ine»« from 10 a. m. to I p
and Saturday eve mugs froa 7 toti o'clock.
Interest allowed (rom the third
day of every month.
Interest dividend days are Jan
uary Ist and July tst.
Imay be issiSe in jrmyj or by
re*i«.rvd letter, moor, ordi-r or eiprrsa,
taoks will be r»turzie*l a. re-
M HWJ loaned en r-.al otalt at reasonable
rate*
SCHWABACHER BEOS. & CO.,
Importer* and Strictly Wholesale Dealer* in
GROCERIES, HARDWARE, IRON AND STEEL,
BUILDING MATERIAL, MINING and BLACK
SMITHS' TOOLS, FARMING IM
PLEMENTS, ETC., ETC.
our Price* with either San Francisco or Portland. Printed Price
Lifts mailed on application.
SCHWABACHER BROS. A CO. Uscoar p.)
THOMAS OOWBN
Consulting Mechanical Engineer and Surveyor.
PTAXS AND SPECIFICATIONS OF STEAMBOATS, STEAM ENGINES BOILERSAI®
•h kind* of mechanical strnctnres. Work superintended when under construction,
steame urine* indicated and alteration* advised upon the view of economy of fuel or
development of greater power. Steamboat*, ships and all kind* of machinery bought
and soldon commission. Whoever mav be grnng into new enterprises or alterations
would find It to their Interest to consalt with Idm Vfbre entering nponit Room
Butler's Block. Seattle MM
Oolls.©tt <Sb M!cOeLll"u.m,
Successors to Peterson Bros., Importers and Dealers in
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS
Orders by jVfail Solicited.
814 FRONT STREET. ' P. O. BOX 114.
WM. H. HUGHES
Printing Company,
SEATTLE, "W- T.
All kind* of book and Jab work 1 COLUMBIA STREET,
a apeclalty. I Opposite Engine House So. 1.
J. BCIIRAM,
STOVES AND TINWARE.
COMMERCIAL STREET, SEATTLE.
Call before baying (oodl In that line.
MORAN BROS.,
Iron Founders and Machinists,
AND DKXLKRS IN
Mill ud Steamboat Engineers' supplies, Iron, Brass and Copper Pipe and Fitting*;
Steam and Water Brass Goods; Machine Bolts; Cop Bet and Lag Screws; Steam and
Hand Pomp*; Hose Parking and Waste; Cylinder and other Lubricating Oil*: Steam
heatlnr (or pablic and private buildings.
We have the most complete pipe catting and threading machinery north of San
Francisco. Land and marine engines, and all kinds of machinery built and re
paired. We hare on hand and for sale low, second-hand engines and boilers.
Mill street, corner Railroad avenue. Postofflce box
N. ARMSTRONG .& CO.,
Livery Hack and Sale Stable; Managers of Seattle
Transfer Company.
First-class Turnouts. Orders filled at any hour day or night*
Telephone 41. Office corner Main and Second streets.
Pharmacy Hallt
Northeast Corner Second and Columbia Streets,
SEATTLE. - W. T.
WASHINGTON IRON WORKS GO.
Foundry, Machine and Boiler Shops,
Corner Second, Jackson and Third streets, Seattle.
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO.,
SHIPPING AND GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BUILDING,
TACOMA, W- T.
Importers of English Steel Rails, Pig Iron, Fire
Bricks, Fire Clay, Coke, Cement, Fine and
Common Salt, Tin and Terneplates, Sal
Soda, Caustic Soda, etc., etc.
Advances made on shipments of Lumber, Wheat,
Flour and approved merchandise and produce, to the
consignment of their Houses in Liverpool, and Val
paraiso and correspondents in Australia.
Balfour, Guthrie A Co., San Francisco, California.
Balfour, Cuthrlo Sl Co., Portland, Oregon.
Balfour, Williamson A Co. Liverpool, England.
Williamson. Balfour A Co.. Valparaiso. Chill. )i«
HARRINGTON & SMITH.
(■partem and Wholesale Bealers
Have now on band the largest and bast selected stock e*er broußht to rugct Sound.
GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, HARDWARE
Iron, Steel, Cardafre and Ship Chandlery, Floor, Feed, Hay and Qraln, Booti
and Sboea, Crockery and Glassware, Paint* and Oila, and all kind* of
Staple and Fancy Groceries,
A!«o IJme, Brick, Platter and Cement. Amenta for Flah Bros. A Co.'*
celebrated Wagon*.
Commercial (treat, Seattle, W. T. HAKKINOTON * SMITH.
English Steel Rails
FOB SALE.
To arrive per Britith Ship "Melpomene,"
now on passage to Pnget Sound.
800 tons 30-ft. Rails, weigh 40
lbs par yard.
800 tons 30-ft. Rails, weigh BO
lbs. per yard.
For prices apply to
BALFOUR* GUTHRIE & CO.,
Tacoma. W. T.
8. BAXTER <fe CO.
Offer for sale in lot* to rait:
200 Sack* Early Rot* Potato**.
1000 Sack* P**rl*a* Potato**.
300 Sack* Bnrbamk Potato**.
100 TOD* Timotky Ha jr.
100 Ton* Timotky aid Clor*r Hay
100 Too* Eastern Waakiacton
Wild Hay. 50 Tom* Wk.at.
S Car* Bran and Short*, mlxad.
SO torn Onud aad Rolled Barley
Spakaa* Mill* Extra Flour.
EUaaaknrgk Mill* Extra Floar.
SOOO Sack* Ckoio* Waskineton
Oat* at le per lb. ia aay quanti
ty from oa* aack upward*.
Fred E.Sander
BE.VI.IHt HI
REAL ESTATE
LOCAL SEdRITIKS.
OFFICE,
Comer Mill UHI Commercial lU.
J. Sl* Fit INK, Superintendent.
Chas. Loucb,
THE GROCER,
1412 te 1416, - - Front Street.
Make* a roecialty of keeping tbe large*!
and freshest stock of choice
Groceries aid Pnmms
In the city, and a* he buy* in far
greater quantities than any other
Kcer in Seattle, he solicit* and i*
t able to fill orders, either large
or small. Yon will find that on ac
count of hi* immense trade his
whole itock is kept fresh and
clean, aud that he is able to (tire
ro* better price* than any other
house in the city. Also carer aud
packer of the
1888
BRAND OP
Eaitera Cora-fed, StKar-oarad
Uncovered Hami and Bacon,
Which he sella right fresh from his
smoke-houfte, by the single piece,
crate, ton or carload. Bole aire at
for HALL BWIS*
DUNGENESB BUTTER
Charles Lonch,
FRONT AND UNION.
All thronlr, Nervous and Special
Diieaiei Skillfully Treated.
Dr. E. a. Johnnon, who recently spent
eifht m-nths in the principal bo* pi tali
aud leading m»dical inatitatioiii of New
York City, having rf»umc! prartic in Be
attlr, la Drrpared to tr>-at all Olilto ("rl
iiary l>i»ca«e«, all Skin and Blood l>is
ra*(i. all ailnienia ariaing irum a W-ak
ene.l Kcfrotu all Di»t«»e* of the
Kidney, Heart an 1 Lung*, all Ifcfctal L>i»
raari and all Dioraar* Pvaliar to Wuiuen.
according to the :at«t and mint improved
method*. Consultation Yrtrr Ofllra—
roomait and #O. Ni» Yeiier Block, Mill
street.
Seattle, Lake Shert S Easten Rj.
CHANGE OF TIME.
OS AND AFTER SUNDAY. OCTOBER
», 18», traina will depart from and
arrive at Seattle as follows:
Leave. Arrive.
B B .:«pm
s wf y T^i h o Q ; nd !" 9:s °» m » s:s °r- m
Suburban trains,]
SSTS'iSS B 130pm B »:»p«
Wash, at Yesler. J
®£"' UV i A A 915 * m
"A" daily. "B" daily except Sunday.
W. J. JENNINGS,
Gen. F. and P. Agent.
THE GIiEAT
TRANSCONTINENTAL ROUTE.
Northern Pacific
RAILROAD.
▼IS THE
Cascade Division. Nov Com
plated. Making It tko Short
oat, Boat aad Qslokoat.
The Dining Car line. The Direct Route,
No Delays. Fastest Trains. Lowest Rates
to Chicago and all _points East Tickets
sold to all prominent Poiuts throughout the
East and Southeast Through Pullman
Drawing Room Sleeping Cars. Reserva
tions can bo secured in advance.
To East Baaad Passengers:
Be careful and do not make a mistake,
but be sure to take the
Men Pacific Bailniad,
And see that your ticket reads via. this
line, 8t Paul or Minneapolis to avoid
changes and serious delays occasioned by
ether routes.
Through emigrant Sleeping Cars run on
regular express trains full length of the
line. Berths free. Lowest rates, keat
time.
General office or the i'ompaay, Ji Task-
Ington it, Portland, Oregon.
A. D. CHARLTON, Ass't Gen. Pass. Agt
No. 2 Washington St, Portland, Or.
W. B. SPKNCKR,
Ticket Agent, Seattle, Wharf.
A. CHILBERG,
Ticket Agent. Seattle.
0. R. & N. CO.'S
STEAMERS
TI7IIX LEAVE SEATTLE CITY DOCK
II dally for Tacoma at -a. m. and 3p. m.
For Victoria—Daily, exeept Sunday, at
Ulna. m.
For Olympia—Daily, except Sunday, at 2
a. m.
Touching at intermediate points on all
routes.
Seattle, Whatcom A Semiabmoo Route.
STEAMER CEO. E. STARR
Leaves Seattle at 9:30 p. m. Mondays.
Wednesdays and Friday*. Arrives at What
com at 11 a. m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and
Saturdays. Returning, haves Whatcom at
1 p. m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, and on
Sundays at 7a. in. Arrives at Seattle at 2
a. m. Wednesdays and Fridays and on Sun
days about 9 p. in.
Leaves Whatcom for Senaiahmoo Satur
days at 1 p. m. Leaves Semiahmoo for
Whatcom Saturdays at 5 p. m., arriving at
Whatcom about 9 p. m
NOTlCE—Steamer lands at all regular
landings except Dak Harbor, Laconnerand
Fldalgo.
U. S. Mail Steamer Hassalo
Leaves Seattle for Whatcom and all way
landing* Suudays, luesdays and Thurs
days at 11 p. m. Arrives at Whatcom Mon
days, Wednesdays and Fridays at ft p.m.
Returning, leaves Whatcom name days at
8::*) p. m., arriving at Seattle Tuesdays,
Thursdavs and Saturdavs at 2 p. m.
W". H. HOLCOMB, tieni. Manager.
C. W. JOHNSON, Superintendent
A. L. MAXWELL,
Oenl. Pass, and Ticket Agent.
J. R. POLLEY, Local Agent,
City Dock.
DAY BOAT.
Fait Steamer
W. K. MERWIN,
Leaves Yealer'a wharf for
"WtLGLtOOm.
At 7 a. ra., tout-bin* at Clinton, Holmes
harbor, Conpevllle, Ctaaladv, Unniacr,
garnish and Blauchard's. every Tuesday
and Friday.
Mfc For rreiyht or passage ripply at W.
8. «T. Co.'s office. Yealer'a wharf. )eZi
Washington Steamboat Transpor
tation Company.
CARRYING THE V. S. MAIT
SEATTLE-PORT TOVNSEND ROUTE
STKAMERS ANDERSON OR EDITH WILI
run daily between Seattle and Port
Townsend,h aving Seattle at 10: opm, touch
ing at Fort Madlsou, Port Gamble and Port
Ludlow. Returning—Leave J ort Townsend
daily (except Sunday) at a. 30 *. m.
SEATTLE-WHATCOM ROUTE.
Steamer Waahiugton leaves Seattle, Sun
day, Tuesday and Thursday at 9 D. m.
touching at Clinton, Conpeville, Oak Bar
bor.l'taalady, I Aconner.AnacorU-s, 'liiemes
Sarnish, Fairhavea, Bellingham and 8e
home. Returning—Leaves Whatcom MOB
days, Wednesdays and Fridays at 6 p. m.
SEATTLE-SKAGIT RIYER ROUTE.
For freight and passage apply at compa
ny a office on Yesler's Wharf.
H. F. JACKSON. Ass't Manager.
pacific mmm chmiy.
THE STEAMER
Skagit Chief
I EAVES HARRINOTON & SMITH'S
J .wharf for San Juan Islands, toacbiag
at Cllßton, Utsaladv, Htanwood, lACnnner.
Friday Harbor and Rache Harbor every
Sunday and Thursday.
For freight or rates apply on board steam
er, or to HARRINGTON A SMITH. A rents
HENRY BAILEY. Master
PACIFIC NAVIGATION COMPAM.
THE STEAMER
Henry Bailey
I EAVES YESLER WHARF FOR TULA
j lip. titauwaod, ML Vernon, Sterling
an<l intermediate point* every Saturday
and We«ine*day.
For freight or rates apply on board steam
er or to Geo. 11. Foster ag^nt.
8. T. DENNY. Master.
STEAMER W. F. MUNROE,
(Carrying V. & Mail,)
Leaves Seattle fer Kdmuudr, Mukllt*-
Marysville and Bnohnraish
Dally, except Hun<lay.
For freight or |>a**age Inijnire on boar'
•r at Yesler wharf.
C. l> BROWNFIILD, Manager.
OBOKOC H. J 9TKB .Agent Seattle.
FLEETWOOD
LAID UP.
Winter Time Table
WILL BE GIVEN
In a Ftnv IDavs.
Pacific Coast Steamship Ci
One of the
ELEGANT A 1 IRON STEAMSHIPS
Of company will leave Ocean Dock.
Seattle, every Friday at « o'clock lTm*
(Passengers received on board at S p. !i)
For Port Townsend, Victoria
AND SAN FRANCISCO.
Q»«cn of the Pacific y--- t
Imatilla Nov. i«, 30. Dec "u. J*
Walla Walla Nov. a. Dec. 7* a 'ju .
Returning, steamers leave San Fr*n<-iil
every Friday at 9 o'clock a. m. f
FOR ALASKA.
Steamers leave as above fr.rtnirhtlv kr.
Wran gel, Juneau. Sitka and other Uas>»
ports. "*■ S
Idaho Nov. 7,
A neon Nov. 19. Dec. 17, Jan! it'
roR FREIGHT OR F4SJUGK XTTLr To T«*
COLUMBIA A PCGET SOI ND R. R. rn
W. B. SPENCER, abvol
H. McLEI.LAN, mnt -
Pnget Sound Snpt. P. C. S. a. Co.
Cinadiai Facile
RAILWAY.
THE THUB
TRANSCONTINENTAL ROUTE
BETWEEN
THE PACIFIC AND THE ATLANTIC..
IPMBNT 19 TH*
I. finest lu the world,c-> sisttugef I usff
ous Sleeping Cars, havln drawing 'souk,
ing and bath rooms; Co fortabie tad
Clean Colonist Cam, with ce gleeain*
Berths for holders of second cam tickeff
and the most modern stvle of day eoack«a
Its Dining Cars a,id Hotels provide the.
beat quality of food tn unlimited uuautitv
at reasonable ratea
The Variety and Grandeur of Scenera
along its line is unequaled, and lathed*-,
tails of track, train service, etc., nothiug lit
omitted that can add to th? Safety an«.
Comfort of its patrons. All in all, it give*
the best and most servicable line of travaL.
whether for business or pleasure, betwMfe
Portland. Tacoma, Seattle, Victoria and (Hi *1
Pacific Coast Points, and Winnepeg. Min
neapolis. St Paul. Chicago. St Louis, Otta
wa. Toronto. Montreal, Boston, New Yak
ana ail Eastern Cities.
Throagk Tickets are Issued to all PrtaetMi
Polata la the Tatted States, t'aaada
aad Karop* at lowest Rata*.
For detailed information apply to the «»y
lowing agents of the company:
C. G. McCORD,
6 Washington st. Portland. Ot
E W. McGINKESS, Seattle. W>
E K. ELUS, Tacoma, W.¥.
D. K. BROWN,
District Freight and Passenger Agent,
Vancouver, B. C.
Correspondence respectfully solicited.
Caaadiai Pacific KaTicatin 0».
(LIMITED. ' * ■'
STEAMER
PREMIER
BOUND SOUTH.
Vancouver, Monday Toxrnsend, Thursdto*
it Thursday 2p in A Monday ySOr a.
Townsend, Monday battle., Friday aaC
& Thursday 11 p m Tuesday
Seattle, Tuesday and Tacoma, Fridav ant.'
Friday are Tuesday 12 n«ta •
BOUND NORTH.
LXAVK A SRI VI
Tacoma, Tuesday & Seattle, Tuesday DM'
Friday 3p m Friday ft 00 a B
Seattle, Wednesday Timnwnd,
& Saturday. Gam A Saturday..9 AO a c
fownseud. Wedn'sdv Vancouver, Wedne»>
A Saturday 10 am. day A SatdyiSOpß,
DAYS OF DEPARTURE FROM SEATTLE.
Wednesdays and Saturdays.
BAYB OF ARRIVAL AT SKATTIJ:
Tuesdays and Fridavs.
JOHN A. O'BRIEN, Master.
F. J. CHPRCH Agent at Seattle;
JOHN laviso. Maagr. C. V. N. Co. M.
TO SID FRANCISCO, CAL
BY WAT OF THE
Mem Facile Compaifi
LINES.
THE MT. SHASTA ROUTE,
Quicker la time than any other routs bt»
tween
Seattle and San Francisco
LEAVE SEATTLE DAILY AT 4 P. M.
ARRIVE IN SAN FRANCISCO, 7:40 A. tt.
Throagh Time Fortj-Kigfct Hoars.
TheUrand Scenic route of the PacMcCoaafc.
PULLMAN BUFFET SLEEPERS.
Tomrlat Sleeping Cars
For accommodation of aeoond class paaMoa
gera attached to exptesa trains.
For ticketa and other information call o»-
A. CHII.BERQ,
Ticket Agent, Seattle, W. T.
E. P. ROGERS,
Assist. Ge». Freight and Pasa. Agent
R. KOIHLKR. Manager.
STEMRCMRIBROWK
LEAVES YESLERS WHARF FOR T*
coma, Olympia aad Big Skookum at 1r
a. m. every Monday, Wednesday and Fri
day.
Returning, leaves Sheltou, Big Skookvn
at 7 a. m every Tuesday, Thursday and Sair
wnlay
PUGET SOUND SHORE R. B
Time Table, Taking EfToct
Sunday, May 27, 1888.
Leave. Arritav
Tacoma (passenger)}. 4:4Sa.Bi. Klop.tr.
Tacoma (mixed)* 3.30 p.m. 12.16 p.m .
Stuck Jnnctien (mlx'd).ft:'JS p.m 900 a. m .
tConnects with the N. P. R. K. for Fort -
laud and the East.
•Connects with X P. R. R. for Portland .
I. A. NADEAI',
General Freight and Passenger Agent
T. J. Mll.stn. Manager.
COLUMBIA & PUGET SOUW>
RAILROAD.
Time Table, Taking Effect
Sunday, May 27,1888.
Trains arrive and leave ieattle as fol
lows
Leave. Arrlva.
Newcastle and way/. tßi _
sutions (mixed).. ! ?wpm..
Franklin and way sta ' 7 00a. m '2 Vp. m
stations* . I 3;30p. M.li CUp.m
•Coal.
T. J. MII.NKR Superintendent
ISPINNET
& CO.'S
PRIVATE DISPENSARY,
319 Commercial street, vomer
Jackson, Seattle, W. T.
All chronic Diseases of MJEN and WuMKK
saecoaaftiny treat. "t.
LOHT MANHOOD, Nervous a»<l Khyalea*
Debility, Kihaasted Vitality, riemine
Weakiiesa, Hpermatorrhoea, lM|Kitenc.e,
Gonorrhoea, Oleet, -typhlitis, I'n iu stare De
cline, Weakness In Wumen. and all Func
tional Derangements that rrsult from yimtt.
fa! fullien or -xeess In after years.
URINARY Kidney, and Hl»l'ler tronblei,
uninflu I Wl Mt iia. k, Gonorrhoea, alert,
f'rystlsls. Varicocele. stricture, etc-, promt- a
ly and aafvly enrnl. No nauseous medwfaa
given, nor strong tnjeuure used whieb
cause stricture Charges reasonable.
NFRVOLIS Debility, Losaof Vigor, Seminal
ntBTWUB U*a«. Night Emissions IK
atwndeucy, etc., etc., enred.
YOUNG HFN ■affcrln* from the effects#
lUUßbltn > ., )llUl(n , i folltea or Indiscre
tion, Kh'iulil avail themselves of our treat
ment. the greatest boon ever laid at the al
tar lif Buffering humanity. Will guarantee
a jiositlve ctire In every case.
Middlf-Jfini Men There are many troubled
■ IQUIE «geu a til W)U) too tr. H) »ent evac
uation of the bladder, accompanied by a
•martini; or burning acnkatlon', on examin
ation the urine depo«iU a sediment and
aometirnea albumen In present The color
vanes from a brigh' «r reddish to evT a
milky hue, the patient experiences a wi ak
ening of the system In a manner he cannd
account for. This la the second
seminal weakness. Many die of tills 11#
..nlty, ignorant of its cause A perfect cart
and healthy restoration guaranteed.
Office bonrs, 10 a m. to Sp. m.: 7toV p.
m.
N. B. persons nnable to visit a* may te
tn ated at their homes by correspond" lira
Medici tins and instructions sent by BIS) at
expreaa. Consultation free' dAw

xml | txt