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The daily intelligencer. [volume] (Seattle, Wash. Territory [i.e. Wash.]) 1876-1881, September 10, 1877, Image 2

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DIILV IVTELLIIiEMER.
BT
DA VI. IIKiGINS.
County and City Official Press.
Monday, September 10, 1877.
FEATURES OF THE PRO
POSED SCHOOL LAW.
The last Olympi* Standard publisher
a draft of the new school law which it
is proposed t<s introduce in the coming
Legislative sesiion for adoption We
have cursorily glanced through the doc
ument, and observe that in "owe of its
features it is an improvement over the
elaborate common school Uw of Cali
fornia; no'ably in this item that it pr<-
scril>e« a« the common achool curricu
lum simply the studies of Heading,
Writing. S|»eliing. Arithmetic, Geogra
phy, Grammar, Phjiiology and U. S
History; instead of mixing up a hete
rogeneous ollapo Irida to b»> forced down
in city academies a*id backwoods schools
alike, consisting of music, drawing, al
gebra, zoology, constitutional law, etc , j
etc.
The following are among the provi
sions "1. A Territorial Suf*-rintendent
to be appointed i»y the Governor con
jointly with thft L-gisUture, holding
office two years, required to travel and
once in two years make a report to the
Governor relative to the affairs of the
I'niveraity and the statistics and condi
tion of the public schools; salary
a year, besides traveling expenses not
to exceed year, and an allowance
for stationery, |>oi<tag«, etc.; -ay #I,OOO
per annum in all, to b>i paid out of the
Territorial Treasury." We takecxi-ep
tion totbc provision making it. a pa'tof
his <tutj to go about delivering addresses
to public assemblies "on sc.l jects per
tuning t'> public schools;" —as that is
rather forcing matters ll« can reach
everybody at lens expense through his
periodical r<-yort, whieli should be an
nual instead ot bicunial. We should
bo in favor too of his election directly
by the people like other Si »t« officers,
instead of bring appointed, (at no time
specified; by the joint council of Gov
ernor and Legislature.
2—''A Boird of Education of three,
one for each ju itci il district, elected by
the people for a term of six years
arranged that one goes out every two
years; who shall hold meetings twice a
year at the cspit&l; the Superintendent
presiding exojtit w, first Monday of April
and Uctublr, to hold examinations and
grant Life Diplomas to teachers and
Territorial certificates good for six
years; also, certificates without exam- !
illation to teachers presenting certifi- !
catcs of like grade from other States."!
It is to bo their prerogative also to pro
vide a uniform .'ystem of text-books for
the ceuimou schools. This matter of a
uniform system of school bonks and
their change from time to time is the
most perplexing question iu thu wh le
business, and lias been on* of the most
grievous abuses under which the people
of other States have suffered. We pur
pose to take up this particular branch
of the subject for discussion hereafter.
3—''lu addition to Lift" Diplomas and
Ti-rritori.il certificates for nix years
given t»y the Territorial Board, each
County Superintendent, associating
with himself two first-grade teachers as
an examining board, shall hold a session
during the annual county Teacher*' In
stitute, for ex .mintiig applicants for
teacher's certificates, and way grant
county certificates of first gra>!•» goad
for live years, ami of second grade good
for one year, holders of first-grade ccun
ty certificates being eligible for Terri
torial Life Diplomas; but the county
superintendent may at any time grant
to any person a permit to teach, who
could not attend tbe Institute, good uu
til the next session of tho Institute "
This part of the bill is a humbug. In
the first place, sessions of the county
examining b>ard should l>e quarterly.
Secoudly, there should be un exact ex
amining system with uniform prepared
examination papers issued by the State
Hoard; examinations to be written and
oSioial, with an established scale of
credits of which not less thau 60 per ,
cent, should bo required for second;
gradocounty, 75 for first grade county
and 80 for Territorial certificates;--so
as to exclude slouches and subterfuges
from the business. Teaching ought to
be made a profession, the most select
and thorough going, and the best paid
in the State. Mixing up examinations
with the business and diversions of the
Institute is bad.
4. The whole of chapter ("Title")
IS should be struck out. It is absurd
to throw upon any district board of
School Directors and their clerk, the
burden and exjwnse of tax leviers aud
collectors, wheu ail the cumliersome
niachiuery for that arduous business
is already in existence. The county
assessors, treasurers and sheriffs can
just as well perform all the duties of
raisiug the necessary school revenues
along with those tor other purposes, as
to lead the school officers with such
functions. The bill stipulates that six
mills on the dollar shall be the regular
school levy. As school-houses must in
built, repaired and improved from tirnr
to time, let an additional two mills be
added regularly as a sehool building
tax, and collected with the other county
taxaa, and kept as a regular fund to be
tfcbomd under supervision of tho
Director# for such purj.oses, bT vote of
the householders of the school district
If two mills would not create a suffi
ciently large sum let it be mare.
5 In the contemplation of the bill
no discrimination is made !>etween wo
m-n and rn-±n. whether in respect to
holding school offices or voting, th ugh
only payers of school tax r m vote on
subjects involving property Correct.
6. County Superintendents are al
lowed $lO pt-r annum for each school
distrit t visited, with the same milage as
the sheritf. besides an allowance for
stationery, report blank- postag--, etc
This would give the King County
Superintendent only $2lO brides the
incidental appropriation and mil* age.
He should also have at lea-t $"200 a
year as compensation for his other
necessary duties. However, in our Ter
ritorial condition it is very difficult to
frame a systematic school law, as it
ought to Ik-, because there is no school
luiil of any consequence to in ike any
suitable provisions out of. Hence
aries the principal argument against
the whole bill. A-< long as we remain
a Territory we are nothing. When we
become a State, our changed circum
stances will require changed arrange
ments throughout.
7. The provisions in regard to thor
ough and regular school reports, reg
isters, and census and publication of tee
same, are good
8. "Every district must keep a school
at least three months every year, or re
ceive no money. County superintend
ents who fail to make an annual rep rt
in September to h?al quarters, with
complete statistics, etc , shall fori it
SIOO of their salary, and teachers who
f:til to submit to the directors a correct
regi-ter for tie* year or the term, shall
forfeit one month's salary." We think
teachers eught more properly to report
directly to the county superintendent,
instead of the directors whose duties
jieitaio more especially to the iiiaaage
ment of property and funds, than to the
routine of instruction.
0. "In every town of 4'io people every
child between 8 and 10 years old shall
be obliged to attend school at least six
months iu each year, except in a few
specified c.iM-s of justifiable exemption.
For a violation of this provision, the
parent or guardian shall be liable to a
fine of s.i to S'JO for each offense. Any
child within the Hge of eight and six
teen years, who shall be found away
from home, or idling about the streets
during school hours shall upon com
plaint, trial and conviction before u
Justice ol the Pence, be fined ten dol
lars and costs, or imprisonment not
more than five days in the county jail
The officer making such arrest shall re
ceive » fee of two dollars, to be in
cluded in the costs of the case. It shall
be the duty of the school Directors to
prosecute any offense occurring under
this ad, and any Director neglecting to
proseeufe for such offense within ten
days after a written notice has been
served on him by any tax-payer iu said
district, shall be liable to u tine of not
less than twenty nor more than fifty
dollars."
There is • good deal of cru lity about
the draft of the bill as published, mid
it should be boiled down.
44 PUNISHED TWICE FOR THE
SAME OFFENSE."
Such was the remark we several times
heard shortly after the hearing and dis
missal of a motion, made in the District
Court on Saturday last, to set aside an
execution sued out by the District At
torney and levied upon the property of
Val Wild man, who was convicted about
a year ngo iu the same court, ou a
charge of conducting a lottery in this
city, and fined #l5O. Upon default in
paying the tine, it will be remembered,
he was committed to jail and there kept
for fifty days, the full time provided by
Statute, owing to the amount of fine
imposed.
While his prosecution and puuisli
ment iu the first instance might be jus
tified by a rigorous construction of the
law, we regarded the Utter as an un
paralleled case in judicial proceedings,
iu view of the fact that he was sub
jected to trial and imprisonment for
having conducted a business which had
bee* legalized but a few months before
(or was supposed to be) by an act of the
Legislature of this Territory, and was
also operating under a special
permit or license granted him for that
purpose by i-ur County Commissioners,
in accordance with the provisions of
that Act. Iu that opinion our best cit- '
i«*ns concurred, and white WiMmau
*»» thus in durance vile, he had the j
putdic sympathy; and now, after hav. j
ing suffered a long imprisonment for
that offense which, in view of all the
facts, should have had meted out to it
only a uomiual fine, he ha*, since this
effort to make him pay that $l5O, a
still greater sympathy—a sympathy
that is evoked by the supposition
that it is not only unjust but an at
tempted oppression. But, iu view of
the law Wiring upon the case, w«
regard such a supposition illy-founded,
aud find no ground for censure towards
either the Judge cr District Attorney.
However great a hardship it may be
to Wildman.or unjust it may seem, they
did what the law required It says:
"If any person ordered into cus
tody until the fine and costs ad
judged against him, shall Dvt. before
the final adjournment of the court, pay
or cause the payment of the same to lie
•eaared, the clerk of the court shall
i«sue a warrant tn the sheriff, command
ing him to imprison such defendant in
the county j til until such fine and co«t
are paid or rented, until he has been
imprisoned in such jail ov.e day for
every three dollars of gjcb tine or cost;
but fJtf'tti"it inny at nn\j time i-c'it
n-jiirmt the ] roj*rty of the «/< v:< taut, a*
in other ca*e*.
«
"V\ hen a defendant is commits i to
jail ott failure to jay any fine <.r co- f s,
if there be no such jail, hi- "shall, uu l*>r
the order of the County Com 1111-doners,
work out the a menu, t of such fine aid
costs at the rate of three dollars for
each day's labor, and if there Im> a emu
tv jail he may e'frt to >l<K and in ca-e
lie-hall so work out hi- tine and costs,
no execution shall is-ue therefor "
These sections of the Statute seem to
be sufficiently explicit to warrant us i
saying that there can be no fault found
with the District Attorney or Ju3ge in
this latter proceeding, (and we not
withstanding our being at variance
with the iatter, i for the Attorney did
what was his duty—although he might
have «hirk(d from it,—and the Judge
dismissed the motion to quash
the writ because he could not
consistently do otherwise; neither
could he disturb the judgment in
that case by remitting the fine—as
at one time he might hive done—for at
this hearing he had no more control
over that judgment, in that respect, tl an
we have. Possibly the Governor n.ay
ba empowered to remit the ti o but
not the Judge.
TELEGRAPHIC.
Exclusively to the
IKiIL 1* f.r-Tfi£f,fCE»«7 -Kit.
THE ONLY NEWSPAPER
Receiving Dispatches
IN* WASHINGTON TERRITORY
s;i
LONDON, Sep. B —A correspondent
with the RusMan army Lovatz tisus
describes the late battle: The artillery
did the most of the lighting until eight
o'clock A. M , when thu wing
made a rush forward and the musketry
tiling became very heavy, the Turk
pouring a heavy rain of fire over the
Russian parapets. At 810 o'clock A.
M. two regiments ot infantry were
ordered up to assist the Tirraileurs of
Dobrudcha. Even at this early hour
the heat is intense. One officer out rtf
these regiments and a hundred men
have fallen by the wayside overcome
by the heat. At 9 o'clock the rifle 1 lire
increased in intensity, and is extending
further up I'he Osma Tirailleurs aie
sweeping the Turks deivn and our guns
opened a heavy fire to tha infan
try in their onward movement. At
9>50 a Novinskijo regiment wades
through a little swale behind one of the
Turkish redoubts, and the regiments
named utter the German E.npcror
moved upon the other. At 10 o'clock
good news arrived from the regiment
the Turkish position having been taken
on that front and the Russians are mas
ters of that positioj. They must now
take the isolated ridge called Mount
Rous, which overhangs Tavatz and
forms the western key of the position
With this iu their possession Lovatz is
theirs, and there remains only the ridge
redoubt forming the western key. At
10:30 the filing has ceased upon the
right, the Turks having tied across the
valley leaving Dobrovolski unopposed.
Gen. Sk»beluff has gone with ten bat
tallions to the extreme left to take Mt
Rous, the isolated ridge. At 10:30 a
pattering of musketry on the left tells
ofSkobebfFs advance. At 10:10 his
column is seen moving down the slope
of the amphitheater ami crossing the
little valley intervening between the
slope and Mt. Rons. The Russian's ar
tillery now opeusa tremendous shell tire
upon the slope* of Mt. Rous, facing Sko
bcloff, and the Turks are seen running
from their entrenchments en the top
nnd slnpo of this mount. At the foot,
however, and near the rear of the high
way they hold their ground and tire
rapidly upou Skobeloft • advance. The
heat is now actually frightful and it
seems impossible for wn to tight under
it. A regiment from the reserves
moves down in a defile to the right of
headquarters to take Mt. Rons in the
flank and cut of the Turkish retreat.
At IP. m a battery moves up to the
suppwit of this regime! t and takes a po
sition on the ic.ad leading along the
eastern end of Mt. Rons In a few min
utes Skobeloft s column rush up the
road and tak« the heights of Mt. R.>u»,
and he crowns them with his infantry.
The garrison of Turkish butteries away
to our left, on the Trokan road is now
withdrawing towards the Trokan river
taking their artillery with tin in At
one i'. M. we have taken all the Turkish
positions except the redoubt on the
Plevna road, the strongest of all, for it
command* the little valley at the bot
tom of the amphitheater, and has out
laying breast w»rks to flunk an attack
ing force. The first portion of the
battle has now terminated, and orders
are given to advance our batteries to
the top of Mt. K.'iis, and the right
right wing advanced carefully forward
toward the foot »f the amphitheater
slope, so as to be in readiness for an at
tack uputi the redoubt. The commander
of this position removed his gnns to tke
height at the back of this redoubt, an
indication that he believed that capture
of this fortification a foregone conclu
sion aud therefore withdrew his guns to
prevent them being taken, ll is quee
tientble whether the Turkish officer did |
weii or ill by hi« men in forcing tfcera |
to dtfei.d the last position after the
stilus had been removed in safety.
LONDON, Se;»t. B —A correspondent it
Pr-din s»v«, under date of Sept. sth:
I arrived here last night from Lovatz
When I leit •» h-»vy force of Turks were
on *>i- rovl northwest "f I.nvatz. and
art. . it: y and it:f vi try fire was going on. ;
The Turks may have been re-inforced
from Plevna, which arrives too lttc, <ir
Ostntn Pisha way be sending troops to
kt t p open the Hue of retreat to Sophia.
Prince Ch*rle«. of Rouniania is here in
command »f the Russian line facing
Plevna There -ire two divisions of the
R ntmanian miuv here.
ROME, Sept k —lt i> report*d that;
the Pope's health is not so good *s it,
has Veen for $• me time past His limbs
are parahzed, but there is no imme
diate danger. He resumed an audience
on Thursday.
EUROPEAN DRAFTS. —Drafts issued
at lowest rates on Qrext Britian, Ire
-1 Hid, Germany. Russia, France, Norway
and Sweden. Tickets to and from
Europe sold at lowest rates by Andrew
C'bil!>erg. Seattle, W. T.
1-0" is ths spot, wlure good
oysters are got?" asked old ilr Sweet
brnr. "Down at PIPER'S, of course"
r--plied Miss Angelina Honeysuckle.
I'UKE M i i.-i CoflVe lor sale cheap at
Chilberg liius
NKW ADVERTISEMENTS
I'lilLlllßMOMt NOTICE
\ LT. MEMBERS WISH IXC. TO RETAIN
. \ their Membership in the C'h> rai Society, are
requested tc be at the meeting THIS (Mou ay)
EVENING at the Y. M.C. A. Hall, at half-past 7
o'clock. (Impoitant business.)
ti-plu-lt By order of Rj»rd.
TO 01 R FRUADS.
Mr. SUE. OF orit FIRM, GOES BELOW
on the next steamer to purchase cur Fall
and Winter Stock of Goods We have gome ac.
counts standing several months, for the payment
of which, before the I'.tli of this month, we
>:iouM feel tiuly grateful
sepld-2w Pl.\K : f.\" .WE.
FOR RENT.
\ COMFORTABLE DWELLING HOt'SE—4
. A Rooms and au ('p.«tairs. beside Barn, stable,
She.ls, Well and Cellar—on Weller street. Rent,
f<; per month. The cheapest house in the city.
Apply at Cavanaugh's Mill. sepß-dtf
WATCHES
Jewelry,
MUSIC !
W. 6. Jamieson
I
OccipM Two Brick Stores,
Cor. Commercial and MillSts.
KOLD & SILVER WITCHES
JEWELRY,
(LOCKS, SILVERWARE
SPECTACLES.
Rsf WATC HKS A .11: WK! V
REPAIRED I.y FIRBT-CL\>S
WOK KM EX.
l*ru-fs for CJout]* ai,d \\ ork, the
LOWEST in the city.
Having disjt>sed of my Sta
tionery Department, and eouverted
the same into a
MUSIC STORE.
I am prepared to sell for CASH, or
on easy installments,
SQUARE & UPRIGHT PIANOS,
STANDARD ORGANS,
Accordeons, Violins,
(•uitars, Sheet .Music.
A3ENCY OF
mm sEWiMi MimiNEs.
PIANOS, ORGANS AND
MACHINES, FOR RENT!
Parties desiring to purchase
any of the al>ove goods, w ill find it
to their advantage to call or write
us a» we c an offer li tter terms than
an\ other bouse in our line.
U. G. JIMIESOY
WATCHMAKER, JEWELER
AND ENGRAVER.
MISCELLANEOUS.
HUGH McALEER,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
Stoves, Tinware, Copper
—AND
a s-: arjr a ,
GRANITE IRONWARE. WOOD AND WILLOW-WARE.
Particular Attention Paid to General Jobbing
and Tin Hooting.
ORDERS l>ROMrri.\ ANI) SATISK\< T<«K!LY FILI.KD. .5^3
COMMERCIAL STREET. - - SEATTLE. W. T.
SODA WATER, 37! cts. per doz.
HOOT BEER, 37! els. per doz.
( )V* C '™ l A .T K „ nipnovi VI srs IN ' SOPA w v rrn APrARATt s. an*p Bt yixg out
I t Snpplle* '<» CASH in the CHE*P*ST MARKET, we hive greatly reduced the price of on
Manufactures, and hasten to give our patrons the ben. fit. 1
Our Terms are : Casli on Delivery.
Yearly Contracts Wade at the Above Rates.
a-: v :ar bsb«o«. 9
"■ Seattle Soda "Works.
SEATTLE STOVE YARD !
JOHN KEEN AN 4" Also f""'»sbcs Stone
j-XL fur Building Purposes
i I 1 I=l Collieterj W,„k „f.ll
TVTAT?/RT.T ?f MM. ki~u««.u.i. ail,-.
I -:j ders.promptly filled and
Uli\iniFVh f k iil &£ B:4ti^ctio » *»ar:i..t W d
iflUll I. Jl fi.l Ik ,<■ V -'y*
uriHi'rnvre «' 11 "" ,r; 11
lILiDN 1 lIAhS BCr,I,Uon of wlmt thc *
/±-_ jfl eu;i have Designs.
- AMU - f '/J i . J~ ---l'riees, etc.. sent to tlietu
r B«ohm: * a= toebne-e fioni.
.V an*-
Shop on Crawford & Harrington's Wharf. Seattle, W. T.
Sep4-dtf
BEAN & McCALLISTER,
FRONT STREET, NEXT DOOII TO COLI'MIUA,
DEALERS IN
FAMILY GROCERIES,
im a®
LOGGING CAMP SUPPLIES!
HAMS, BACON.. LARD. AND SALT FISH OF ALL KINDS.
STWDARD sr IIOOL_ HOOKS ! SPECIILTY !
BROWNING'S CHEESE AT JOBBING RATES !
A full supply Of LIME an l PLASTERER'S MATERIAL
always on hand. au22-dtf
INSURANCE AGENCY!
—OF-
H. W. ROWLAND,
b-j -msmrrmr'W ' K
REPRESENTING:
Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York j People'# In#. Co. of Newark, N. J.;
Continental Fire In*. Co. of New York New Orleans In*. As«o'n, New Orleans;
Atlas Fire Insurance Co. of Hartford ; j St. Paul F. A M Ins Co of St l'aul;
Franklin Fire Ins. Co. of li diananolis; ; Revere lire Ins. Co. of Boston ;
Girarl F &M. Ins. Co. of Pnila<lelphia Union F. & Ins. Co of Galveston ;
Home Fire Ins. Co. of Columbus, ().; j Commercial Union, of London.
o
Capital Represented, $100,000,000 !
ipMtwtf
FINE WHISKIES^
NOW IN STOCK :
J. H. CUTTER,
ESSENCE OF OLD VIRGINIA
UNITED WE STAND,
MONOGRAM,
OLD HICKORY,
OLD GOVERNMENT.
ALSO, TO ARRIVE. DIRECT FROM LOUISVILLE, KT.,
One Car Load Standard Brands!
ALSO, IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC
Wines and. Brandies,
EN GLlsn ALES tfc I'ORTERS,
FULL STOCIv—FOR SALE AT SAX FRANCISCO PRICES, P.Y
Crawford &Harrington,
COMMERCIAL STREET SEATTLE, W. T.
HOTELS, i,-.
SADDLE-ROCK
CHOP HOUSE,
0i "'""" 1,0 «
bkst of fare.
OT. the tin,,. o»n b, M on
re&fotitbl* i-Mfi terr.m ,8, * 1
ir j ( \ o{/l . ert
Cents )*r 1(.0. *
V. w. VAX WIF
»p»-d;f CVmmrrcUl Str«*t, 9c«u» ilr \
OYSTERS'
OYSTERS ! '
FROM AND AFTER rills DATE
HILL 151' SERVED IX
A No. 1 Style
PIPER'S SIUOS!
FRONT STREET TU3I
THE
MAISON DOREE
wrmui!
COMMERCIAL STREET, SEATTLE
Every Delicacy the Market Affartj.
Fresh Oysters a Specialty!
OPEN DAY AND NIOHT !
JACOB KNUDSEN,
"•l't Proprietor
IE VXK i:\(iiA\(ii:
RESTAURANT.
rpHK T NDF.nsrONEO H.WF, KE OPENED
1 DIP Kank Exchange Restaurant. and *rf pre
pared to serve filHtouient in a first-olins »tjl«.
OYSTERS in every style at 25 cts- a dish
MAN I EL «fc MILTON,
Proprietor!.
Washington street, opposite Tribune o#<■«.
jjrii
gew gngland
■n«i* r nri:n, i
rorner Coiiimm-ial & MhiuPN.,
Soattlo, W, T
THE NEW ENGLAND^.
ami if a accommodations for families are unsur
passed.
This Houae in NEWLY BriLT, 1( HARD FIX
ISHKI) throughout, ban large and well f anklihe*
Rooms, au<l tirst cla*« board, on the
European Plan,
can be bad at moderate prices.
Best Hotel" In Hi" 'city.
L. C. HARMON,
ml-tf. Proprietor.
American House!
First House Above the Steamboat Landing,
SEATTLE, w. T.
' I HIS HOI'HE 18 THE MOST COSVKXIIHT'
I ly located ot any in the city, being at tba
bead of Yesler's Wharf, where all iteam«r»
and depart,
Board anil Lodging, per week J* "
Board. per week 4 "
fe-'fi HALEY & MoGKAW, Proprlstort.
For Sale Cheap
-OR RENT.
A House with Three Rooms
and Pantiy and Lot!
A Ooo«l Wrll of Water and Garden.
App y to
I. B. MOOR*.
»»p? Third Stmt Grocery
V ATS FOR SALE !
A T the north pacific uREWtat for*
il VaU. capacity from Sto li herrela. » uW
WANTED.
\ com-rmr WOMAN* TO COOK TT A
. V Hotel in Una city.
Apply at the Central Hetel, aoJW"
ROOMS TO LET!
I.MJH ANY ONE ANXIOIU TO
I nl ely furniahrd ROOMS. CQBTenW.» "fj
htiain -h portion of the city. and In * I®"*.
pleaeant home, can Mture the »a»i« "J •*" '
at thia office, «.r at Crawford * Harriritft' 1 * *■
Chart:'* liberal, by the week, month or J««-
•epe-'/w _
NOTICE OF JIISSOLIiTIOS.
"V" OTICE 18 HEREBY fHVEN TtU . T | sfr
C> p«rtuer>hip heretofore eueUnd .
WILLIAM C. SMITH anl L. L.
Dolly Vanlen Haloon, Beatt e, W. T., »
ABr.rtW.M77. d

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