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The daily intelligencer. [volume] (Seattle, Wash. Territory [i.e. Wash.]) 1876-1881, January 13, 1877, Image 1

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THE DAILY INTELLIGENCER.
VOL. 11.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
t . H. HAX FORD.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
SEATTLE, W. T.
•fWCt-rWi!■!>>■ O «t- ,
V. ■. Warrs. L. B Sua
WHITE & NASH,
Ms WW W K ** j
NefttUe, Wuhiigtoi Terr'jr. |
OmOS,_DIHPATCH BUILDING.:
"* * I
0. M. IIBIW, LM. BALL. V. B. imm. J
UKIAIEC, MALI Jt ANIREWS
BIBUISIimUMUI
SEATTLK, W. T.
•• *• SSWSIiSS. >. L. lUKUV.
•ENHISON 4 ILANCNARB,
ATTORNEY S-AT-LAW AND
Proctor* In Admiralty.
•TO®#* at Port Tuviml, Wsealnftoa ''*rri
sr». mi
D P. JENKINS,
SEATTLE, W. T.,
A TTORNKY-A T-I.A W. SOLICITOR
IS CHANCKRY, AND PROCTOR
IN ADMIRALTY. mh2\
C M. BRADSHAW,
Jt tt •rmey-Mt-ijMw,
POET TOWN SEND. W. T.
H. B. HATHAWAY,
ATTORN EY-AT-LAW
WIU ftUaod lo buainoM in lU put! of lb* T*r
tllory. Firtlcnlir attention glv*n to Probata.,
MMw, Oullwtluti of D*MlMd Pay uienlof Tud.
HfcAT'lhK. W. T.
Jmu McMieaar. Jom LUIT
XcNAUGIIT & LEAHY,
A TTORSK Ys -AT - I.A W. 89LII 7-
TOIIS IN CHANCKRY. d PROC
TORS IN ADM IRA LTY.
Will prsotir* lo| |tb* Dlilrld Mid Bapnm !
Oi>arU, _ !
Mr. Imtt will (It* smcUl atUatloS lo 00l- •
|«ttOM, 4c.; iIM lo tbe pimh***
wd Ml* of Baal (state.
iaor tub. iut*. Jy" |
DR. J- LEAHY.
|r«fnwl> »u»ll Uf «• J" ? '
Vbotusou. Court FkyilcUi aa>l Sof*"#. London ]
OFFICE- rmaantbsl MutlU&i ror of Oom
urMli Htr**t.
HynintHH t-PrlJruUl Hotel JMm
DRS. k. ft H. B. BkGLEY.
Bemiropmlhint*,'
SEATTLE, W. T.
I\R H. S. SAOLKY. LATS PSOFKSaoS OF,
II Pvtadalss sad Pmcttr* <* tartan la the
MtrhlsaaOMtrsl Madlcal Collage. will tusks
OmtsTivs SargMT a»J Marginal IH*aaa*a a *r*clal
I jTand will etteaS »• calls la any part of the I
%>u*d. dl »
DR. G. A. WEED,
81' HURON AND PHYBICIAN,
SEATTLE. W. T.
DR.G.V.CALHOUN, <
SoatUo, W. V.
OSm %>. t. Dvmtefc ®ttiiau»f. Oc«l- 1
dootal
_ _ 1
Dr. J. S. Houghton.
D^i» («it ilmx l<> Of. Onw"' hx»im.
WtK'ttlv »u»»Uvm fiTMJ *>
AMUMB OF TttM FYS
DENTISTRY.
Dft J C ORAMK. P»m»T, or- [
anisMM*! HIMMVMMM
lag m H—mi" *»l rtrtlT AU worfc
J.S. MAGGS,
Dentist,
OFFICE. MILL STRKtT.
•r«r WJl* S tSRH , "a«^ T O nT
A. MACKINTOSH.
NoUry P«Mk —4 Vmitjmmttr,
Real Cutatr aa4 Tmi Agent. ,
MM • nbpMl AMnrt vrf TIU» *o *ll
iduiVuai; Will sltoaa »<» p«prk*» sa«
Ml* .<* l.*»>U > n
ill»atti« Mhl to Ttuif*
fymol vnm rtlNM(* •oll**-»sd»»J "•«»■
•ssiirsntu. _« •»• <*
inir -~"~*"
EtSTWICK. MORRIS I CO
Civil ud Mining
ww OIN 11 BUM
;m«a« So. «, Baru«i( * »IMM—J
(W.y.««»wUl M Wsifcli
g»»m«. wm*. ftiiowy.
C«1 •**•* «uwe»l U*4s M stfaes.
«s>»rt J iwlTtiii«rwt •TSSTS»t!S».«i»a fc-o*
The Unanswered Question.
j
BY ELillC BtBIUTT.
Some thirty year« ago an intelligent
utrciiu t and ship <>.vn» rot o;. of our
comrnerrUl citit-s put forth in * pamph
let f< rtij the 411 ration " Whst ii the
use of our navy r " Where th*r.» Mas
I one to a«k that queUion then, th»-re are
ath »ui«n l no*, ana neither then nor
now had one been found t > answer it.
Let it go again before th« jHlblie mind
i What is th-j use of mir navy *No one
' tiy it i* to raj>turj pirttes, or
! drive them from the aeas. Not um wf
! our war vessels i-> uiade for that pur
I puae. Is it to cruise around the globe
! to repel or avenge incalts to our flig or
I to our ritizeus residing iu foreign
coun'rus i Are. then, the utptains and
other officers of our frigates to be
judges, jurors and executioners in mat
ters of international law r or in cases
of alleged injury or insult, to execute
; drumhead justice or puuishment at
j their free will and sxjlc judgment ? to
j IK*uihard South Anu.rii .iu villages for
, ft quarrel over a l>ott!e of whisky or a
, game of ranis .' To vindicate the bon
or of our national flag. iudceu! llow
has it vindicated that honor in the
past'(
Well, it' we have no use for our navy
| iu time of pe ace, what is tbe use io
i war '< What was tbe use of the Great
French fleet of iron-clads in the late
war with Prussia ? Wtiat did they do
| tor France '< Did they delay her foil '<
i Did they win her any glory or defend
any of her ports* No; they never
| captured enough Prussian ship* to pay
for tbe COM I th«*y burned in cruising for
them. What is our navy going to do
iin casa of a war with a European
power* Enlarge tbe area of conflict,
as if this continent were not large
enough to tight on. Let us bring cool
reason to the appreciation of this con
tingency. As England is the greatest
naval power iu the world, and as our
navy has more reference to hers than to
all othett in the world put together,
let us leap with a hound over all pro
babilities luto the possibility of a war
with her. us »up|>ose that we
and she are going to take
the hack trsck toward tbe barba
rism of the dark ages; that not satis
fied with tbe result wbicb pacific solu
tions have realized iu tioth countries,
•be may do something to us or we to
ber, that cannot be settled by a Geneva
isilMIUMt, t • . • « w «
arbitrament of war, like that of IRI2, j
which settled questions so satistactori
ly (*) Well, war, let us suppose, is de- j
cla red. Wbat next '< Can any honest,
intelligent mind believe that England
alone, or with tbe help of France or
Germany; could or would send a fleet
of 50,000 men across the ocean and in
vade this continent v It would take a
whole week to land 25,000 ineu with
their armament, if no opposition were ,
made to them. It would take months
of preparation to collect ships of war
aud transports for such an expedition, j
The sub-iniiriue telegraph would give
us a morning bulletin of the operations
—the very number and names of the ;
ships and every other particular. We
should know the very hour when they
weighed anchor for America. What
would Ihj tbe result ir Why, 500,000
meu would or could bj concentrated at
any given poiut of attack on our coat
at two days* notice. What a preposter
ous fantasy to indulge, that any Euro
pean power or alliance would send over
50,000 meu to iuvade this continental
nation of 40,600,000.
But in case of this almost unsupposa
ble war, wbat would be the use of our
navy • It could not beat hack the great
fleet of Europeau ironclads. It could
not encounter tbetn on the high seas.
It would not be wauled to prevent the
iuvaoing fores from landing ou our
shores. Theu what r SJiue one mar
say it might scatter its ships over the
and capture the eneu.y's merchant
vessels, aud di-struy a great deal of its
commerce. But whose commerce would
it destroy* The word commerce is a
ooaapound one, beginning with the
word con "with.'' It don't uieau a one
sided transaction, but oue i«etween two
partus. Well, our >uppo*alde war i»
! with Englaud. aud mir uavy would de
stroy her commerce, w»<uld it' Who is
the <-<«* in tb« c**e. ami wbst m*kes the
commerce* The mo«t expanded o»i»
known to the Atlantic, connects Eng
land and th« Uaited states Cotton.
rk». tobacco, wheat, corn. pork. butter,
lard, etc . constitute our i«art »f the <v*.
or our eaports to BugUod. We «*ll her
more of raw aiatertal in the** produc
tions than she imi*>rts from all other
nations put together. Now, tlien, sup
pose in case >4 war *ith her hit navy
could destroy tbi* commerce, whicb
country would br the most damaged by
this destruction * Would it pay our
agncnltural States to support Mich a
o*tt tiftv jears in vie* <»t tha |*>*il>ili
ty of auch a war and such • destruction
of their product on their way
the sea* Certainly :t would damage
busiueas la Englatul much to preveut
the trade in the*- American pr\>lu.~tiotis,
hut would this weaken her. or tend to
bring the **r t,> * speedier clo»> I>ots
tins destruction ot j nv*te property
tend in that direction usualiy
Is it net time to *m>t this aimed
pea-o policy. whicn. like the dropsy,
grows t>V that it feeds on Ihu k liow
it hs«gro<* ii thi- l iti>u in the Is>t
twenty years, tr -ui f.'ti.UOU.OOO per a«-
num to fTO.OuO.O**)' Mtsll tbia
nst or. held m the protecting »ni,- of
tbe broad ocean. 3.W0 mil.* Ir ui the
nearest Kuropean power take it* chil
dren's !. it® children's toil* and ?»r..-
ings. a;»d liw them *» an ctetl*stmg
oi»sation to thi« impalpable h»bgoHim
that makes cow%rd» uf us al. - Willi t
svung generation t • succeed us attsia
to a bitter courage. and *h ike off the
huge vampire that fattens upon the in
, dustriee of the worid*
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON TERRITORY, SATURDAY, JANUARY la, 1877.
Ghost Stones.
I was born in a oountrj not ill-peo
pled with ghosts ; and gboata, as we sll
know, from the wrath of Patroelu*
downwards, make tbemselvee very use
ful to the poet. But here again I have
been unlucky. It was my mother's maid,
riot I, who beard tbe silks of a spectral
lady rustling behind ber late at night
in tbe long gallery at borne, and who
had not courage enough to turn round
and heboid the ghastly visage which
probably mirmounted them. Once, too,
MO old »bephevd came in from tbe
mountain valleys to narrate bow, 00 a
mid winter night, as he drove sheep
pasot a lonely farm, an old and saga
cioaa dog howled sad showed evident
signs of terror, creeping tremblingly
bark with it* yoaag comrade to bis feet,
tiefore his master's duller eye discerned,
as it soon did. with awe, a white woman
with a child in ber arms, doomed, as
she told him, for her guilt to vauder
restlessly aloug the wilds, and suffered
one night every year to appear and tell
ber story. .
But unluckily then I was too small a
child to be allowed to listen to his
thrilling narration, which surprised my
; father very much, for tbe nan was so
i ber and bad no motive for its invention.
I passed the boose near which this
strange meeting took plice, left unten
anted aud desolate for twenty years or so
in conietjuence, and I could not help en
vying my father's good fortune, who at
least bad seen the man who saw the
ghost. I have always remained one re
move further oft—a decided disadvan
tage.
That was my position when, on the
lovely lake of Hawcswater, a worthy
friend of mine told me how a man be
knew, once fishing at midnight, under
beautiful Wallercrag (where, it is well I
known, sleeps the imprisoned spirit of j
l the Viscount Lonsdale of George tbe !
Second's time), heard a crashing sound
; as if tbe whole mountain were Calling I
< dowu on him, and fled, smashing his
fishing-line iu the fall, and thenceforth i
j foreswearing fishing rather than run
the ris« of meeting tbe grim ghost,
which he thought was then breaking
its bouuds.
Those bounds were »et to it with dif- j
Acuity by a conclave of the clerw nf
the period, one of whom had pursued
it up the river to the lake whence it
hows, kuocking hii shins sadly against
the stones in its rocky bed, but still
tnanfulty holding fast to the Book of
Common Prayer, and reading from it
the passages which act as exorcisms.
When at last the spirit, so compelled,
showed symptoms of resting beneath
Wallercrag. the brave parson, jointly
with several of his reverend brethren,
iat°pPA4l , oA n tfui»C - 9l)lt in, »iA»l4 hul/
had laiu him
For ever and ever and aye.
But a voice from the mouutain-hollow
mockingly echoed back, time after time,
tiie spirit's ultimatum:
No, for a year and a day.
And how far tbe assembled priests
succeeded in making him desist from
his counter-proposition remains to this
day a little uncertain. At least my
llaweswater friend knew a man (you
see I never get any nearer to ghosts
than that),*wbo bad many a time heard
a carriage coming down tbe steep banh
ou which Lowther Castle rises above
the river of the same name, and held
open tbe gate for it at the bottom, as in
duty bound. But he knew well that
tbe carriage held an occupant who bad
no longer any business with this world:
and as he described tbe matter, "some
times his coachman and bis horsee had
their beads on ,lnit oftener they had
not " — HUickttood?s M tgazint.
Diseases of Our Own Causing.
On an average, one-balf of the num
ber of our patients treated by a hospi
tal-surgeon suffer from diseases due
primarily to a want of kno • ledge of
the laws of health and cleanliness. Ist.
Tbe ignoraace of bygenic laws, wbicb
atTect so disastrously tbe health of the
rich as well as the poor, exists chiefly
in regard to dress, ablution and venti
lation. This starement may, at first,
appear startling, but an enumeration
of tbe diseases that can be constantly
traced to tbe above causes will show
upon how sound a basis tbe statement
rests Tbe following are examples:
Varicose ulcers from dress, chest-dis
i eases and fevers from imperfect venti
lation Tbe vast number of uloerated
legs treated in out-patient department
of hospitals, in work-bouse infirmaries
and in private practios, arise from van
cose veins. Now. a varicase ulcer ii
called a distended coodition of veins oi
the leg. which base to sustaia the pres-;
sure of the blood caused by gravitation.
The most frequent and flagrant cause of
obstruction is in the ordinary elastic
garter Children thonld never wear
them at all. as the stockings can be per
fectly well kept up by an attachment
of an elastic band strapped to the waist
band. If garters are worn, it is im
portant to kuow how to apply them
with the least risk of harm; at the
bend of the kae« the superficial veins
' of the leg unite, and go dimply into the
under (art of the thigh beneath the
hsm-string tendons. Thus a ligature
' below tb« knee obstructs all tha super
-1 final seins, but. if the oonstmctioo is
| at»ove, the ham-string tendons keep the
pressure off the veins which rat urns the
Mood tr»xn the legs: unfortunately.
' m«*t people id ignorance oi iha above
f .cts. apply the garter below the knee.
' ~TK>*m<u Ihn J i* pcp'.fmr Srimct
1 Monthly
t
f Msr.y y»-ar» sg\>. in Lockpcet, Grao
t py JohnaMi. a colored lady sad Marly
- one hundred years okl. l«<ted up her
- fcKU'f and went out for a brief walk.
I S* n there was a fire alarm. Soon
a t >er» after a fnerui tan up to the o'd
e udy and sa d, "GraMy, Qraany' your
u is on fire ** Why, child," »id
e tie Ism •, with great sereaity. -dat i
- possible. De house is locked aa' I 'ss
got the key to de door in my pocket."3
-M ISC ELL AN EOTJB
STAR 1 ILLS
Cora* of
noiT aid nraci trams,
SEATTLE, W. T.
i I. W. BUJEBY, PrpY
EXTRA FAMILY
FLOUR
Always on hand.
GRAHAM,
CRACKED WHEAT,
and CORN MEAL,
GROUND FEED,
BRAN,
SHORTS,
MIDDLINGS,
and CHICKEN FEED.
B. L. TIOHI, j. M. SNOW.
«ty Surveyor. C. 3. Depot/ Surveyor
TBOMF & S\OW,
am hdreu An snvsrus
Seattle, W. v.
QfPfcw veer Gem SOAWA, E.itr<mre m Mill
Street.
Particular attention given
to the Survey of Lands in
King, Snohomish and What
com Counties, and the loca
tion of the Corners of Lots
and Blocks in this city.
Ballard k lisuer,
ImiiMW to Bofce»* -
Sash, duoks,
Blinds, and
Mouldings.
Specie! sttedtlon given to
SHIP WORK.
Factory Under Col man's Mill. I
•attle. Oct. a. '.ST 6 oltf.
Puet Sflßfld Soap Factorj.
C. NDRIHHON & CO,
Proprietor
Comer Main and Beoond Streets.
The very b*tt qoaltty of Family Sosp muni- ,
factored and for aale at Ban Frsncisc® factory ,
prices. Soap of all kinds mede to order.
SPECIAL.
Loggers and mill men should not fail toes,
aniioe oar Mew Skid Grease : it is better than oil
sad mack cheaper. On'jr X) Cents s Oallon.
af Farmers and merchants will Bad it to their
stf res togs to give as a call. «sp?tf
• .. _ _
3ITTU tiUUH HtlUI.
Mr. Angost Harms,
il nftfliaewl »nd Irst-rlaaa Wagon ud Ctr
rim ■»*" r*c«itly fn.n> WWxmld, hsrinc
Him4l Ovrtif* MtiilKiory nut |*p«lr Hkup
liMsaMtiot with Inuu'i blacksmith akop on
u moan, bottom iiui wasuxotoii
VMMt*■■•«aao*toUmyaMlc that tola pw
ml( all klcdi «#
CktUsm to of4er, and Repair
Hacks, Baggie* * Wagons.
OABBUOS TBIMKDia iSD fiRTBO DON*.
CtWWMdw immM. olTtf
Clark dc Eustis,
OOMRICTORS & HOLDERS.
QUARAXTRK FIRST-CLASS WORK
A T THE L 0 WEST RAI MS.
IBtf* • eonptH* ontat (•* r*Ma« t») wvnrinf
fcniMlMi will to —cb onien w.tfc
|iim|Tii I '
Front Street, opi«>»ita the Pa*ili«m.
aaSMJkvly
i hate leaked the
Brick Yard
E»ova m ta* TWhi for » torn of tor*
;«rt. vita tfe* Intmti— of
SVPPLYJSG THE &EMASI
At reduced rates.
WUI U H'HWd >0 ff* tooulf la Jaaa —rt
c. MCALLISTER.
li Iwl r,im aaOfc,
MISCELLANEOUS.
R. C. GRAVES,
IMPORTER A*D VtXLSXi I*
Willi T DIE
M mil ml » flag aaaoataMl
Bed-room Sets,
Extension Tables,
CHAIRS, WINDOW SHADES
«S«r.
I
Also kf«p« » &a« fttock of
Pictures, Picture Frames, 1
Mouldings, &c. I
Give ni« a caII idJ atUafy yoamelre* ut. j
priOM.
FRONT STREET, - Seattle, W. T. |
CRAIG ft HASTINGS,
Stone k Burnett Wharf,
SEATTLE, W. T.,
DMlm la
Grail, Hay & Faro Predice.
Goods received on storage
in Wharf Warehouse at re«-
annn
Forwarding and Commis
sion business promptly at
tended to.
Goods delivered and freights
collected.
All business entrusted to
our care will receive prompt
and careful attention.
Saddle-Hook
CHOP HOUSE,
Open all hour* of the day anil night,
at which the
BEST OF FARE,
On the shortest time, can fcs got o* ths most
reasonable cash terms.
F-tmilUi mjflittl with Oyitrrt at « r »0
Cent* per 1(»0.
Van Wie & Knudaon,
Blf-tf Commwiil B«*ttl«, W. T.
PU6ET SOUND STONEVARD
1 AfflLa JF» ' *-*■" 1111^1%
j II tie PhlsT %tfwi Street, IEITTLK
l«rj wWI «* Oww—7 Wytwaaatei to
j HmrU* aa4 all otlwc ,«HlillH
dltMi'h
Ato. 11l kinds of HwnM BmiWmiUtmiaXtot*
1 for Iht ntrlH.
Also. i|Ml for th» a»l« of Ibt S»# U«».
AU orxicn promptly ftU«d. Hd atttrfMttoa faar ]
j ittMd.
THE STATE INVESTMENT
ASD
! INSURANCE CO.
! pire efts Marine.
Cash Assets, - - $480,000.
! Principal Office. 10. 400, California Bt.
Inn Frmneiie•.
1 frru Do-**«r». hWt. A. J Bmawt. Tit*-l*r.
H OWIIM. Bee-retery.
A. P. HMAUW, « ti««««%l *l«tl
(of3tM*' Va *" ln ' r,llliß '- onvuß
rtUT-CUM KI&IB SOLICITED
C. C. Perkins. A*ent.
■. o. v. r.

SUTK MUICS
• WSDSBSDAI
: S?UIJ:O •» moc*e*,
"tetaßataL ftrvttai It allaA.
1 " IA
MISCELLANEOUS
Crawford & Harrington
IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS
sEA. T T JL. E, w. X.. .
| Hare on hand a large and well assorted stock of gOOcflH
their line, consisting of Foreign and Domestical
Hardware and CuUeifl
j Iron and Steel, assorted, 1
Blacksmith and Carpenter Tools. aj
Agricultural and Mining Implements
Crockery and ftlassware, Paints a 9
llemp and Manilla Cordage, Groceries and Provisions, Wfl|
Liquors, Etc. . ' *||
AGENTS FOR THE# '
FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY OF LONDON, 4|
or talbot coal, for city trade, for WHA|m
CRAWFORD & HARRIGTOPQ
SRattle, W. T.. j u i y ut. ISTS.
| VERDICT ALWAYS FOB THIS il
DM TESTICLE FEHj
SEWIH6 MiCIMtl
The Centennial (iold Modal and Diploma ifl
The Seott Modal, lfl
The Franklin Institute Medal ll
The Be port oi the Centennial Commission ssts : " Th« davk aa^|
t))a nutwit nnrn .
rang«> of work.
W« claim aalea UNPRECEDENTED, aud aatiafactioa UNIVERSAL In 1U couatractloa tt Jfl
from ALL others, «ndia equalled by none. Ah an earnest c>f what la here dittoed, tha
an CHALLENGE all utbera to a friendly content, either for atuuaement or for a mora
CONSIDERATION. Th« Family Machine in li«ht running and eaaily comprehended ; haa an
loua devlca "to take up" h>at un«tl"ii or weir, whii-h, to a niachiniat. ia prcof of
Thia Machine haa tweiTrd more MMal* an>t com|iilnif-ut«r\ Textinionlala than My other la
length of time. cfS
AGENTS WANTED IN ALL UNOCCUPIED TERRITofI
El ||A| I A e ent for M
mbi Washington Tcrriffl
CHERRY STREET SEATTLE, W»
Seattle Brewery J
CORNER MILL & FOURTH STREETS, SEATTLE*
SLORAH & CC|
Proprietors, and Brewer® ofl
SUPERIOR ALE, PORTII
And the only J
Genuine Lager Veil
Made in Washington Territory. j
Our Bottled Ale and Porter is equal, if not smM
rior, to any foreign brand. *j
Chilberjs; Brothers*
WHOLESALE & RETAfI
DEALERS IN PI
Choice Groceries^
At>'l kr+T' f-tuiUatly ' n hm.J
IBECHCiTY Fill II UAL EYE HUk HOIIUT 111
Rice Flour, and Feed* §
AItKJ * w«ll iwiwt**! »tk of ___
Crockery, Glassware, & Table CutM
WhVh ti.ty to tri; t l,«»p»r tb*n *ny <Ah*r bona* in InNli.
FROST BTREET, BEATTLB, W. T^lj
HALL Sf PALLSOF
t>ir< r« of kii'l la ,
Cloth. Bra k , iug & FraiiMH^
ets, Perambu- g
lators. Etc. "fH
' Our facilities are such a# to defy competition. JjjM
GIVE US A CALL AXDjsATItiFY YOUH&KLW A3 TO PRICJ^m■
Cermffltl ttMt, Mfl*' W.T.
NO. 32.

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