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The Seattle post-intelligencer. [volume] (Seattle, Wash. Terr. [Wash.]) 1888-1914, June 04, 1891, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045604/1891-06-04/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE SEATTLE POST-INTEUJCTENOFP
VOL. XX., NO. 18.
S2OO REWARD!
■ ? We tpi// pay the above sum. to the person
u * i n f OTm 't' on which will lead to the
■Mfa'ut and conviction of the party or parties
■fv-vto are maliciously removing and destroying
Bfliaer advertisements on fences, buildings, etc.,
Br in and about this city.
i W. HARRIOT & CO.,
■ Packers Queen Hams and Bacon, Corner
■ • fVttl and Columbia Street*.
' UWNTENNIS!
SOLE AGENTS FOR
WRIGHT & DIM
GOODS.
CATALOGUE ON APPUCATION.
HAMMOCKS
CAMP COTS,
CHAIRS; STOOLS.
Cordon Hardware Co.,
SEATTLE,
Borers Bros. 1847 Knives, $3.85 per
dozen.
Rogers Bros. 1847 Tea Spoons, $2.75
per dozen.
Rogers Bros. 1847 Table Spoons, $5.50
per dozen.
Rogers Bros. 1847 Forks, $5.50 per
dozen.
ASSYRIAN PATTERN.
11 ojrers Bros. 1847 Tea Spoons, their
latest and best, $3.00 per dozen.
Rogers Bros. 1847 Table Spoons, As
syrian Pattern. $6.00 per dozen.
Rogers Bros. 18+7 Forks Assyrian
Pattern, $6.00 per dozen.
The** gooils are rqual to anv manufacture!
r-very plw *tani|M<d wlt.li makers' namp
\\ r Invltr you U» e*anitn» these cooJR. us nr arr
offering thrni for m short time only at the above
astonishingly low prices.
Geo. W. Hadfield,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL,
StBSII ASI rSIVMVSIKK
RILEY BROS
/)
} - 141 ,
L ATHLETIC GOODS.
SUMMER UNDERWEAR.
. FR ENCH BALBRIGGAN.
LIGHT WEIGHT WOOL.
| SUMMER MERINO.
JERSEY RIBBED WOOL.
SILK AND WOOL MIXED.
I RILEY BROS.,
| MEN'S FINE FURNISHERS,
> 803 Srcon.l Street. <„ rlu . P Colow- i
hl». Seattle. t. S.
or-.-.
i
ORES *1J n f,j * n:
!•* Taroit Atth« *'"J *2° r "* £°ug>». Croup.
?*«. UiuSS: * nd e , v "r «flcctioa of th«
»— fiS?, Confjinptlon.
o*ouuw sigacU "L £a;u,'*
W. P. BOYD & CO.
\ CURTAIN /
1 -AND- \ .
/DRAPERY\
/ DEPARTMENT. \
Fresh from Eastern Manufactories. Very Latest Patterns and Styles.
Something New in Seattle and Also Very Cheap.
But the goods are strictly first-class. See range of prices below
and remember they are better values for the
money than ever shown before.
PORTIERES
For $3.00, $4.00, $5.00, $6.00,
SIO.OO, $12.50, $15.00, $17.50,
$20.00, $25.00 per pair, and
they are beauties.
SILK CURTAINS
For $7.50, SIO.OO, $12.50,
$15.00, $20.00, $25.00, $35.00
Iter pair. The Orient pro
duces nothing finer than
these goods.
Front Street and Occidental Square.
WATCHES, DIAMONDS,
Jewelry and Silverware
GREAT REDUCTIONS
To make room for new and elaborate stock to arrive now beinff
purchased by Mr. Hansen in person in the East. LARGE DIS
COUNT ON ALL GOODS IN OUR STORE.
ALBERT HANSEN, .'. 706 FRONT ST.
GOLDEN RULE BAZAAR:
HEADQUARTERS P'OK
FIREWORKS, JAPANESE LANTERNS.
FIRECRACKERS. PISTOLS.
BUNTING FLAGS. TORPEDOES,
MUSLIN FLAGS, PAPER CAPS, AND
COTTON FLAGS, DECORATIONS OP ALL KFUM.
GOODS SOLD TO THE TRADE AT A LIBERAL DISCOUNT
WHITE KOK. CATALOGUES.
JUST RECEIVED—A carload of Refrigerators, lee Coolers, Mason Frnit
.Jars, Jelly Glasses, Stone Jars.
GOLDEN RULE BAZAAR,
E. LOBE & CO., 9Qfi to 912 Front St.
11 Hull Furniture Company.
NEW HAT RACKS,
OPEN BOOK CASES,
CHEAP BEDROOM SUITS.
FRONT STREET. CONNER OF SPRING.
THE PLATE FRONT!
TO HOUBEK EEPERS:
If Ton are replenishing your Crorkfry, -x-e the Handsomest and Most Complete Uno of
I>et-nrated IMunerware over shown on the loaat, which we arp ««>l)tug in open *toot:
John Edward's Foreelaine. our own importation. Gold Handle, which we can
sell at half price of Haviland's China: Mereer China. Ri»vere Cres-sou and
Hamilton: Mcakin's Grey Washington: Grindley Rustic, and other patterns.
SEE 01R $llOO DINNER SET, THE BEST VALUE EVER SHOWN.
SCHADE, WOODRUFF & CO.,
Ilradquirlprii for Ma«on'n r. L. Krult Jars."Whnlr<*lf antl Retail.
BARGAINS IN FIKNITURE! S"
We will quotp von n few price*, vif:
Six Pieces Hardwood Bedroom Suit, $20.00 Foll-SM Woven Wire Mattress, $2.25
Fall-Sized Wool Mattress .. . 3.50 Carpet Patent Rocker 3.25
' 1l » r entire utook, -which i« complete, will h» xdUl on the abav«
pl.tn Ht the lowest priee««.
NEW ENGLAND FURNITURE COMPANY, No. 1,219 Second St.
S / n < HOOM of TH« Xortbwefi,
ll »5 YESLEIi AVE., SEATTLE, WASH.
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, THURSDAY, JUNE 4, 1891.
LACE CURTAINS
RENAISSANCE.
Finest made, per pair, SIO.OO,
$12.50, $15.00, $17.50, $20.00,
$25.00, $30.00.
BRUSSELS.
$12.50, $15.00, $17.50, $20.00,
$25.00 per pair.
SWISS.
SIO.OO and $15.00 per pair.
NOTTINGHAM.
In Ecru aud White, per pair,
$1.50, $2.00, $3.00, $4.00,
$5.00, $6.00.
NEWS OF NORTBWB.
______________ J**"*" "
The Pioneers' Clam Barbecue Is
a Great Snecess.
SIDNEY DILLON AT BOISE CITY.
Laughton's Indian Ennmerators Sot
Allowed on the Reservation.
A Northern Pacific Brafcemaa-Killed—
Fire In AitorU-Oeeeat Citisens of
Portland Parlfjlng the Omrsmcnt
—Municipal Scandal In Tacoma.
POST TOWNSEND, June 3. —{Special.]—
The Washington Pioneer Association ad
journed this afternoon after a pleasant day
'spent in an old-fashioned way. . The clam
bake was the biggest success of anything
of the kind ever attempted here. Jadge
James G. Swan had charge of the whole
affair, and the clambake was superin
tended by Queen Victoria and her two
sons, the Prince of Wales the Daks
of York, jr. The visiting uoncers are
loud in their praise of the day's
sport. The procession form >d at noon,
with the Key City band I,
N. G. W., at the head, followed by the
pioneers in line, and marched to Morgan's
hill, where the big clambake and afternoon
exercises were arranged.
The proposed laying of the corner-stone
of the new county courthouse, set for to
morrow, has been postponed till next
week, and the pioueers will not be able to
participate in these exercises. A majority
of the members of the association left to
night and the remainder will leave for
their homes tomorrow.
POKTLAND MUNICIPAL POLITICS.
Democrats Resist KiTort to Elect Honest
Non-Partisan Officers.
PORTLAND, June 3.— [Special.j—-The Dem
ocrats of Portland held their primaries
this evening, and elected delegates to the
city convention to be held Friday. It is
the intention of the party to place a full
ticket in nomination, notwithstanding the
movement on foot to place an independent
citizens' ticket in the field irrespective of
parties. This move is headed by the lead
ers of the consolidation crusade, and they
propose to weed out all the professional
politicians, and give the city a good set of
officials. The object of the move is to
break ring rule, and indications
are that it will be successful
even if straight Democratic and straight
Republican tickets are placed in the field
in opposition. The most prominent Demo
crats are not in favor of a straight Demo
cratic ticket, knowing that it will never
win, and believe tnat a citizens' ticket
would give them fair representation. They
are of the opinion that it is manipulation
of the Republican bosses to waken the
citizens' ticket and elecl the 1
ticket.
The Republican ringleaders hare noth
ing to say, and no meeting of the Repub
lican city committee will be called until
after they see the hand of the Democrats
and citizens' movements. Some think
that the Republican rn*ch'ne will indorse
a good citizen?' ticket - *-he election will
take place on the Wth, and politics are
already at fe?er heat.
TACOMA MUNICIPAL, CORRUPTION.
Private Horses Said to Have Been Fed
At the Public Trough.
TACOMA, .Tune 3.—[Special.}— A three
cornered light is in progress, the principals
being John Dieringer, formerly barn boss
at the city stables, the Evening News, and
several city ofieials. The city officials are
charged by the News with feeding their
private horses out of the public feed bin.
Dieringer, who furnished a part of the
criminating evidence and was subse
quently discharged by Street Commis
sioner Colin, who is implicated, comes for
ward with the accounts of the stable,
showing just how the public fodder was
disposed of. Mayor Kandie took cogni
zance of the Xew.i' charges, and ordered an
investigation. Dieringer refused to testify
at the first session of the investigating
committee, alleging that he feared the
city officials were bent on forcing unwar
ranted statements from him. He also
doubted the honesty of the committee's
stenographer. He will tell what he knows
tomorrow, and will have his attorney and
hi» own stenographer on hand to help
bridge over any possible pitfalls.
ANOTHER BLOW AT LAUGHTON.
Government Excludes HU Census Enu
merators From ColTille Reservation.
OLYMFIA, June 3.—[Special.]— A letter
was received at the executive department
this morning from 'Acting Commissioner
Bell, of the department of the interior, in
which it was stated that the United States
government objected to the taking of the
census of the Colville Indians by Messrs.
Gwydir and Keene, the commissioners ap
pointed by the late acting governor,
I.aughton, as it would hurt the negotia
tions now pending between the govern
ment and the Indians. For this reason
the census takers would not be permitted
to visit the reservation.
Portland's Welcome to General Veazey.
PORTLAND, June 3.— [Special.]—The G.
A. R. posts of Portland, assisted by the
Woman's Relief Corps and Sons of Veter
ans, gave W. G. Veazey, commander-in
chief of the G. A. R. f a rousing reception
at G. A. R. hall this evening. The hall
was crowded, and a great many veterans
were present to shake hands with the dis
tinguished guest. Mr. Veazey in an elo
quent address took occasion to refer to the
pension department and said that often
too much red tape proceedings worked
great injustice to deserving soldiers. To
morrow General Veazey will participate
in the deliberations of the interstate com
merce commission, of which body he is a
member.
Sidney Dillon at Boise City.
ROISI CITY, June 3.—[Special.Presi
dent Dillon, of the Union Paciric railroad,
and Messrs. Clark, and Dickinson, arrived
in the city today. They were met at the
depot by a deputation of citizens and
driven about the city. They expressed
themselves as well pleased with Boise and
vicinity. They left on a special train this
evening.
Ex-Governor Curtis is seriously ill with
typhoid malarial fever.
Suicide at Nantpa. Idaho.
BOISE CITY, June 3. —[Special.]— C. H.
Shields, formerly of Chico, Cal., suicided
at Nampa yesterday by taking one and a
half ounces of laudanum. No motive is
assigned for the deed.
Fire in Astoria.
ASTORIA, Or., June 3.—Fire broke out
this afternoon in Culbirth's paintshop.
The inilammabie materials ouraed rapidly,
and for a time • serious conflagration was
threatened, as a strong wind was blowing.
By hard work the fire depart ment confined
the flame* to the bcilding where they orig
inated. The heaviest loser is Wong Ho
Lung, a Chinese merchant. The total loss
xs $10,500, uninsured.
Boise Contractors Abscond With 92,000.
BOISE CITT, June 3.-{Special.]-Frank
Banting and George Gordon, painters and
contractors, abaoonded last SatUfday with
out paying their 'men and leaving many
merchants In the lurch. They were caught
at Pocatello, brought back and made to
disgorge. They had collected bills before
the Ist of the month, and had got away
with about $2,000.
A Northern Pacific Brakeroan Killed.
EILENSBUKG, June 3.—[Special.]—Brake
roan Burris was crushed to death while
coupling cars at Buckley yesterday. The
body was brought here by the Brother
hood of Brakemen, embalmed, placed in a
metallic casket and sent East on today's
train, to be interred at his home in Michi
gan. _
TH* KKTSTONB BANK FAILURE.
Comptroller Lacey's Defense-The Phil-
•delphla Investigation.
WABIUSGTO* CITT, June 3.— Referring to
the criticisms of his bureau in connection
with the Keystone bank failure of Phila
delphia, Comptroller Lacey said today that
as a matter of fact both the closing of
the bank and the appointment of a receiver
were ordered by the comptroller against
the wish of all who had sufficient interest
to express an opinion. There were many
reason s why it was desirable to avoid a re
ceivership, notably on account of its assets
being so largely in real estate. Hence the
comptroller deemed it his duty to aid in
several hopeful attempts to reopen the
bank by the contribution of new capital
under new and competent management.
As a matter of fact, it was offi
cially reported to the comptroller
that 1300,000 of new capital had been sub
scribed, and that the Lucas estate was ex
pected to make good all amounts due. Re
cent developments have shown that these
plans could not have been carried
out, but they were sufficiently promising
at the time to warrant the delay asked for.
Similar measures, Lacey said, have caused
the re-opening for business within the past
six months of at least four national banks
whose capital had become impaired, and
two more will open soon.
PHILADELPHIA, June 3.— Before the in
vestigating committee today, Peter Wide
ner emphatically denied that he had, as
alleged, unloaded $400,000 worth of Chicago
Traction stock on ex-City Treasurer Bards
ley. He had never sold Bardslcy stock of
any kind. The presidents of several na
tional banks denied ever having paid
Bardsley any money consideration
for city money deposited in their
institutions. Mr. Huyn, of the
broker firm of Glendcnning & Co.,
resumed testimony. He said that in the
course of a single year the firm's stock
operations with Bardsley aggregated
$1,250,000, and in the same time they bor
rowed $910,000 from him and loaned him
$250,000. Confidential Clerk Bean, of
Glendenning & Co., was plied with ques
tions as to how he came to go to Bardsley
to borrow money, etc., but to all questions
he returned the stereotyphed answer, "I
don't remember."
NEW YORK, June 3.— The New York Dis
patch Publishing Company is in the sher
iff's hands under executions aggregating
$44,175. The capital stock issl2T>,Uoo. The
company published the New York Ditpalch,
the Daily Traveler and Hotel Record, Drake'*
Magazine, and the Evening Call.
MARKHALI., Mich., June3.—The follow
ing notice appears on the doors of the City
National bank, of this city: "This bank
is closed on account of the defalcation of
E.J. Kirby, assistant cashier. John R.
Bentley, cashier." Kirby.it is said, left
Saturday, ostensibly for his former home
in Schoolcraft, and did not return. The
amount taken is not certain, but it is sup
posed it will be from $3D,000 to |.V),000.
Kirby was a prominent young married
man and had always been highly re
spected. It is rumored that he dealt in
wheat. Depositors will be paid in full, as
the stockholders are responsible as well as
Kirby's bondsmen.
BOTS THROW STONES AT HEAVER.
Kiuu City People Express Disapproval
of the Swinish Schweinfurth.
KASHAS CITY, June 3. —Two hundred
men and boys threw stones at the branch
"heaven" here tonight. When
Mrs. Ward, keeper of the place
and archangel to Schweinfurth, made
her appearance, stones came so danger
ously near her that siie beat a hasty re
treat.
The self-styled Christ came out and tried
to calm the crowd by pouring ora
torical oil on the troubled waters,
but they would not be calmed.
Then a young man ran up
the stairway and kicked him sharply on
the shin. The pretender gave a yell of
pain and ran indoors. One of his fol
lowers got out of a back door and
called for the police. Ton minutes later
a patrol wagon rolled up with half a dozen
bluecoats, and with a farewell pelt of rocks
the mob disappeared. Schweinfurth de
clares that he shall remain here for a
month.
Acquitted of Mnrderine » Striker.
SAN FRANCISCO, June 3. —The trial of
James W. Kerr, proprietor of the Occi
dental foundry, who shot and killed
Edward Cogan, an apprentice, in June,
1890, during the iron moulders' strike,
was ended today by the rendering
of a verdict of acquittal. The jury was
out only three minutes. Kerr claimed
that the shooting of Cogan was uninten
tional, and that it occurred while he was
endeavoring to protect the lives of himself
and employes from the attacks of other
strikers.
Fire in a Chicago Distillery.
CHICAGO, June 3.— The dry-room of
Schufeldt's distillery was burned early
this morning by lire, which threatened to
destroy the whole establishment. The loss
is roughly estimated at f'JO.OOO. The
fire is supposed to have originated from
an explosion of gases in the feed room.
Three employes of the distillery went in
with a hose to try to extinguish the tire,
but were compelled to retreat quickly, one
of them being fatally and the other two
badly burned.
Fate Swiftly Overtakes a Murderer.
BOSTOX, June 3.—A young German farm
hand, known only as "August," was em
ployed at Dedham by Miss Mary
Emerson, an aged maiden lady, to
do chores. Yesterday, for some
unknown reason, he murdered her and
fled. Early this morning his dead body
was found under the draw of one of the
Charles river bridges. He had evidently
hidden there, and when the bridge opened
to let a vessel pass he was crushed to
death.
Death of m I'nited States Marshal.
NEW YORK. June 3. —United States Mar
shal Lake, of Brooklyn, who waa injured
by falling from a train
morning.
DUMPNOGARBME HERB
The United States Posts Notice
on the Shores.
PAUPER IMMIGRANTS SHUT OUT.
Rules Established for the Entry of
Townsites in Alaska.
The Surveyor-Genef-al of thia State to
Appoint tho Purveyors Timber
Depredations on Paget Sound-First
American Steel Gun.
WASHINGTON CITY, June 3.—A plan pro-
by Assistant Secretary of the Treas
ury Nettleton for restricting immigration
has been approved by the president and
was today embodied in a circular letter
and sent to all steamship companies bring
ing immigrants to this country. It says
in part:
Evidently the disposition ol many steamship
companies, tinder pressure of sharp competi
tion. to gather yip In Euro|» and bring lo the
United States all who, with or without the aid
of others, can pay the cost of steerage passage,
regard Ices of their character or of the condition
of oar laws, compels on the part of thi* govern
ment closer scrutiny and the adoption of more
comprehensive measures.
As soon as possible ths sifting process should
be applied at the beginning, not at the end of a
journey. Much of this wholesome preventive
work can be effectively done by the transporta
tion companies directly and through their In
land agencies in Europe, and these companies
must be aware that their own pecuniary inter
ests, not less than the cause of humanity, will
be best served in this way.
Attention is particularly called to the pro
vision excluding persons likely to become a
public charge. Doubtful cases should be ex
cluded.
Inasmuch as some steamship lines, In order to
increase their carrying capacity, have recently
disregarded the provisions of the law requiring a
certain allowance of cubic air space to each
passenger, notice is given that hereafter a more
thorough inspection will be made of all steam
ships, and the penalties for violation of this
provision rigidly enforced.
The secretary of the treasury invites the co
operation of all interested parties in carrying
out a system of foreign inquiry that will facili
tate the work of the government officers.
Assistant Secretary Nettleton today di
rected the return to their countries of two
Italians and one Swedish immigrant who,
since their arrival in January, have been
paupers. Under the new law they can be
returned at the expense of the company
bringing them. This is the first order of
the kind issued by the treasury depart
ment, and indicates the vigor with which
the new law is to be enforced.
TOWNSITKS IN ALASKA.
Interior Department Issnes Rules to
Govern Kntry of Lands.
WASHIKGTON CITY, June 3.— [Special.]—
The acting secretary of the interior today
promulgated rules and regulations for the
entry of lands in Alaska for townsite pur
poses, in accordance with the provisions of
sections 11 to 15, inclusive, of the act of
March 3 last, to repeal the timber culture
laws and for other purposes. The rules
recognize the special deposit system
as to surveys. Authority is given
the surveyor general of Washington to
appoint a competent person to make the
survey, the latter giving a bond of $5,000,
and being held accountable for the proper
performance of the duty assigned him
and in this particular it does not require
the approval of department officials
ht re, as in other cases, owing to the great
distance.
Natives of Alaska are recognized the
same as citizens of the United States to
make entries. In all townsites entry is to
be made by one trustee only. In eaclf
town entries for manufacturing and
trading posts are limited to 160 acres,
and only to citizens of the United States.
In the case of companies or corporations
the alien land act is applicable.
The platting of the survey is to be
left to the hands of one trustee,
who is to approve or disapprove in each
town. In some of the towns, especially
Sitka, where a number of lots were con
veyed while the territory was under Rus
sian rule to citizens, the titles
are obscure, and the metes and bounds
indefinite. The government district
judge and marshal are to constitute a
board to settle all suits and disputes, as
well as to reserve such lands as may be
needed for the government of the United
States in conducting the affairs of the ter
ritory. Where lands are to be used for
manufacturing purposes the price is to be
s2."io per acre, and for townsite purposes
11.25.
Timber Depredations on Puget Sonnd.
SAX FRANCISCO, June 3.—A. B. Hall, a
special agent of the land office, is investi
gating several timber land frauds along
the northern coast and in several of the
lower Oregon counties. Writing of his
work to this city, he says that an immense
amount of timber thieving is being done
in Chehalis, Jefferson and Clallam coun
ties. There is in that section a consider
able extent of unsurveyed government
land. The thieves in question do not con
fine their operations to unoccupied
but invade land that has been
entered. The scheme of the wary logger
is to agree with the owner of a quarter-sec
tion to buy his stumpage. The stumpage
is then legitimately removed and the log
ger finds it easy to put a heavy fence
across the boundary line in the adjoining
quarter, cut down an immense amount of
timber in a short time, put it into booms
and tow it to the mills. An instance is
noted in one of the northern counties
where 350,000 feet of the finest kind of tim
ber was appropriated during the absence
of the legitimate owner, and it was *ll
done within one week. Agent Hall reports
forty cases of depredations.
First American Xwelfe-lnch Steel Gun.
WASHINGTON CITY, June 3.—The first
12-inch steel gun ever made in the United
States has been completed at Watervliet
arsenal and shipped to the Sandy Hook
proving ground for testing.
Purchases of Sllr*r.
WASHINGTONCITT, June 3.—The treasury
department today purchased 320,000 ounces
of silver, at 97.4 to 97.!* per ounce. The
offers were 1M4.000 ounces.
The Ct*r May Negotiate With Hirsch.
LONDON. June 3.—The Vienna corre
spondent of the Tiuies says that it is semi
officially announced that the Russian gov
ernment is disposed to negotiate with
Baron Hirsch in the matter of the trans
portation of the expatriated Jews to the
proposed Jewish colony which Baron
Hirsch intends to found in the Argentine
Republic.
Cora Law Agitation In Germany.
BERLIN, Jnne 3.—Rye has risen 6 marks.
The Fwwefce Zritung and other journals
advocate anti-duty agitation on the ground
TWELVE-PAGE EDITION.
that unless the harvest prospect* are un
expectedly improved the government will
be compelled to reverse its decision against
a reduction of duties.
MACDONALD OKADI ALLV SIKKIXfiI
No Marked Cfcaa** During Ik* Day
How the Party Will Be Reorr.nl ied.
OTTAWA, June S.—A bulletin at 11:30
says there has been no marked change
since morning, but Sir John Macdonald s
strength is gradually growing less.
Dr. Powell has issued a bulletin to the
effect that the public are demanding of
him more than he can give. While he has
no desire to elude, be declines to manu
facture information.
A prominent French-Canadian politi
cian who is considered an authority, says
that the cabinet will be reorganized by Sir
John Thompson, who will be premier and
minister of justice. Other changes will be
as follows: Minister of railways, J. A.
Chapeau; minister of public works, «. A.
Kirkpatrick; president of the council,
W. B. Eves; leader of the Senate,
Lieutenant-Governor Angers. He also
»*ys that the remaining portfolios
would remain the same as at present, ex
cept that some French-Canadian member
would probably succeed Chapleau as secre
tary of state, and that J. C. Carting would
probably retire from the cabinet to make
room for Meredith, the present leader of
the opposition Ontario house. Hir
Hector Langevin is to be made lieutenant
governor of Quebec, and Hir Charles Tup.
per will remaiu in his present position.
AS IXPASOVI MAN'S BLAIPHKMT,
Derohtln, Lecherous Tory Politicl**,
Ttlki About "the Lord" end "Ihityf."
LOBPON, June S.— -Decobsin, who Had
from Belfast on being chared with an un
naiuralj crime, has written the Conservs- .
tive elections committee that he does not
feel that the Lord points it oat to him as
his dnty to meet his accusers at the risk of
life and liberty, nor does he propose swear
ing against perjured ruffians.
The Pope Makes His Will.
ROME, June 3.— The pope has made a
will bequeathing all his personal property
to the holy see.
Terrible Storm In Vienna.
VIRUS*, June 4.—A fearful thunder
storm yesterday (Wednesday) destroyed
thirty-six buildings in this city. Light
ning struck and killed two children, and
many persons were badly hurt.
Touched Off by Lightning.
BERLIN, July 3. —Lightning today caused
a terrific explosion at Wasch <t Wishaus*
dynamite factory at Schleshusch, near
Solinger. Several persons were killed and
many injured.
A Hurricane In Italy.
Tv*i!f,*June 3.—' The wind blew a hurri
cane in Susa valley today. Many houses
were wrecked. Nine persons were killed
and many injured.
CONDEXSKI>~mBPATCHJCS.
Mrs. Barbara Frost, a widow, living la the
southern part of St. Louis, wu killed Tuesday
night by being struck on the head with a mass
of rock hurled by a blast from a quarry aUO yards
away.
James Haygood, the 17-year old son of a prom
inent citizen of Hlllsboro. ill., wss drowned
while attempting to save a comrade who was
overcome with cramps.
A sawmill six miles from Bedford, Tn«L, ex
ploded Wednesday morning, killing five men
and injuring three others.
The Pasile la Argentine.
BCENOH AYRZX, June 3.— The chamber of
deputies today passed s bill exempting
banks from legal process for a month. Tlie
Spanish bank has closed its doors, and the
English banks are affected.
DERIVATION Or FAMILIAR WORDS
The Monkey-Wrench, the Derrick and
the Stentorian Voice.
Harper's Young People.
Monkey-wrench is the name applied lo
a tool, a sort of spanner with a movable
jaw. Some etymologists account for the
forepart of the name by recalling the fact
that a monkey's jaw is morahle also.
The monkey-wrench was invented some
years ago by a poor mechanic whose name
is Charles Monckey. He sold his patent
for a song, and is now working for day's
wages in Brooklyn. His invention has
made millions of dollars for those who
were able to place it upon the market.
Derrick is the name of a crane used in
shifting and lifting heavy weights. It is
said to be so called from one Theodoric,
who, while serving at Cadiz as a soldir r
under Robert. Earl of Essex, was doomed
to death for some crime, but pardoned by
his commander o§ condition that he
would hang twenty-three other malefact
ors. Such are the revolutions of fate that
subsequently he was employed in Lon
don to behead Essex, the man who had
saved "his life.
A stentorian voice is that of one like the
Grecian herald in the Trojan war, whom
Homer describes as "great-hearted,
brazen-voiced Stentor, accustomed to
shout as loud as fifty other men."
A raglan is a loose overcoat with
sleeves, such as Lord Raglan wore in the
Crimean war. Wellington boots are named
after the Iron Duke. Bluchers are also
l>oots, named after the commander of
Wellington's Prussian allies at Waterloo.
Any magnificent tomb is called a mauso
leum. Mausolus. the Carian king who**
name it bears, had nothing whatever to do
with the original except to lie in it when
dead. The piety of his wife. Artemisia,
gave his name to the tomb and immortal
ity to her husband's memory, because the
monument she built over his body gave a
word to the language. The magnolia bear*
the name of Pierre M3gnol, professor of
medicine at Montpeliier, France, in the
seventeenth century; and Dahl, a Swedish
botanist, has his name embalmed in the
dahlia.
Indirectly our word dollar depends upon
a good man's name. The word is an
abbreviation of Joarbimsthaler, a coin
first minted about 1518 in the valley of Pt.
Joachim, Bohemia. The valley (thai)
bears the name of the saint. Boycott is a
word recently introduced, but already in
use everywhere. A few years ago Captain
Charles Cunningham Boycott, an Irish
farmer and land agent, angered his ten
ants, and in revenge they refused to work
for him or to sell him food. To boycott
means to withhold custom from a man in
any line of business. A martinet is what
few soldiers like to becalled. Colonel Mar
tinet was an officer in the army of Louis
XIV. He was so particrlar about small
details, so rigid in his discipline, that he
was looked upon as a nuisance. His name
has come down to us as applicable to a
military Miss Nancy Finniken.
Bogus is the corrupted form of the nam*
Borghese, that of a noted swindler who
passed large amounts of counterfeit mon»-y
in the West some years ago. Boniface is a
common name for the landlord of a tav
ern. The original was one of the rare
kind—a sleek, good-tempered, jolly land
lord—but he wasn't in real life. He was a
character in Farquahr's comedy of "Ths
Beaux' Stratagem," written in l*"?.
"My son," said the venerable man. ash*
sent his boy forth to do battle with ths
world, "select your calling, stick to thai
one thing alone and von will succeed."
The boy selected the calling of viilags
lawyer, stuck to It faithfully, and now he
is known for miles around as the beat
checker player in I'ik.e county.
Surccu la Life*
Chicago Tribune.

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