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The Seattle post-intelligencer. (Seattle, Wash. Terr. [Wash.]) 1888-1914, November 18, 1888, Image 6

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045604/1888-11-18/ed-1/seq-6/

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POINTS ON DRESS.
What Wm» Slwold Wear for Wed
diac*. Fowrala, Etr.
TM radrfM la )k>aa*wfcat f
la Bsgard I* rati Piaaa
fteiteral HIbU.
Mew York WorUL
What is the correct dres* for a man
to wear on all occasions'? With the
reawakening of social life in town th:s
question presents iteeif to the Individ
ual New Yorker The formalities of
fashion require nice discrimination on
the part of men «f taste, making it im
perative that proper distinction be ob
served in the matter of raiment under
the varyln? dmtmstanoes of social
a.- -emtlage No one hat a boor
would dream of offending de orum by
wearing the «aroe dress at a funeral
that be had worn at an afternoon re
ception. for instan-e. In the '»»«
way it would be unpardonable to ap
pear at the opera clad in a business
suit or to attend a tennis game in
swallow-tail* A safe rule to follow is
one which the arbiters of -trie desig
nate as the happy medium, it is enrs
tahzed into two words namely,
"avoid extremes."
K vening receptions' of every charac
ter demand full dress. The same is
true of the theatre This season the
most stylish material for dress suits is
a finely-woven diagonal, which is de
signed to fit the form clo-ely and to
hold its shape even more firmly than
the er»twhile popular broadcloth. The
latter will still be worn, however,
especially by elderly and middle-aged
men A« to the details of the make of
a dress suit considerable latitude is
• allowed. Manv will wear vests open
U-diaped, while others will affect a
narrow cut. Dress coats faced all the
way to the edge of the lapel are con
sidered in best form. A straight
standing collar, or one with the ears
squarely turned, is the style in use by
the be«t dresseM. To harmonize with
the embroidered shirt-fronts that have
come into sudden popularity this fall,
a satin band bow raav be worn With
plain or plaited bosoms it is deemed
proper to wear none but a white lawn
lie For ballroom wear a white vest
is allowable. Black silk vests of otto
man, matelasse or moire antique are
also considered elegant, although per
sons of severe tastes look upon this
fad as an innovation. Dress troupers
are worn wider than formerlv.
avoid MAHosns A*r> jiwn.iv
The question of having one. two or
three eyelet* in a dress shirt Is left to
the option of the wearer, although a
decided preference is shown for two.
Cuff- should !« of square cut, fastened
bv link buttons. The custom of
wearing jewelrv with evening dre«s
has l«en severely criticised, but in
stead of disappearing it ha« liecome
quite general. All agree, however, that
it i- vulgar to display flashy diamonds
or a heavv gold chain. Fob chain- are
allowable', and the shirt studs, if three
or two are used, ought to be small and
made of mother-of-pearl, nlain gold or
enamel. Dress gloves should lie of
Karl tint, with broad stitching .in the
cks, either of same color of black,
as fancy dictates. The only handker
chiefs sanctioned by fashion are plain
white linen aud pongee. A heavy cape
Inverness overcoat is still the fashion
able top dressing for an evening suit.
Crush hats are no longer thought cor
rect. the regulation black -ilk having
the preference. Either patent-leather
shoes or delicate calfskins, highly pol
ished, a rein good use.
What dre«s shall a New Yorker wear
at an evening ball, or a theater party,
or a dinner ? The general rule is to
adopt the full dress in all its details,
except where no ladies are present, and
then a little more freedom i- permitted.
For instance, at a stag dinner a black
tie or a cream satin may I* used in
stead of the regulation white lawn,
without committing a serious sin
against propriety. Every invitation
dinner, whether at Delmodico's or at
a private house, is considered formal
and requires evening dress. At an in
formal dinner, whicn is the result of
a mutual agreement !>etween a few
friends, a I'lince Albert or cutaway
coat is all right: in fact, little heed
need be paid to dress beyond those
general conditions of neatness and
taste required of gentlemen always.
roistn os wri>ni!«o«.
It is said that fashion is offended at
weddings oftener than at any other
social gatherings. At evening weddings
the dress *uit must I* invariably Worn.
This is a law of etiquette that under
goes no variation. Plenty ol discre
tion is granted, however, in regard to
the to wear at day weddings.
When the nuptials are performed in
the afternoon, either at home or in
church, the men present are supposed
to wear n double-breasted frock cost,
or at least a cutaway. Fashionable
tailors say that the cutaway is rapid]v
supersedfng the Prince Albert on all
semi-dress occasions. This is e«{«ec
ially so in New York, the custom hav
ing not as yet taken so strong a foot
hold in other cities. Whichever
coat Is worn it should l>e black.
Either tbe three-button or four-but
ton cutaway is proper, the latter being
considered a trifle more dres«y than
the former. The vest shouhl be of
the same material as the coat. The
raiKt stylish trousers to wear at a day
wedding this season are a light ca»h
tnere with a small dark strip* 1 or sub
dued check A four-in-hand scarf or
a well-made Terk. either in white, pale
blue or grayish shade, can l>e u>ed
,V delicate snuff-colored glove ein
broidered in self or in black villi bar
tnonise with the poimlar crate for tan
shades now prevauitif?. \ ** arf pin,
if not too loud, is in food form. A
standing dress collar is the right style
to wear and a silk hat is proper. The
immediate participant* in the wed
ding ceremony may wear the same
costume as the male gue*t>«.
The most elegant taste can display
Itself at an afternoon reception. It is
the one occasion when a man can give
full vent to his lore lor dre*s without
provoking criticism. Of coarse vul
gar effects must I*? avoided, hut a
wider range is offered to select from
both :n the materials of clothing and
in the matter of furnishings. At pres
ent the m»»st stylish co.it to tr»!v ,i
dark cutaway, say of vicuna cloth or
wide wale" diagonal The rest «hould
match the coat, but trousers any
pattern that is not noticeably loud are
iiuite in form. The aide r it! * irf or
tne A«cot sfcane is the preferred thing
in neckwear, although stvttah four-ln
hands in light silk hare an equal right
to consideration. Fancy tints are not
at all objectionable in neckwear, and
tan glove" are all the go. V silk hat.
ami on wet dav* a derby. and patent
ieather or calfskin shoes complete the
elegant outfit.
«H\r *M*irU» UK WO** AT rrMIRAUI
It ha" come to a matter of icreat
forma!i:v what dk>thf« to wear at a
funeral. The mounter* well under
ftiantl that thev should wear black
throughout, wi'h crape on the hat, but
the relation of the attending friend* to
Ihe occasion i" frequent)* overlooked.
The hivsi experience*! le.»<ier■> of *tvle
»re unanimous in mimrinr at. the at
tnnlint* at a tuneral to don t>l*< k
clothe-* \ diagonal or tight corkscrew
coat and vest may I* worn, with
trouper* to match or in heavier m fe
rial lUa.k kid gloves ant) a black
•carf, *ay a piMinun fowr-inhand. are
indi*pcn*a!ite. It U held preferalde to
wear no jewelry although a neat
ecarfptn i« allow al4e.
Attend me out-door -port* inch a*
baseball. tenni*. yachtm*. hfetclitj or
racing a man can wear am thing ti.»t
it comfortable ami in conformity with
accepted -trio- Jaunty color* are not
in had form at Add *p«rt« Startling
effect* can he used there if any where
Check >«it». cither cutaway .>r i>*ck
are perhapa the j»o«t pScturV-ifie and
ta«tcful Only derby haU should be
worn, and taii-coiorvil -feoe* are noa
approve.! hy ewn the moat Critical
juiU-e- of decorum At the ra . e track ;
a Udv business »mt made in rough
faced good* i« by all odil> the ten
thing to appear in. If a centtemaaj
escort. ladies the case is dtflerent. A
cutaway B not a Prince Albert » l»-
nritiu swiw cireomstanne*.
The 'ancy fail mfo which are ao much
in New York this rear may
be worn with almost any rwtuine
on the rare track. A Chester-
ItrM overcoat, (ttotw
an A a st >ut a«h -tick with silver
i {Haled handle and wide silver band
make op the re«t of a styfelt outfit.
OtBTOATV (itfTIS.
fn traveling or j>ursuinjr an ocean
vovage a man should be tlad warmly
and ti-iflr. Erery ttades* garment
•hotildbe left at home. This is an in
-tance of where the law of common
sense comes in ahead of the demand
of style. Nothing more cumbersome
than a single-hs* sated cape overcoat
ought to be .arried. fsack suit* and
cutaway frock •> are mi Hi hut forallthe
emergencies of traveling, as the dress
suit is never repaired unless by way
of exception on extremely formal oc
casions. A .'derby hat is the proper
caper, and colored percale shirts, with
collars and c»ift> to match, may be
used instead of white.
Connoisseurs of fashion find an un
failing subject for criticism in the
costumes worn by many of the fore
most of New S'ork society men while
driving In the park or on the road.
Certain well-known clab men have
been charged with imitating English
grooms in their Milted affectations of
,ires- The most charming effect a
gentleman in an ordinary road wagon
can produce is one of quietness. There
should be nothing unusual or startling
about bis make-up. He should avoid
every appearance of being "horsey."
wearing no clothes which he would
not wear walking on Broadway. The
proper glove to wear this season is a
tirmlv sewed dogskin In one of the
C puiar tan shades. or a chamois
ither ganntlet glove if so desired. A
melton or kersey overcoat in drab
colors and a derhy hat may be worn at
all time*.
CiIKLS WORTH MILLIONS.
Foor Unmarried American Women
who Control Enormoui Fortune*.
Puti.Atiri.rHiA, Nov. 3.—The an
nouncement of the engagement of
Mi-* Ixiuise Mouvier Drexel. niece of
A. J. Drexel, to Mr. Edward Morrell
of this city, bring* up the subject
of rich unmarried girl*, an interesting
Mibject at any time. Mi-s Drexel and
her two unmarried sisters are "aid
to be the three richest unmarried
ladie* in the I'nited States. This
statement is open to dispute.
To these three ladies was left a for
tune of (13.000,000 by their father, the
late F. A. Drexel. It was so forested
as to bring ea. h an income approxi
mating yearly. To Miss Mary
Garrett, daughter of 'the late railroad
king, was left $'20,000,000. Misg fiarrett
is a money-maker, and has accumu
lated a fortune since her father's death,
so that the combined fortunes of the
Dresel ladies cannot be equal to hers.
It is undoubtedly true that the
Drexel ladies are the three wealthiest
unmarried -i«ter»inthe United Htates.
The one whose engagement is an
nounced is the youngest of the three.
Mr. Morrell, the bridegroom-elect, is
one of the handsomest young men in
Philadelphia society, but has no for
tune. His father "is dead, and his
mother is married the second time to
John «i. Johnson, a well-known attor
ner of the city. The family is
well known, and occupies a respected
position in society and business.
Voun£ Mr. Morrell's mother was a
conspicuous American beauty fifteen
years ago, and for sereral seasons held
«way orer society at Newport. She is
still a beautiful woman, and although
her age must be above fifty, she has a
face and figure that attract attention
wherever she appears, ."she is the
daughter of Col. John Hare Powell,
and the family are well known in so
cial circles in S'ew York, l'oston and
elsewhere, as well as in Philadelphia.
The Drexel girls are models of good
sense, and while they are not known
as accumulators of money, they are
not likely to waste their great fortunes.
They give a great deal to charity, ami
each year >|«nd a fair portion of their
incomes in doing good to others. The
Francis de bales Home, erected by
them is their most notable public
charity. This is one of the finest
orphan homes in this country. It
was planned entirely by the ladies
themselves. They studied architects'
plans and builder's' t-stimaUs for two
years prior to deciding up the extent
and style of the structure, and
in almost every detail of the
great building tbe"plans adopted were
their own. The house stands in the
center of an apple orchard, and is sur
rounded by 250 acres of land. The site
is a beautiful one, and the home will
long endure n a noble monument to
the founder A peculiarity of the
building is the large nnml-er of win
dows and their unusual sire, enabling
the sun to t>>netrate to the center of
almost every room, and the building
is lighted throughout by electricity
and heated by a system u! steam heat
ing that is almost perfect The young
ladies take a great deal of interest in
the management of Francis de Sales
| Home, and their handsome equipages
' are often seen at the institution.
l'he Drexel ladies are Catholic*, but
noi «o orthodox in their faith as their
father. A clause in his will leave- the
entire estate to Catholic charities in
| the event that all his daughters die
without issue. Is is a mooted ques
tion in Philadelphia whether the other
two M-ters will ever marry. They are
devoted to charity ami the manage
ment of their fortune", aud there is a
general opinion that they would re
gard a husband a- likely to be in tbe
way. They are all noMe girls, and fit
to be queens of king".
The late Jo-eph W. Drexel, who left
an e-tate valued at $,">.'11)0,000, was an
utii4r. < >nc-tbml of the shares of tlie
Philadelphia fublic Isilgrr were owned
by him. and, after his death, were
! bought bv hi - brother, and George \V.
Cbilds. '
It is likely that to Mi<» Mary Gar
rett, daughter of the founder of the
Kaltimore A Ohio Railroad, ami not te
either of the Misses i»rexel. belong*
the d<«tinct:ou of being the raeheat on
married lady in America. Mis* Gar
rett is nronably a tetter business
woman than cither of them. She has
the commercial acumen of her father,
ami her |*eactration and discrimina
tion in business affairs are much re
marked among business men of Balti
more where her movements in com
mercial affairs are watched with much
interest. With all this va»t wealth at
her dtsno*al Miss Garrett's < hief char
acteristic is her modesty, which hardly
v.. » . liupjt ic with the h :rl\ b irly
which the management of f'JO,O(*>.oOti
would sntsil It is well understood
that Miss <»arrett. and no other, man
ages her large fortune Had her
brother Robert been a- < areful a tinan
* ier. the Haltimore A Ohio road might
still be controlled by the <»arrett es
tate.
Miss Oarrett had a thorough school
ing »n finance For seteril yetw prior
to her father N death «he tv hi* trust
ed asMstont in the management of the
Baltimore .V Ohio road, a# weil a- in the
handling of his real estate in IValti
rnofe and fl«eirhw. No one was
uilener • on-ultrd lor important detail*
regarding the business of 'he road :han
\l!»- i..irret! "-he had ;» perfect
knowledge of the financial utitiu of
Ihe property, and had her *ugge>tion*
l>e«n followed after her father's death,
it i* believed by many bVHMM men
that the road would never h.ire i*en
taken out of her brother'.* control.
On M-veral a-ion». when the prop
erty became enl-ing!'J M>i i-arrett
advamed enough money to help the
road over a >n» - Once *he
to a>tvaDve a loan hri iuw of a doubt
in her own mind regarding a portion
of Ihe -<-cuntv ihlrml.
It s- *asd tli.it M 5»« «»arrett. in hrr
effort* U* turn an boMM penny,
umb»lt iroKts the «t»e ilatitr ei
changit, bar in#? a nit»rVi.i frair that \i
once got into tin* whirlpo«4 itould
mtit-bt drag her down If Oouiti ever
get- the aiT>nt>mr of Mary (Barrett it
w >ll hare to 1* in a deal in government
bond> or giit-edged rval e-utc
After the Mi«*s l>retel and
tiarrett cotne* Mis» Hcilie tiould ana
n. h urtmarried woman. Mtaa (iould
t» track younger than either of the
THE SEATTLE POST - INTELLIGENCER. SPNPAY NOVEMBER 18. ifcfr*.
■ - ——————————g—
others. Cniike them she is not nefc
is her on right, bat proapeetively d»
ranks fourth among the wealthy
an married women «t the United Stttea.
H her father meet* with no reverse,
and be Menu to be aWe to take car* of
himself. her individual fortune ought
not to be far from s2Bf*f</*r>.
A Philadelphia tanker recently «d
to the writer that the combined for
tunes of the three Drexel ladies,
counting their arcnmalations SUM*
their father's death, were not far short
of fI iSKOJOOft. Mtas (iamo's fortune
mi-t now be $£.'.000,000. and if Mi»s
Gould can muster pMmfiK we hare
$57/MIQjOOO to be dirifted among fire
unmarried American girls, either one
of them worth any man's lore, al
though she did not hare a dollar in
stead of millions.
Canadian Pacific
RAILWAY.
THE TRUB
TRANSCONTINENTAL ROUTE
BETWEEN
THE PACIFIC AID THE ATLANTIC.
ITS PASSENGER K IP WEST IB THE
finestintaeworlJ.es "dsuoic*f Lajtari
-011 si.-pine Cars, havia drawing, smok
ing and hath rooms; Co fortable and
Clean ColoHist Cars, with r ce Sleeping
Berths for holder* of second class tickets,
and the most modern style of day coaches.
Its Dining Cars ajd Hotels provide the
beet quality of food in an limited quantity
at reasonable rates.
The Variety and Grandeur of Scenery
along its liae Is unequaled, and In the de
tails of track, train service. . nothing is
omitted that can add to tut safety and
Comfort of its patrons. All in all. ft gival
the best and most servicaWe line of travel,
whether lor business or pleasure, between
Portland, Tacoma, Seattle. Victoria and all
Pscifie Coast Points, and Wianepeg. Min
neapolis, Bt Paul, Chicago, St. Louis, Otta
wa. Toronto. Montreal, Boston, New York
anil all Eastern Cities.
Ttnuk Tickets are Issaed to aO PriadfM
Points la the raited States, fa—da
aad tlsrope at Lowest Hatas.
Tot detailed Information apply to the fol
lowing agents of the company:
C. G. McCORD,
6 Washington et, Portland, Or.
E. W. SfrGINN'ESS, Seattle, W. T.
E. E. ELLIS. Tscoma, W. T.
D E BROWN
District Freight and'Passeager Agent,
Vancouver, B. C.
Correspondence respectfully solicited.
TO SAN FRANCISCO, CAL,
BT WAY OF THE
Men Facile Coipft
LINES.
THE MT. SHASTA ROUTE,
Quicker to time than any other route be
tween
Seattle and Jan Francisco.
LEAVE SEATTLE DAILY AT 4 P. It.
ARRIVE IX SAN FRANCISCO, 7:40 A M
Tkrmfk Tta* Fertj-Etcht Heart.
Tbe Grand .Scenic route of the Pacific Coeet
PULLMAN BUFFET SLEEPERS.
Tourist Sleeping Care
For accommodation of second class passes
gers attached to express trains.
Kor tickets and other Information call on
A. CHILBERG,
Ticket Agent, Seattle, W. T.
E. P. ROGERS,
Assist. Ges. Freight and Pass. Agent
R. KO«HI.«B. Manager.
PUGET SOUND SHORE R. R.
Time Table Taking Effect Sunday,
November 11, 1888.
Leave. Arrive.
S °Exp C re°s &Ud Eaß,ern ( 3:45 a.m. 10:20 p.m
Southern and Eastern| ,30p.m. 9:25 a.m.
Seattle and Tacomaf XW) ._
Freight t *.a>am. <i:oop.m.
Southern and Eastern mail carries Pull
man sleepers.
I. A. KADEAC,
General Freight and Passenger Agent
T. J. Mi IN Kg. Manager.
STEAMER W. F. MUNROE,
(Carrying D. 8. Mail,)
Leaves Seattle for Edmunds, Mukilteo,
Marysville and Snohomish
I>atly, except Sunday.
For freight or passage Inquire on board
er at Tester whaii.
C. D. BROWNFIELD, Manager.
G«o««.* H. Fosraa Agent Seattle.
Washington Savings Bank,
Incorporated under the Territorial laws.
Kill Street, Next Door to PostoSee.
Seattle, W. T.
CAPITAL. - - $50,000.
OFFICERS:
W. \V. PE.VRBORN President
B. B. DEARBORN*. Vice-President
H. W HIGGINS. Cashier
A General Banking Basiness Transacted.
Draft* drawn on all parts of the world.
Interest paid on savings and time deposits.
Aeconnts of merchants, manufacturers and
individuals solicited.
The bank will be open for the transac
tion of business from 10 a. m. to 3 p.m.,
aud Saturday evenings from 7 to 9 o'clock.
Interest allowed from the third
day of every month.
Interest dividend days are Jan
nary Ist and July Ist.
LVpoAits may be made iu person or by
registered letter, money order or express,
and dtrpoalt books will be returned as re
quested.
Money loaned an real estate at reasonable
rates
MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK
Designated Depository and Financial
Agent of the
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT
Dea!» in foreiga and domestic exchange*.
Make. Tkix«k%i-hic Tra>sfkr* and la
rue«
General Banking Business Transacted.
HBATTLE
SAFE DEPOSIT AM) TRCST CO.
Paid-ap Capital, SIOO,OOO.
Pars interest on saving* deposits.
Rent* safe* and deposit boxes.
Receives good* on storage.
Makes mortgage loans.
H'HKD WARD, Msnsgsr.
PUGET SOUND ACADEMY,
CeuptTille, Wkldbj Island, V. T.
Fall Term Begins September
27, 1888.
nstruction Thorough.
Expenses Moderate.
Some t haaw have been raa<tc in the
of teaefeera A thwroujrhly
tent B»: teat her has been aeourvd. and
inatru< tion will a]*o be given in Painting
and {'rawing
For further information aldreas C. K
SEWBEKKY.t ville. W T. tnthsaMk*
THOa K.RITZ. HAKKY KRCTZ.
Pr» allien?. Sw't aaiiTrm
Wciihinfton Urn \ Trust Cwiptay
(immromAT**.)
Authorised Capital. f.00.000
laid ap i apitaJ *j,OUO
MORTGAGE LOANS
improfed Fires ud Cltj Property.
IOWKST Um-NO DELAY
BiukKtii of n< ■—U' Mill » ifc-cMlental
Bk.e» , SEATTLE W. T
UtOHliE ruWUI. Vaiafer
lU*Ti*jf iWicn-fe' H <>*.lway. New
Y< >' 4 3 S»-ar> Rmldia#. fUt«ou.
«l-T*ajl orrni*—Home Office. Walla
w alia, * T.: Etik'ii (ffti-w. folia* and
Seattle.
FURNITURE!
If you are going to buy furniture it will be to
your interest to examine our stock and get our prices,
for we have the largest stock and the lewest prices,
"the same quality of goods considered," of any furni
ture house in the city.
We have and are constantly receiving an im
mense stock of
BEDROOM SUITS,
PARLOR SUITS,
SIDEBOARDS,
HALL RACKS.)
BOOK CASES,
EXTENSION TABLES,
OFFICE DESKS,
FOLDING BEDS,
And everything that|is to be found in a first-class
Furniture Store.
0. W. LYNCH & CO.,
117 Commercial Street.
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO.,
SHIPPING AM GINIRAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BUILDING,
TACOMA, "W. T.
Importers of English Steel Bails, Pig Iron, Fire
Bricks, Fire Clay, Coke, Cement, Fine and
Common Salt, Tin and Terneplates, Sal
Soda, Canstio Soda, etc., etc.
Advances made on shipments of Lumber, Wheat,
Flour and approved merchandise and produce, to the
consignment of their Houses in Liverpool, and Val
paraiso and correspondents in Australia.
Balfour, Cuthrie A Co., San Francisco, California.
Balfour, Cuthrio A Co., Portland, Oregon.
Balfour, Williamson A Co. Liverpool, England,
Williamson. Balfour A Co., Valparaiso. Chili. jyst
INSURANCE!
IN ALL ITS BRANCHES,
Fire, Marine, Life and Occident.
TAYLOR k BURNS, Agents,
Do an Exclusive Insurance Business, representing 26
companies, the best in the world. Prompt
payment of losses.
Hefer to Any of or r old oustomert*
• fflc® In Butler*i Building, James street, Seattle.
■ . ————
BOOTH ft BRISCOE,
Abstracts of Land Titles,
Have the oldest and most reliable set of abstract Books In the ceunty.
Koonis 3 and 4. Yesler-Leary Building
L. K. G. SMITH:,
IMPORTER AND JOBBER OF
Clgut tad Tobaccos, Meerschaum Goods, Pipes, Cutlery, Stationery, ate.
Mill street. Yesler-Leary Building, Seattle. W.
MF~ Sole agents (or the Flor de Madrid Key West Cigars.
the <;in:at
TRANSCONTINENTAL ROUTE.
Northern Pacific
RAILROAD.
VIA TBI
Cascade Divlalon. Nov Com
pleted. Making it the Short
est. Beat and Quickest.
The Dining Car line. The Direct Route.
No Delays. Fastest Trains. Lowest Rates
to Chirago and all points East. Tickets
sold to all promlneut Points throughout the
East and Southeast. Through Pullman
Drawing Room Bleeping Cars. Reserva
tions can be secured in advance.
To East Beaad Passeajrrrs:
Be careful and do not make a mistake,
but be sun to take the
Mertbers Pacific Railroad,
And see that your ticket reads via. this
line, St. Paul or Minneapolis to avoid
change* and serious delays eccasiened by
ether route*.
Through emigrant Sleeping Cars run on
regular express trains full length of the
line. Berths free. Lowest rates, quickest
time.
Weeeral Mr. .f the t onpasj, Me. t Waafc
lagtaa st., Portlaad, Vregaa.
A. D. CHARI-TON, Ass'tGen. Pass. Agt.
No. S Washington St.. Portland, Or.
W. B SPENCER,
Ticket Agent, Seattle, Wharf.
A. CHILBERG,
Ticket Agent, Seattle.
AKDEKSOH, BKRTKAHD ft CO.,
Civil sad Mlilai Eaglassrs and
Drsagktaasn.
RAILROAD, MINING, WATERWORKS,
topographical, bridge, sewerage and
drainage engineering given special atten
tion. City property or lands surveyed or
subdivided Maps and mechanical draw
ings. and biae prints a specialty.
Township plats and maps always on hand
Rooms 39 and SO. Yealer U-ary block. Seat
tle, W T jus lm
ADVICE TO MUTHKBS.
Mrs. Winsiow's Soothing Syrup. for chil
dren teething, is the prescription of one of
the beet female narse* an<l phvaacians in
the Cnited r-'stes. and has keen aaed fur
forty years with never tailing success by
atilliona of astbrn for their children
During the process of teething its value is
in'-aicatable. It relieves the child from
t*in. cures dysentery and diarrhoea, grip
ing la the bowels and wind colic. Bv giv
ing health to the child it rest* the mother
Price Me a bottle. aag»dwly
DR. SPINNEY
Sc CO.'S
NATIONAL DISPENSARY,
319 Cosisisrcisl street, oorner
Jaekaon, Seattle. W. T.
All chronic Diseases of MEN and WOMIIV
successfully treated.
IXJST MANHOOD, Xervoas aud Physical
Debility, Exhausted Vitality, semina.
Weakness, t*i**nnatorrhoea, Im»oten< e
Gonorrhoea, Gleet, .Syphilis. Premature De
cline. Weakness in Women, and all Func
tional Derangements that result from yoetfc.
ful follies or excess in after years.
URINARY Kidney, and Bladder trouh*<s,
Weak tta-k, Gonorrhoea, Gkat,
Crystitis. Varicocele, Stricture, etc., prom j t
ly and safely cured. No nauseous medicine
given, nor strung Injections used, which
cans*- stricture. Charges reasonable.
NFIVnUS I>ebility, Loessf Vigor, Seminal
nLßivuo Nlirht Emissions, Dt
spondency, etc., etc.,cored.
YflfiNfilfFN suffer tig from the tifrcatf
IUUHU Btn voullifn" follies or in.!tscra
tions, should avail themselves of our treat
ment. the greatest boon ever laid at the » ■
tar of suffering humanity. Will guaranti e
a positive cure in every case.
MidrilP-Jldwl Mad There are many troubled
■iQuie agea leu wlth too freq „ ent eTat .
nations of the bladder. accompanied by a
smarting or burning sensation: on examii. -
ation the urine depoeits a sediment ai.d
sometimes albumen is present The eoler
variea from a bright or reddiab to even a
milky hue, the patient experiences a weak
erring of the system in a manner he cannot
account for. This is the second stage of
seminal weakness. Many die of this liffl-
Jttitr, ignorant of its cause, A perfect can
and healthy restoration guaranteed.
Office hours, 9 a. m. to r> p. m.; t> to 9p.
m.
N. B.—Persons unable to visit us may t e
treated at their homes by correaponden; e.
Medicines and instructions sent bv mn' or
expreaa roTisnltation free dAw
IMPORTANT
TO INVESTORS
|£A KICK RESIDENCE IX)TS NEXT Til
I«JU Jackson Street Cable Road and Soatb
school hoase. onlv 10 minates' walk from
postoffice; on graded street. The best and
cheapest property ever offered. Prioea
from |4<JO to lIOML
GEO 808 DORFITtL,
OfHce. Commercial street, between Mill
and Washington, at stairs.
SHE IS GRATEFUL."
"I saved the life of my little gi rl* by a
prompt BSC of Dr Acker t English Kernedv
for consumption. Mrs. Wm. V. Ham man
New York, ror sale by A. B. Stewart,
druggist. g
CAUTION
Beware of Frand. a* my name and tt*
price are stamped OR the bottom of ai! my
ai«eri»*d .Ihm before leaving tt- iac'ary.
which pioirot the wearer* axaiast bijtfc
price* and inferior pnods. If a deaJer often
W. L. DOCGLAS at • reduced price,
or np he has them without my nante and
price stamped .to the bottom. pnt hrm
down u > fraud.
W. L. DOUGLAS
$3 SHOE OENTUEIIEN.
The oiiiy cAI 83 SEAMLESS -hoe,
smooth iaside. NO TACKS or WAX
THREAD to hurt the feet. easy as hand
sewed and WILL NOT RIP.
W. i_ DOL'GLA- .-HOE. the original
and only nand-sewed welt W shoe. Equals
custom-made .»hoi-« eostin* from $6 to
W. L. DOI'ULAS »:s an POLICE SHOE.
Railroad Men and Letter Carrias all wear
them. Siaooth inaide as a Hand-Sewed
Shoe. No Tavks or Wax Thread to hurt the
feet.
W. L. DOUGLAS SJ..-.0 SHOE is unex
celled for heavy wear. Best Calf Shoe for
the price.
W. L. BO To LAS WORKING
MAN'S SHOE is the best in the world for
ioß(rh wear; one pair ought to wear a man
a year.
W. L. DOUGLAS 8? SH'>E FOR DOYS
is the best School Shoe In the world.
All made in Couifress, Button and Laee.
if not sold by vour dealer, write W. L.
DOUGLAS. BROCKTON. MASS.
TREES A- KtfMOll, liMtw
HARRISON FOB PRESIDENT.
Washiniton a State.
Protection for Coal, Iron,
Hops, Lumber, and
Wool.
OUR LOCAL WEALTH.
Prosperity and Progress
FOR
THE QUEEN CITY,
AND
We have to offer 30 lota, t>oil2o, on Madison
street, in a thickly settled district, one
mile from tbe Occidental, at toOO each:
half cash, balance one year, at lOper cent
First choice is always the best, so come
early.
VALENTINE HALL,
Offlee with L. H. Griffith, basement Occi
dental building.
WANTED.
Wood choppers, $1 •& cord.
Cordwood contracts to let.
Servant girls, I'JO to
Railroad men, XI, tl 25, |2 .10.
General employment always on band.
FOR SALE.
Stage line of 56 miles, including 14 horses
and outfit, $ -WOO.
Meat market and half interest in build
ing; well located. Will fell cheap for
cash.
Two second-class lodging houses. 8 rooms
and rooms, well furnished, £>so to f IJUO.
Restaurants, 9&M to lIOOU.
Furniture in five-room house, near Com
mercial street, |2M). Kent mouth.
Fruit and cigar store, $125.
Three-chair barber shop; no rent; ftiOO.
Floor wall tent, $33; scow for brick or
wood .
Fine Improved bottom ranch, stock aud
tools, P-00&.
FOR REN
Ranch, 12 acres, cleared, SOO year.
Ranch of 200 acres. 90 acres bottom land,
fenced and seeded; 52 acres pasture; with
farming implements and stock ; *SOOO year N
G. W. "CRANE.
W. T. Employment Bureau,
Washington sL, near Commercial.
PROCLAMATION.
Ily the Mayor of the City of Seattle.
Wherea*. On the 2d day of November.
I***. by order of the common council of
the City of SealUe, a special election was
ordered to be held on the 19th dav of No
vember, ISKs, In order that the voters of
said city might at said election vote for or
against the erection of sneh certain water
works as were described in the proclama
tion of the mayor of said city calling for
such election; and
hi iva*. Said *t*ecial election was order
ed to be held under the provisions of sec
tion 12 of the amended charter of the city
of Seattle, a* complied and published by
order of the common council thereof; ana
Whereas. It now appear* that caid section
12 of the said city charter ao compiled aud
issued, U not a correct copy of said wfltlop,
a* printed and published in the session
laws of in this: That, whereas sec
tion U of Mdd compiled charter provide*
that the said Question may be submitted to
the voters of Seattle at a "general or special
election," the section as published in said
laws provides that such vote may be had
only at a "general election; ' and
Whereas, It thus appears that no au
thority exists for hold lag the said "special
election" in virtue of said section 12 of the
charter of the city of Seattle. Now,
Therefore, It is herebv ordered that the
call for such special election, to be held on
the l!>th dat of November. I*Kh, aforesaid,
be and is hereby rescinded aud annulled,
and that no further proceedings be had
j thereunder ROKERT M<>RAN, Mayor.
Dated Skattli, Nov. 1*», IML
NOTICE.
THERE WILL BE AN ANNUAL MEET
ing of th>- stockholder* of the Seattle
Dry I>ork A Ship-building ri)9)«uv at Ihr
office of the c<at Moran Br u> , iu
the eltjr of Seattle, W. T., Nov. 2J, ikw, at
10 o'clock a. m., for the purpose of the elec
tion of officer* for the ensuing year aud
the trinuctioii of such other business as
™»r properly come before the meeting.
By order of the president.
GEO. KELLY, Secretary.
Seattle. W T. Not 5, UM. f
A NARROW ESCAPE.
CoL W. K. Nelson, of Brooklyn, came
bome one evening feeling a peculiar tight
new in the che»L Before retiring he tried
to draw a long breath but found It almost
impossible. He suffered four days froat
pneumonia, and the doctors gave him np.
Dr. Acker's English Remedv for cossum p
uon saved him and ke is well to-day For
ale by A. B Stewart, druggist. s
THE OCCIDENTAL
3BATTLB, WASH. TIT
Si
■ m «k|A m _ _
E. B. R1 IS DLETT, - Manager
This hotel, which is leased by the SEATTLE IIOTEI. COMPaTF has
heen enlarged. remodeled and completely refurit'thed Th-n:ighout "lti»
now one of the iargv-sl and twst appointed bote!* in the Northwest, with
wnißKxlitioM !n: wrwtl hunirwl fnw!' An unrivalled cuisine Eleri
tor anl all modern convenience*. Tourists will find the (iccideofai - .1-.
ant and convenient place to mall* tbefr headquarter', a* *!) inset
San Francisco and Alaska steamers make Seattle their pole* of iVnartiu®
TEEMS: - 52.50 TO 553.00 PER DAY
Special Ram to Craunerml M»n and Parties of Tourists. ntr
THE DUMAP*
MEDICAL ASD SURGICAL ISSTITITE AND DBPBSAII
[lncorporated under the laws of Washington Territory,!
Yesler's New Block, Junction Mill and Ci nmercial Sts.
,Kooma 36 and n, Seattle, Wa«h. Ter.
Permanently established (or the successful treatment of Chronic *_.
and Surgical diseas. sof men and women. Designed at d incorporated forthcsmi
and private rare and sut-cev«fui treatment of persons suffering »;th diseases ,>j
Nervous System, all Chronic Diseases. Diseases of the Heart an-; liraln, Kasal Th«
Lung and Cheat IDiaeases and Asthmatic Affections. I'rethral. Rectal and Anal I
east s, sunricalaud otherwise, an- treated by our new and painless method* with r
form aud gratifying success
Onr curative agents in reaching 'lt*a«e are remedial speeiSca consisting of
oxidixable phoapborvscent forces of nature, specific medication reaching and cu
disease at once.
SPECIAL DEPARTMENT FOR THE SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF DWEASM
WOMEN.
In this clans of disease with my large experience and uniform success, I hat« ( ,
confidence in saying to la<lies afflicted with anv disease peculiar to their tex, that
my new methods of trea|pier; they can be relieved and < urvd oftentimes las:
weeks treatment.
All Urethral diseases are imme lattely relieved and permanently cured.
Spermatorrhoea or seminal incontinence, a disease which exhausts ths wt
nerrous system. Is manifest to the patient and often guessed by the careful o!«tn
This disease does not always imply impropriety, as it may exist without the Mtla
fault. It is characterixed by impotence, debility, palpitation of the heart melaach
irritability, an unhealthy secretion mixed with the urine, pain in the bead, back I
limbs, confusion of ideas, a tendency to avoid society with an inclination to sollta
Many unfortunate sufferers who have despaired of recovery after spending morh y
and money in the bauds of others, have been restored to virile power and health
my treatment.
The remedies In this special direction are remarkable agents to restore iMtne
&>wer, and are au invaluable brain food, a nutrient tonic that builds np the ha mi
bed blood stream, and restores the mind and body to a high degree of po*?r
freshing the exhausted nervous system and most effectually aud pcrntuettiy cut
canes of nervous exhaustion, premature or otherwise
The treatment of diseases of the*air passages ami lungs, such as cbrooJn u
catarrh, laryngitis, bronchitis and consumption in it* Incipient stage, both tbre«rt<
rcpondeuee aud at the Institute constitute au important specialty.
All sufferers from consumption, nervous, chrouic and blood diseases, brain and hi
affections, dyspepsia aud indigestion, paralysis, nervous and physical ilehiitty, L—
nerve force and power; and all who desire pure, rich blood with increased stna
and vitality, and all those whose vital powers are failing and ho feel the nee* «
vitalizing t'nrtyumfire and rettontfire treatment should consult me at once, ,Vf fx
tmenU or failure*.
Treatment safe and sure in all cases in harmony with the great laws of nature. OK
times only one consultation necessary, balance of treatment without any intai
tion to business. Send for circular.
S. B. DUNLAP, SI. D.
Office hoar* 9to 5 dailv: 7 to 8 ereninjr: SnndaTi 9to 12 only.
Consultation tree and correspondence collated. #u irttrin
ALBERT HANSEN,
MULEK IB
Watches. Diamonds and Jewelr]
ota ageul, for the celebrate.)
STEM WAY PIANOS. f
And other Kirst-oliutn Mukes of Piiino® nnd OrgnnA
TXSLER BLOCK. FRONT STREET. &*»
SCHVVABACHEK BROS. CO.,
(IKCOBPOKATKD)
Importers and IHtrictljr Wholesale Dealers iu
GROCERIES, HARDWARE, IRON AND STEEL
BUILDING MATERIAL, MINING and BLACK
SMITHS' TOOLS, FARMING IM
PLEMENTS, ETC., ETC.
our Prices with either San Francisco or Portland. Printed Prie
Lists mailed on application.
SCHWABACHER BROS. A CO. (ocoar'k)
MO RAN BROS.,
Iron Founders and Machinists,
AND DEALKHB IN
Mill and Bu?»mbott Engineer*' BoppUei, Iron, Brtm tnd Copper Pip© and FlttinflK
Steam and Water Bram Goods; Mat Lint Bolt*; Cop Set and f-sg Screw*; Steam ana
Hand Pumps; Bote Parking aud Waste; Cylinder and other Lubricating Otis; Steaa
w heating for public and private building!.
We hare the most complete pipe cutting and threading machinery north of M
Francisco. land and marine engiuet, and all kinds of machinerv bailt and m
paired. Wehare on hand and for *ale low, second-hand engines and'boilera
WWt" Mill street, corner Railroad avenne. Postoffice box 4M.
Pharmacy Hall'
Northeast Corner Second and Columbia Streets,
SEATTLE. - vv. T,
N. ARMSTRONG & COJ
Livery Hack and Sale Stable; Managers of Seattk
Transfer Company.
rirat-elaaa Turnout,. Order, filled at any hoar day or night.
Telephone 41. Office corner Main and Second utree*
WASHINGTON IRON WORKS CO.
Foundry, Machine and Boiler Shops,
Corner Second, Jackson and Third streets, Seattle
4. M. PKINK, fluperintendMiti
ai
J. SCHKAM,
STOVES AND TINWARE.
COMMERCIAL STREET, SEATTLE.
Call before buying good, lu that Una.
WM. H. HUGHES
Printing Company*
SEATTLE, W. T-
All kind* of Iwokud Jab work COI.L'MKIA 4TKEET.
* I Opporite Engine Home K«v L
Collcett <Bc McCalluno,
Successors to Peterson Bro*., Imjorter-i and Dealers in
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS
Orders by Mail Solicited.
814 FROHT STREET. p. O. BOX
, THOMAS GOWBIT
Consulting Mechanical Engineer and Surveyor.
P LA !J 8 1.. A 5 D MgnCAnOW OFaTKAMBOATH,HTKAM KNCiINKS. Bon.tm
all kino* of m«?chani(-al strvcttires. Work rap«rlntei>ded when nnder <*«u*
bteam engines indicated and alterations advlmm) upon the view of ee»»uoiny of nwg
development r,f greater power. Steamboats. ship* and all kinds of mac binef? kwHg
and sold on commission. Whoever may be wing Into new enterprises or aliersß*
wonld and It to their interest to oousnit with him before entering apontt ®JJS
2A, Butler's Block, Seattle tt*

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