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The New York herald. (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, October 01, 1920, Image 7

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> MILLER ROUSES
? ENTHUSIASM IN
UP STATE VISIT
W
Cheered in Buffalo for His
Strong Stand Against St.
Lawrence Canal.
j WOULD HARM STATE
f Erie County Farmers Hear
Remedy for Problem of
^ Price Adjustment.
0. 0. P. LEADERS CONFER
Women'g Vote in Western
End of State Is Rallying
for Wadsworth.
rV
Mv a Staff Correspondent of Tun Hum
Buffalo, Sept. 30.?Former Judge
Nathan h. Miller, Republican nominee
for Governor, opened his up-State
campaign to-day with two speeches in
Buffalo and one at the Erie County
Fair at Hamburg, dealing mainly wltfy
** r
practical business issues which hit the
people where they live. Despite a
downpour of rain, he was greeted by
large crowds, who displayed an en?
thuslasm lending support to the Republican
prediction that Judge Miller
and the national Republican ticket
^ _ will roll up a majority of 150,000 to
176,000 in the eight counties of the
r Eighth Judicial district.
'I Judge Miller's first address was before
the Buffalo Rotary Club, representative
of every business interest in
< this city. There he took up the matter
of the Federal proposal of an
ooean steamship route from the great
lakes, via the St. Lawrence River,
and let it be known emphatically
that he will do everything in his
power to defeat that effort which, he
l said, would have as its ultimate result
the wrecking of the usefulness of the
Erie barge canal and the reduction of
shipping in the Port of New York.
Not only would the development of
the proposed ocean route ruin the effectiveness
of the canal and serve as a
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' Miller Alters Schedule j
to See Good Ball Game
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By a CorrcMVondtnt of tim hkhaiji.
gUFFALO, Sept. 30.?Former
Judge Nathan L. Miller made
an unexpected change to-night
j in his speaking schedule for next
week. It had been expected that
at the timo the world's series
games were being played in i
i Brooklyn Judge Miller would be
! campaigning up State, but it was i
.announced to-night that he would
! speak in Rome on Monday night i
J and in Westchester, Nassau and
Suffolk counties on Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday.
No afternoon dates have been i
announced as yet, but it is suspected
that the candidate plans j1
i to snend the afternoons at Eb
! bets Field. Ho admitted toI
night that the campaign would
be forgotten for a few hours on
i Tuesday afternoon while he
i Watches the Brooklyn trim?or
! attempt to trim?the Cleveland
i Indians.
1v >
great detriment to business at Us termini
and intervening points, ho said,
but because of the congested condition 1
and Increased cost of rallwny trans- !
portatlon, would have a marked effect j
Upon the cost of commodities to the
entire State and upon the State's pros- I
perlty.
Distinct Monetary Sacrifice.
In addition to that New York's support
of the St. Lawrence River project
would Involve a very distinct monetary
sacrifice, he said. First, since NewYork
State pays 27 per cent, of the
Federal taxes, this Stat* ti-outd "be called
upon to defray 27 per cnt. of the cost
of the project and. In the second place.
New York's help in making that proposal
a reality would result in the Impairment
of an investment of more than
$150,000,000 In the Barge Canal In addition
to the corollary damage alre\dy
outlined.
Instead of supporting the St Lawrence
project, Judge Miller proposed two
courses for combatting it and for making
the most of the advantages of tho
Barge Canal:
First?Make the Barge Canal find Its
terminals 100 per cent, efficient.
Second?Remove the paleylng hand of
the Federal Government from the canal
operation.
In connection with the second suggestion,
he pointed out that it Is useless
to expect private enterprise to build
barges to compete with the Federal Government
barges now in operation.
At the Erie County Fair, despite a cold
rain and muddy roads, the automobiles of
farmers who had come In to hear Judge
Miller filled an acre of parking space.
Judge Miller told them that their problem,
which also is that of the consumer,
is one of distribution. He presented no
fantastic scheme of banishing the middle
man to- oblivion, but admitted that he
fills a definite need and Is here to stay,
but, he said, he must be regulated so he
cannot make ar undue profit that cuts
down tho revenue which the producer
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SIRABILITY OF
ITCH H A l/C R f
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CORD WITH T
ALITY. THE GA1
CCS TO.
THE Ah
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TAILORt
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should got and rrskes the consumer pay 1
more lhan he ought to. Tho first remedy. I
he sue go ted lies In ths stimulation of '
cooperation among the farmers, ao that
the farmer will not be compelled to sell
Ilia crop when the market Is slutted.
"To-day farmers are receiving the lowrst
prices while cot sumers are paying tho
highest," he said. "Ily proper cooperation.
by tho aid of rruniclpa^ttes, counties
and the State, more storage facilities
must be porvldeo t? enable the farmer to < ,
finance his crdp so that ho can sell at o
stable jirlces and obtain regular and M
gradual distribution."
T
Again Challenge* Out. Smith. t(
To-night Judge Miller addressed the "
Erie County Republicom Committee, con- '
sum and demanding that Gov. Smith
come out frankly and tell the people of
New York whether he still favors the
Wilson League of Nations and whether >,
he Is prepared to approve the "carnival ,<
of wafts' 'of the National Administration, j;
or whether his silence on these vital mat- v
t? rs means thai he Is undertaking to (
throw the national ticket overboard.
Kvents here to-dRy demonstrated the f
complete unity and accord of the He- .
publicans of Western New York. (
Francis M. Hugo, Secretary of State. s
who sought the nomination for the Governorship
before the convention. Joined
Judge Miller here and spoke In Ills he- <
half at the Fair Grounds. Secretary j.'
Hugo will accompany the candidate the
rest of tills week. Judge Miller was ,,
taken to the Fair Grounds by John Lord u
O'ltrlan, who was also an aspirant for |4
the nomination before the convention. ^
Most active In the arrangements for
Judge Miller's visit to Buffalo was Fred "
Grelner, Republican leader of Erie
county, who led Mr. O'Brlan's unsue- "
cessful fight for the nomination.
George A. Glynn, chairman of the ^
Republican State Commltee, came to ^
Buffalo with Judge Miller and met with *
the party lenders from the several coun- ?
ties composing the Eighth Judicial Dls- n
Irlet. Judge Miller made a short ad- a
Iress to the meeting, which was the last
cf a series of district conferences and
narked the completitlori of Judge Mller"s
Introduction to the entire State organization.
/
The reports to Chairman Glynn were
nost encouraging, he said. He was
particularly pleased with the splHt of
cooperation the women are showing
ivlth the men. The Eighth Judicial
District meeting to-day resulted in the
completion of a State organlzaXlon of
Lhe women, the only two counties heretofore
lacking a woman's organization,
Niagara and Chautauqua, reporting
completion of their woman's organizations.
Mrs. Arthur L. Livermore, chairnan
of the Women's State Executive
Jommjttee, talked to the women and
tier remarks met with marked enthu
ilasm.
Chairman Glynn said Indications are
that the entire Republican women's
rote In this part of the State will
be east for Senator James W. Wadsworth.
despite lhe opposition to him
which had cropped out at various places
previously on account of his stand on
suffrage. He attributed the present favorable
altitude of the women to the
'act that they realize that Senator
IVadsworfh's stand on the suffrage
piestlon represented an absolute sincerity
which will be dependable liereifter.
Judge Miller will speak to-morrow at
ronawanda. Le Rov and Batavla.
'
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D O L
r rr r? ? * a % r r? r?
/ v n jvi si iyc (
REASONABLY
rEN DEVELOI
HE FINCH LEY
WENT SK
M FINISH WIT
ANOYANCE OF A I
(BAD Y- TO-PUT-ON
ED AT FASHION
TOHEJE
i t 46 th. St r
sTEW YORK
. ' viiw;,. iiL ,. 1 vt- . . ? . it t v "
!W YOU HERALD, ]
10SY OUTLOOK SEEN" :
BY RESERYE BOARD |
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Continued front First Page. |
-hlle on shorter time or lower quantity
f production, and under these condlions
there has been nn ample supply of j
ibor for current operating requirements,
'he condition In most places has tended
a bring about abandonment of demands
ir hl<?hor wages. The movement toward 1
>wer price' levels la proceeding griid- j
ally. j (
Mctnl anil Ore .Markets.
I !
fti the iron and steel trade the month I
as been a period of change. Produc- I
on of Iron and steel in August was the '
irgest of any month In the present '
<\ar with the exception of March, and
uipur nna cwmi??ru ii> i j
Consumers show greater caution,
here Is small future buying. However,
lth the exception of the automobile Inustry,
from which cancellations and t
uspenslons of Iron and steel have been
ccclved (|uite freely, the absorptive
ower of consumption Appears to have
ttle altered. The decline In orders has
een viewed by many producers without 1
special concern, and they are welcomng
the opportunity to convert their
nfllled obligations, ftailroad buying Is
evelopinff slowly. 1'rlces are showing i
o general weakness. The ore move- i
lent Is Improving, Interior furnaces beig
much better supplied, ns cars are
inch more numerous.
Metal mining 'during the period in
iiestion still, shows some stagnation
'he output of gold In California and I
levada continues to fall off on account
f the low purchasing power of the
ictal. Silver mines in Utah and Idaho <
re working on a basis wTiich will probHis
Trade Marl
Worth More T
yTTTEKi
yy said, "Y
great a;
the manufactui
my greatest at
advertising has
burn down ton
time, but if I 1<
would be done
Collin
14&3 Broachrwy
General a
"York " jZana
The Right
mamamaamMmjammmmmmmmtBm
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COGNIZES Ti
PRICED CLOTH
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o i n/Ji/ziAL/
D IS AN EXAMPi
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HOUT#
:RY-ON
PARK
sir
Get
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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1,
ibly be slightly ahead of 1919. Higher 1
iricea of silver early In the your probibly
stimulated production somewhat as
. ompared with present conditions. Copier
from the Arizona region will prohibit
be produced In larger volume than
n 1919. Elsewhere there is no substan.ial
change.
OCTOBER MILK PRICE
SAME AS LAST MONTH
Dairymen's League to Aid
Farmers to Sell Product.
The Dairymen's Dengue, S03 Fifth
ivenue, issued a statement inst night
tnnounclng thai m'.'.k will be sold to
fn<nl mlllr iIa-iI.pb tn.nmiTnR' fnr tile
mmc price it was in September. The
farmer swill receive 8.27 cents a quart
for milk testing 3.6 per cent, butter fat, |
which Is nearly one cent below the pro- j
Auction price.
PRICES STAY UP IN N. Y.;\
CUTS IN OTHER CITIES
Local Restaurants Blame Mid- ,
dlemen; Sugar Down.
Reports were received in New York
last night from various cities of additional
reductions In the wholesale and
retail prices of sugar, potatoes, pianos,
motor cars and shirts. In Cleveland announcement
wns also made that forty
restaurant owners will reduce prices
from 10 to 15 p?r cent, beginning to-day.
None of the price reductions, however,
were made by New York firms, except
In augur. *
Edgar II Bctts, president of Earl &
Wilson Company of Troy, manufacturers
sf shirts and collars, announced that the
wholesale price of shirts had been reC
han His Plant
:hetourof inspection the visitor
ou have certainly accumulated
sscts here." "I am sorry," said
rer, "that I cannot show you
iset. It is the good will my
i brought. My factory could
lorrow, and I could rebuild in
3st my good will this business
for."
\rmstrong. Inc
at 42nd Street. New'York City
ADVERTISING AGENTS
fen Paris ' "7oromt0 rZHo?treaX
: Angle in Advertising
I $
s
YE
ES
CT
OF
IE.
I
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r
1920.
1 duced from $1.50 to $21 a dozen, depending
upon the quality of the goods.
Tlris concern recently announced a reduction
in the price of soft collars.
Potatoes sold for 00 cents a bushel
wholesale in Indianapolis yesterday. a 1
decline of $1 a bushel, and In New York ;
the Federal Sugar Refining Company j
announced a reduction of one-half cent
a pound on granulated sugar, making
the new price 13 cents a pound. Other
big refiners are expected to make similar '
reductions.
In Unjoin. Xeh., the Patriot Motor
Company made a reduction of from $200
to $395 In the prices of its trucks.
Lyon & Healy, piano manufacturers,
announced In Chicago yesterday that reductions
of from $50 to $250 have been
made In the prices of pianos. The wage !
. I
ST<
__ run r
=m i
Fourteenth 5
to-day
LStap
?
235
Every Style that is
the merit of this s
no less than fashic
BLOUSES of Geor
satin, in white, fles
blue are made in
with long or short i
Trimmings include
/ i ..;n. u.
U ./wi uiiu sun khiui
NO EXCHANGES
*
454 I
Our regular
$37.75 to $42.75
$k
No rhapsody a
as the a#mple
immediately t
viable opportu
There are twelve n
equally as smart.
Materials are silve
models are handsoi
All are beautifully
Brown, dryad, Cop?
NO EXCHANGES
acale will not be affected by.the reduc-J
lion, it was announced.
H. W. Boyd, president of the Armour j
Leather Company In Chloafc, said that ,
unless there waa a decided change In the
present condition of the leather market
the company must shut down. He declared
that tanneries all over the country
are oiverating at only 30 per cent,
capacity, and that not more than 10
per cent, of the New Kngland shoe factories
ore running.
"Never In my twenty-five years of experience,"
he said, "have 1 seen the
leather market in such bad condition.
The whole trouble lie* with the retailers,
who havi profiteered enormously and
who ha\. refused to liquidate, although !
tanners and manufacturers have gone :
their limit."
ORE OPEN 9 A. M. *o 5 P. ?
?=i i/~\l U \3
Street AVeat of
T<
n^EASON 5
9 BLOW
4.86
Our regular $6.94 to $7.97
new and fashionable. Ji
plendid selection, unequa
>n.
gette, tricolette, taffeta,
>h, bisque, and various sha
over-blouse, tie-back and
ilec ves.
? fine Vol., Venise and real i
"oidery and fancy stitching
tr?F^EAS0N\
i iTn o o * o I
8
bout these suits could so
facts, which cannot fail
hat these values are a r
inity, not to be matchec
todels in all, I hose ilhcntra
rtone, tricotine, serge an
mely trimmed with sealine
lined with plain or pallet
jnhagen, navy and black /
-7
7
WE BEGIN AT HOME! ij
We believe that faith in a security
should bej(in at home. That U why
we Guarantee every dollar which I]
] you invest in Prudence-Bond* by ji
every dollar of our resources.
I Write for Booklet J-70 to-day '
describing Prudence-Bonds in jj
: detail.
REALTY ASSOCIATES
INVESTMENT CORPORATION |j
31 Nassau St. 162 Remasn St, j
New York City Brooklyn, N. Y.
li
RTI
M==]
Fifth Avenue
3-MORROW
iALE 1
SES
jdge for yourself
lied for economy i
mignonette and
des of brown and ,
tuck-in models,
filet laces, fringe,
!# [
NO RETURNS '
ALE"
JITS
Our regular
$37.75 to $42.75
impress you
to convince
are and en1
elsewhere.'
ted and six more
d velour. Many
*ncd silk. / Jf 1 ivS^
?irc? /V <o 20 t/rs.
J . -']
NO RETURNS |
=^J

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