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The New York herald. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, October 03, 1920, Image 16

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JAPANESE MAY SEND
DELEGATIONS TO U. S.|
Societies There with American
Ties Vonsiuer Means of Improving1
Relations.
FEAR SOCIALISM SPREAD
New Shinto Religion Held To j
Be Anarchistic Under Loy- i
alty Cloak.
f Bu the Associated Brass.
I-OKIO, Oct. 2.?The American-Japan
octet y has appointed a committee to
consider possible steps >to be taken to
improve relations 01 me two countries,
anil some Idea prevails of despatching a
delegation to the United States. The
executive councils of the American Association
of Tokio, Yokohama and Kobe
Also are deliberating on the American
question. Some officials In .lapan favor 1
pending a special commission of Japanese
to the United States as soon as
possible, although the portion such a
Commission would be expected to have Is
Vague and undefined.
The Impression exists here that Japan
lb preparing to propose a Joint high
Commission as a last resort, in the event
of failure of the diplomatic pourparlers
r. to find a solffclon of the California
Question.
Former Premier Okuma's recent condemnation
of the Indifference of public
opinion with regard to grave questions
t defecting the nut ion's Interests has been
. Allowed by official utterances calling
Attention to the necessity of maintaining
cordial relations between the classes
and of directing public thought so as
not to harm the social order.
Tl.a ..........1 ?) .1... ...... Ukl.tn - li.......
Omotokyo, which popularly Is supposed
to preach Socialistic and even anarchistic
igeas under the cloak of loyalty to
the imperial house, is cited as dangerous
to society and alarming to the military
authorities because It is affecting many
officers and men of the army, especially
the reservists. The opposition politicians
claim that, despite the fact that
it is fortified by a majority In the House
of Representatives, the Hara Cabinet Is
unpopular because of Internal conditions,
including uneasiness concerning the economic
and financial situation and high
prices growing out of unemployment.
& king of belgians will
* ' v finish trip in brazil
Crisis in Cabinet Not to Curtail
Albert's Visit.
Rio Jakkiro, Oct. 1.?King Albert of
the Belgians will not curtail his visit to
. Brazil because of the Belgian Cabinet
' crisis, so far as rs known here. His
original .ilans contemplated a month's
stay.
! The royal party, accompanied by Pres- ,
Idem and Senhora Pessou and high Bra- j
zllian officials, left Rio Janeiro this eve- i
ning to visit cltiesJn the State of Mlnas 1
Geraes The first stop will be Belle |
Horlzonte at noon Saturday. From
Minus Geraes the party will go to Sao
Paulo, returning to Rio Janeiro about i
? October 8. Elaborate preparations are |
being made to welcome the party In the |
cities visited.
Crown Prince Leopold Is expected to i
arrive in Brazil October 5.
SHIP SIIIOXKY BEKLOATHI).
Vioo, Spain, Oct. 1.?The American
teamshlp Slboney, which ran aground
In Vigo harbor September 10. has been
refloated by tups which were sent to her
assistance. She will be repaired here
' provisionally, afterward going Into drydock
at Ferrol.
HIT
Women's t
f % Hudso
? floats
f FASHIONS
COMING S
MANSHIP
? OF CONSI
T LENCE E1
f VALUES
LAST SEA
c-Cc, Ibe En/urged
V Number oj
W di vidua
^ 1
L W 36-INCH HUDSON
(dyed muskrat) of
f skins, large cape
collar, flare cuffs
?- - m
IW W KAT-LUA I ur I
t3jL qunlitv skins in stn
it v
I
, "J"
25,000 RED TROOPS
CAPTURED BY POLES
Pursuit of Foe Below Lida
Continues, Says Warsaw.
Warsaw, Oct. 2.?Northeast of Grodno
the Poles have reached the River Ulla.
hulf way between Grodno and Vilna, the
Lithuanian capital, says the otiiclal
statement on lighting operations issued
to-day.
The Polish Second Army captured 23,- j
000 Russian Soviet soldiers and took 100 ;
cannon between September 20 and 30,
the statement adds.
"Pursuit of the Bolshevik divisions
routi-d below Idda continues," the statement
says. "The group of Col. Dabiornackl
Is approaching' Novo-Grodek. Below
Baranovltchl Po.sen troops captured
a thousand prisoners and thirty-six ma- <
chine guns.
"In the region of Suwallci the action I
has been suspended as a result of a Po- |
lish-ldthuanian agreement."
SHOOTING DUCKS, HITS
HIMSELF AND DIES
John D. Isaacs Killed in Manitoba;
Premier Escapes.
sperm! Despatch to Tiik Hbkai.p.
Winnipeg, Oct. 2.?Premier T. C. Norris
of Manitoba had a narrow escape j
from death and John D. Isaacs, an engineer
of Vancouver, was killed while
shooting ducks In the marshes of northern
Manitoba yesterday. Premier Nor- !
rls and Mr. Isaacs were in a canoe and j
nreu simultaneously at a not k or uucks.
The canoe was upset and the remaining
barrel of Mr. Isaacs's gun was discharged
accidentally, the load entering
his side.
Premier Morris righted the canoe and
helped his companion into it. Mr. Isaacs
died a few minutes later. The shooting
party was In honor of Pr. Matthews of
Minneapolis, a surgeon of the Mayo i
Clinic. Mr. Isaacs's father was formerly I
chief engineer of the Southern Pacific
Railroad and lives in Mew York
$237,315,955 DEBT
REDUCTION IN MONTH
Record Not Expected to Be
Repeated Soon.
Washington, Oct. 2.?The nation's
gross debt was reduced by $237.315,99ri
in September, according to figures made
public to-day by the Treasury Department.
A1 n?f IHa rArln/iMnn 1? t-V..-.,
floating debt or Issues of certificates of
indebtedness. Outstanding certificates
now aggregate $2,347,791,000. which is
included in the total gross debt of $24,087.356,000.
At the time of the Income and profits
tax payment. September 15, nearly
$650,000,000 in certificates of indebtedness
matured. Simultaneously a new
issue of $450,000,000 was offered. Tax
payments provided funds to meet the
difference in certificate issues.
Government receipts for the month
totalled $911,000,000, while expenditures
fell below $500,000,000. Ttiis difference,
which was larger than usual,
was explained as due to a decline In the
demands for funds from the railroads
under the guarantee provisions of the
transportation act.
Officials said, however, that the same
ratio between receipts and expenditures
probably would not be maintained
next month. They expect the railroads
to come In for larger sums, as they will
have tnade a final accounting of profits
and losses for the six months over which
their earnings were guaranteed by the
railroad law. As soon as this accounting
has been made the Interstate Commerce
Commission will pass on the
claims and the Treasury will then be
called upon to make final settlement.
Treasury officials would not estimate todny
the amount which they expect to
be paid out under the guarantee provisions.
*nd Misses'
n Seal
and lVra\
i NEW FOR THE
>EASON, WORKAND
QUALITY
STENT EXCEL^/ERY
SEASON,
SURPASSING
SON
' Daylight Fur Shop Merit
' Hudson Seal Coats and
I in Character, Chara
alue of the Unlimited 0
I SEAL COAT 40-INCH HI
first quality (dyed musk
4?c.?o skins, large ?
lar. turn-bacl
HUDSON SEAL (dyed muskra
light line model with deep cap
IININE FUR SHOP?Fount
itklin Simon
*H AVENUE, ,<7th and 38th
\
THE_ 1
WESTERN CANADA 1
FACES COAL TIEUP
j
Miners 4 i o11 i 11 ?r $12 h ml $15 u
Day Demand Increase, Operators
Powerless.
.?ii uivvp uro <t i? i w r
V V I? J . IM.1 .IVli UM ? uiuu^
I nitod Mine Workers of Amer-j
iea Seeking to Control the
District.
Special Dispatch to Tub Hsbau).
Winnipeg, Oct. ?Western Canada's
great soft coal mining district, located
in southern Alberta and eastern British
I Columbia, whence is derived the coal'
supply for the prairie region, is face to
face with a complete tieup owing to the
refusal of operators to grant the de- J
mands of the United Mine Workers of
America, the chief of which 1? reoognl-1
tlon of the one big coal miners' union. j
Experienced miners In this district
now earn between $12 and $15 a day
and common labor $7.50 a day. They
I demand an increase of $1.50 a day.
Back of this demand is the organization
of the United Mine Workers of America,
which is fighting for supremacy in this
I .Uct.l^l
The Canadian Minister of Labor has
been in the coal mining field for a week
trying to avert a strike, but to-day
mine owners were pessimistic and declared
the Minister of Labor had been
able to do nothing save to promise protection
by the police and military if
they will undertake to operate the mines
in the face of a strike. However, the
mine operators declare they must grant
the demands of the men in so far as
wage increase is concerned or play into
the hands of the leaders of the United
Mine Workers of America, which, in
j addition to the wage increases, seeks
| recognition and abolition of what is
I known as the check off system.
I The local union confines its demands
1 to the wage increase.
A strike has been called for next
Monday, and mine owners say they must
grant this increase to members of the
lccal union of miners In order to
strengthen it in its fight against the
United Srfine Workers of America, which
is greatly feared by the operators.
Ten thousand men are involved in the
strike ordeg.
STOIfEKKEPEkS FORM I'M ON.
Madrid, Oct. 3.?Storekeepers of this
city have formed a union with the intention
of boycotting a number of banks
which have secured freeholds on the best
positions of the main streets of Madrid,
from which ihey have evicted tenants,
forcing them to move to less favorable
places of trade. Banks thus offending,
it is asserted, will not receive patronage
from members of the organization.
OVATF.!t|ALA TO III II,II HOt'SKS.
Ouatbmajua, Oct. 3.?The. Government
has spent 120,000 in gold for building
lots at the rate of 50 cents a yard on
which to build houses for workingmen(
The houses, which wilt have sanitary appliances,
will be built at a cost within
the means of the workers, who will pay
for them in instalments.
SI HWAV WORKERS STRIKE.
Madrid, Oct. 1.?Work on the rapid
transit subway, which recently lias been
going forward rapidly, has been brought
10 u iiu.il uj u. su mi! ui me enure iorce
of workers, the men deserting the tunnels
and demanding an advance In
wages. The City Council Is conferring
with construction contractors with u
view to reaching a settlement of the
difficulty.
'iw
Iff
*>s . . . 1
ions a Limited c-Ck
Wraps, In- \L
ct eristic yr
Others. Sg3
JDSON SEAL COAT ^
rat) ot tirst quality K
ZIT 695." f
"conn 785." . X
i Floor wM
>% a
* &
STS. * W
J
J _J_
^IEW YORK HERALD,
THOUSAND DIE DAILY |
IN CHINESE FAMINE 1
30,000,000 People Suffering
and Japan to Send Rice.
Tokio, Oct. 2.?The newspapers an- j
nounte to-day that Japan will supply
sun Ann of -I.... In fimhu inf. I
j ferers In China. China will pay for the
i rice through a loan, the newspapers say.
Charles R. Crane, United States Minister
to China, lias cabled President Wlli
son details of the famine in Pekin
district, said a cablegram received here
yesterday by the Board of Foreign Missions
of the Methodist Episcopal Church
from Bishop Wilson S. Lewis.
Bistiop Lew is, who arrived in Pekin
last week, sent ttie following message:
"Thirty million people suffering. One
thousand deaths daily. Conditions
growing worse. Church members dying.
United States Minister Crane has I
cabled details to President Wilson."
Washington-, Oct. 2. ? Assurances
have been received by the State Department
from ttie American Red Cross that
measures toward relief of the famine in
the Pekin district of C^ina will be
taken immediately.
The recently received cablegram from
Charles R. Crane, American Minister to
China, addressed to President Wilson, 1
was turned over to the Hed Cross by the 1
State Department. Air. Crane In his 1
message said that the situation In the I
Pekln district was very serious and
that the need of relief was urgent. He '
suggested that any funds contributed be '
used In promoting public works, thereby 1
giving employment to the famine sufferers.
PANAMA CABINET NAMED.
President Porrax Appoints Members
of Ministering Hotly.
Panama, Oct. 1.?Members of the new
i
Panaman Cabinet were appointed to- (
day by President Porras. They are as
follows:
Secretary of Foreign Relations, Kabio ,
Arosemena: Public Works, Manuel
Quintero; Government and Justice,
Ricardo Ylfaro; Education, Jephtha
Duncan, .and Finance, Santiago de la
Guardia.
Ill
Jenny
Hisfor
Special
Immediate]
pearance of
and Mr. Mi<
Jenny Lind C
cert, they w
Edison Lab
sing the prin
that they sat
I Hall, thus a
I generations a:
Creation
in these 1ml
I I Owners of
Edison she
? orders now. i
I J lor these Jer
I I tennial Re
:! will undoub
I mendous.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER; 3,
GERMANY SEEKING I
TO SAVE INDEMNITY i
1
Continued from First Pag<.
)?n use that the United States, Engand
and Franco are assured of having.
Herr Hue avers that England has attained
8* per cent, of her peace time
;oal production and France 90 per cent.,
shile Germany has only 67 per cent.
He ohurges that France is not using all
aer coal but la accumulating It, and
this has a depressing e/fect on German
labor, which under the Spa agreement
s forced to work for France In prefersnce
to working for Germany.
Typical German Complaint.
The following quotation from the
Bourse Gazette Is typical of the complaints
heard In many quarters here:
"The fact that until now Germany
tins fulfilled the Spa agreement seems
to have created the Impression that her
:oal losses, after all, will not affect
German Industry. Obviously this Is an
Illusion, as Is shown by reports from
the Ruhr region Itself, the heart of the
:oal fields of Germany, where the shortige
of coal is making Itself felt.
"A largo plant there manufacturing
brass, bronze, copper and mining and
shipbuilding supplies purposes to close
down Its foundry and mechanical department.
A factory making agricultural
Implements has already stopped production
and limited Itself to repair work
because In August It could not obtain a
single ton of coal.
"River boats are hardly being operated,
most of them being Idle, their
[ rows discharged. The only plant In the
r-ntlre Ruhr region making mineral oils
for railroads and mines will be closed
down soon. One of Germany's largest
steel plants has extinguished the fires In
rleven of Its nineteen blust furnaces. As
the production of Iron decreases there is 1
a decrease in the amount of resulting 1
slag, which Is so desperately needed by t
German farmers for fertilizer. c
"Besides the furnaces mentioned, sev- c
cral sheet iron plants, rolling mills and f
foundries had to close down, while the f
suspension of one steel mill reduced the i
monthly output of ship plates by 2,600 f
tons. One iron ore works consuming 1
4,000 tons of coal a month received less t
than one-flfth of this tonnage in August. <
"All manufacturers of glass, rubber, t
Lind G
i
ivoi - vui iv
I' \ jj
\ FRIED/
||i\ Jenny I
im4 I imp?
vIIaYl \ Corn
Notice ^ jcn
ly after the ap- U
Miss Hempel I
idleton in the y\
entennial Con- Ijr
fill go to the "
oratories and
icipal numbers
lg at Carnegie
ssuring future
n absolute R Eof
their voices
:oric numbers.
The New
>uld leave their
as fhe demand
my Lind Cen-Creations
tedly be tre
ickets may be purchased
\
1920.
taper, chemicals, Ac., complain that
iielr lack of coal Is growing dally. These
nstances could be enumerated ad inInltum."
The Spa agreement, however, constl.uted
a concession to Germany, but the
Sermans, anticipating the Geneva meetng,
despair of any comprehensive, oon rgtc
results being achieved there. Howver,
even If the result were "tantanount
to bankruptcy" for Germany It
vould not save German Industry quickly
>r place German finances on a healthy
looting.
The peace treaty Is not to blame for
:he colossal deficit In the German
judget, which represents chiefly the cost
>f the war. Of the 57,000,000,000 marks
ihort this year the Versailles treaty was
esponalble for aDout zt>,uuu,uuu,uuu
narks. Of the 132,000,000^000 mark^
n Indemnifications to Germans (not Including
the reparation figures to bo set
i Geneva), the Indemnification delverles
under the peace treaty made up
>nly a small shace. Ninety billion marks
50 to repay Germans for property confiscated
In enemy countries during the
var. Such Items are beyond the scope
>f the Geneva meeting.
Thus the Germans see they are within
1 vortex of forces which lie beyond their
control. They cannot balance their
jooks because Ffance and England can:iot
balance theirs. The start towards
reform, If there Is to be reform, must be
uade in America, they say.
Prominent German officials declare it
s their personal opinion that the only
mlvatlon lies In the United States cancelling
the British and French loans,
rhese officials grant that this Is a
Irastlc method .and they do not pretend
lhat It will be resorted to, but once the
[.Tnlted States makes up her mind to lose
:hls war Investment the endless chain of
>enury In Europe will, they declare, be
jroken. Unless It Is broken these men
lo not see any real reconstruction In
Europe or lasting peace for America.
BIJDAPKST If AS PILGRIM DAY.
Budapest, Sept. (delayed).?The
Hungarian Protestant Synod at a meetng
held here to-day. .sent Its greeting"
o American Proteatanta on the occasion
>f the Pilgrim tercentenary, which was
:ommemorated In Budapest by a solemn
lervice In the Calvinist Church. The
lervice was attended by a large throng,
ncluding the members of the American
md British missions. After a prayer
>y Bishop Petri the choir chanted old
ime Protestant psalms and Prof. Antal
lelivered a sermon upon the history and
ichievements of the Pilgrims.
enfennia
eft Came
Jenny Lind's First Concert at i
i HEMPEL,
jIND Live Again
IEDA HEMPEL, Edison artis
Grand Opera Star, has been chc
:rsonate Jenny Lind in the Cen
:ert to be given in Carnegie Hall,
6th. This great honor has co
Hempel because she is the only
ano whose voice approximates th<
id quality of Jenny Lind's superb
thur Middleton, another great '
t, has been selected for the part of
:tti, who assisted Jenny Lind at h
ert in America at Castle Garden, si
s ago.
le coming Historical Concert, tc
iorate the one-hundredth anniv
:nny Lind's birth, will be an exact
le first concert. Duplicates of th<
ames will be worn, the same pi
be given, the ushers and orchest
s as their predecessors did. Miss
will sing the same old arias an<
own accompaniments on the same
ly Lind used.
Hear THE NEW EDISO
AUDUBON Alt ! BTOHK, 1404 Ml
Virligla" Ave., N. V. C.
BRODY. I.OU18, 421 Knlckerbocke
Ave., Brooklyn.
BUCKIE V-N'KWn.VLL CO., 133.'
Rrov I?.?} . Brooklyn.
BlTUKI.KY-NKWH.Vl.L CO., ISAtl
St. A Mh Ave., N. Y. C.
CLAN' Y, T. J., 2.14 Myrtle Ave.
Brooklyn.
CORD-PA FURNITUBK CO., 131
Wiwihlnirton St., Hoboken.
COY I.E. T HUKTON, 071 Ber?ei
Ave., Jersey City.
DIAMOND DISC SHOP. 10 Flftl
Ave., N. V. O.
EDISON SHOP, 473 Firth Ave.
N Y O.
EDISON SHOP, 801 Broad St.
Newark
EDISON SHOP. Main St., Ea?
< )rati*?F.I.I.IS,
J., 141 t anal St.,. Stapleton
S. I.
FENNKLL a Co., O.. 2112(1 Thin
Ave., N. Y. C.
(iOI.riSMITIt, MAX. 1525 Flrsl
Ave.. N. Y. O.
UAKDMAN PKCK CO.. 47 Flatbed;
Ave.. Brooklyn.
HAKDMAN PKCK CO.. 433 Flftl
Ave., N. Y. C.
IIAK1.KM Ft UNITUBE CO., 141
W. 125th St., N. Y. O.
HKNNINII, IIOKHF.CK St HF.Y
8KB, 351 Flushing Ave., Bonx Island
City.
H ASSUME li, A. A E., 241 Jackson
Ave., Jersey City
HOW AKIl MUSIC HOUSE, 431
Central Ave., Jersey City.
HYDE MUSIC CO.. 308 Central
Ave., Jersey city.
% KKAK P, PRRIJ, INC.. 38 Cortlatvit
* St., N. Y. O.
! at The Edison Shop, 4\
^PPIPPPPI*"" '
AMERICANS SAVE AUSTRIANS.
Man) Thunninda of Llvra Preaervfd
by (. 8. Krllef.
London, OcL 1.?American relief in
Austria has actually saved the lives of
between 50,000 and 100,000 children, besides
preserving the health of all the
A New, Bi
For the rfm
Housewives and
"TELEPHG^t
of Home and B
A Ready-reference G
the Thousand-and-one
the Home, Office, Sto
Be Ordered by 'Phone
Published
THE NEW YC
See "WANT
/ Telephone FITZ R
Advertij
I Celebrc
gie Hall I
Castle Garden, September n, 1850.
imotis Edison Artist
for New York's M
it and Before you go to the
>sen to Concert?or, if you car
tennial one of the shops liste
, Octo- demonstrate what Mr.
me to posterity. Mr. Edison
living dollars in research work
: pure. ment that would literal
voice. human voice.
Edison , ,
^iannr Think what it would
er first could hear Jenny Lind'
eventv sounded when she san
seventy years ago! Th
if you will call on any <
> com- glad to let you hear 1
rersary of Frieda Hempel's voi
replica sound on the stage a
s same October 6th.
ogram
ra will Be sure to ask us 1
Hem- copy of "Edison and M
i play illustrated brochure, w
piano of this wonderful inv
E DIS O N?"The Phonoj
N At The Following SI
KRAFT. FRED, Grand Central Terminal.
N, v. o.
r LAIIN FURNITURE CO.. 303 W.
42nd St.. N. Y. O.
1 I.ANKKRING CO., 616 Washington
St., Hoboken.
1 LOUR, THEODORE. 708 Noetrand
Ave., Brooklyn.
MAAS, H.. 417 Bprln* St.. Week
lloboknn.
l> MARSHAL. IRVINO, 431 Rroadway,
Bayonne.
i MONTAUVO, R., 310 W. Front St..
I'lnlnfield
I MONTALVO, H., 00 Smith St..
Perth Ainlioy.
MONTALVO. K.. 10r. All .any St..
New Brunswlek.
MONT1CKLLO MUSIC SHOP.
Jewett & Montleello Avna.. Jersey
t city.
NELSON, HAUL. 620 Vnnderbllt
, Ave.. Brooklyn.
POKHLAND, B. 1502 Broadway.
I Brooklyn.
RICHER, WILLIAM, 868 Newark
l Ave.. Jersey city.
ROSE WALL. CHARLES (?.. 08
I Flatbunh Ave.. Brooklyn.
SALKTAN, Henry. 2161 Broadway,
i N. Y. 0.
SECORD PIANO CO.. 3403 Broadl
way. N. Y. C.
HTKAdMAN, KHANK W., 41 Warburton
Ave., Y tinkers.
STERNKOPF MUSIC CO.. 157 .
Summit Ave.. West Hol)oken.
i TAYLOR. A. II . 316 Fulton St
Jamaica.
I VAAOR A RASMUSSKN. 562.1
Fifth Ave.. Brooklyn
I VK ITII A DOHN. 6.10 llrrRenllne
Ave., West New York. ?
WARNER. II. CITY. 1223 Bedford
Ave., Brooklyn.
'3 Fifth Avenue, New Yc
o
?
> >h
ft %
F- ?
nation's youths, according to Gilchrist
B. Stockton, until recently head of the T
American Relief Association Mission in
Austria, who is sailing to-morrow on
the steamer Aquit&nla.
It is his intention, he said, to urge the
continuation of tho relief for 300,000
Austrian children, which he considers
necessary to prevent them growing up
to be weaklings. The cost of feeding
them amounts to $15,000 daily.
ig feature
venience of
I Business Men
DIRECTORY
usiness Needs"
uide Showing Where
Things Needed in
re and Factory May
at a Moment's Notice.
Daily in
)RK HERALD
' Ad. Pages.
OY 6000 to Place
cements.
. *
ition
Od 6*
, Will Make
usic Lovers
Jenny Lind Memorial
inot go?come to any
:d below and let us
Edison has done for
spent three million
: to perfect an instruly
Re-Create the
I mean if today you
s voice, exactly as it
g at Castle Garden
iat is impossible, but
ane of us we shall be
the Re-Creation
ce, exactly as it will
t Carnegie Hall on
ror a complimentary
lusic," a handsomely
hich tells the story
ention, The New
graph with a Soul."
hops
>rk I
u
f
/

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