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The New York herald. (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, October 12, 1920, Image 4

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4
POLES MAKE TRUCE
WITH REDS TO-DAV
Signing of Armistice Delayed J
I'll til Afternoon for
Ukrainian Text.
F LGHTING TO END OCT. 17 \
1 iraine and TVliito Ttussia J
Recognized and Polish
P.oundary Defined.
.iii the .1 racial tit Pra?,
:u:a, Oct. 11.?The Soviet Itusso-'
P< lish uimlst'.ce and preliminary peace
tn aty were not signed to-night. It was
announced that a delay until to-morrow
m'.ernoor was made necessary because
of tho Impossibility of getting the Ultra
nian text prepared.
There are many unverified rumors of
la e disagreements in the delegations. '
It Is known that Secretary Lorenz, of
tli > Bolshevik delegation, telephoned to
ili 5 Poles shortly before 9 o'clock to- j
nj ;ht and apologized for inability to ,
<:o nplcte the Ukrainian text for signatu
to-night. lie explained that it
W' uld be ready to-morrow afternoon.
Hie armistice will run for twenty-one
daye, and l'orty-elght hours notice will,
be necessary before either side can
i'; ally break it. If It is not broken for
li. pencil of twenty-one dayB It will
c i i.lnu automatically in effect far an
Irleflnlto period, with a provision it
nr.- y b9 broken on fourteen days notice.
Settlement in liquidation of Polish
i netary claims was not included in tne
ii rustics agreement, but will be taken
i In the treaty of peace, according rp
Pi lirh oillclale. The armistice. In the
o irse of determining the boundary line,
i* '.agnizes tho independence of the
l'1 ruino and White Russia.
f'ilteru Days for itatlflca tlon.
The preliminary treaty must he rntifUd
within fifteen days after Its slgnaiue
atn! the formal exchange of ratfl<su
Ion papers must take place at Ltbuu
aiihin six days after ratification. Fatiur
to da this will constitute an abrogation
o,' the armistice within forty<-i..
lit hours after the time limit expires.
The armistice names midnight <">ctobc
17. us the definite time war is to
ce i on land and sea and in the air.
Tioop movements necessary to execute
th armistice conditions must bo executed
:,t not less than twenty kilometers dally ,
a s i mus: begin not later than midnight
< 1 OClOOiT J.I. i lie um/ mil hai.
u.e,: under the direction of mixed coni n
salons. The taking of hostages and .
h iVvin nation of civil prisoners will not '
?' permitted during the withdrawal of
I h iro'U s. Compulsory sale of goods
a .ii"i re' lisitionn are forbidden.
The first article of the annLstrec reads I
as follow?: 1 (
"The contracting parties, in accordance
witli th?? self-deterrnlnation of na- '
' iens. recognize the independence of the
PI- raino and White Hu.-sla and have '
ag-eed ro decide that the eastern bound"ry
of Poland?thai Is, the boundary beween
Poland on the one side and ti e .
PI raino and White Russia on the other
-shall constitute the following line: 1
"The River jjvina from the frontier '
be-ween Latvia and Russia to the point
where the frontier of the former Gov- '
eminent of Vilna joins with the frontiei
of the Government of Vitebsk."
"Thence along the frontier of the '
To mer govt rmnents of Vilna and
Vitebsk to the village and railway station
of Orzechowvno, which remains
Polish. Then . gain along the eastern 1
' frontier of tiie Government of Vilna to
m. point where the districts of the Iivlna
and Lepel and liorisov Join and from
this point to the village of -uala Czer- i
.d'-o. whicii remains white Russian
Thence, southwest, cutting tho lake on
Mie River Beresina to the village of 1
^oraeczvi'k, wiiioh rgpiaIns white RusThence
southwest to the River I
t<? a point east of Dolginov end ]
along the Vilia River to the road south
of Dolginov.
"Tlwnce south along the River Kzcilla
down stream to tl,e Junction with the i
ltiver Rybczanka. south to the railway'i
station of Racoszkowioe, the station and ]
faiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmffir
jjj
I ^
1 M
1 ^
ill
?31 AN -EXCiiPTK
/\ select a I
JL JL sizes; the
B| French brown, 1
IMPORTE1
El Extraordinary
Value at
?1 ' TH
H
M
r
ri
'
k* ' ' '
-
I
own - remaining white Russian: East
rom the town of Rakown to the Ullages
if Volna. and Rubtnsewlcs to the milray
of Minsk-Baranoritrhi, near Koosovo,
which remains Polish; thenec
<outh half way between Nleewlez and
Pimkowicse and then half way between j
rCleck and Cimkowicse; then south 01 i
.he "Warsaw-Moscow road, cutting thin
ourt west of Flllpowica: tliou tho short-:
st way to the River Uan near Csudzln. 1
Boundary With I kralar.
"Thence south along the River Lan
lpstroam to Its source; then to the eonluence
of the Rivers Korczyk and Slues;
hen along the River Korczyk upsveeam,
caving the town of Korlec Polish;
hence southwest, leaving Klllkijow and
Clllklew on tho Ukrainian side to Mlliayn,
which remain* Polish; thence south,
uttng- the nallway of Rovno-Oepepovka
ilong the River Horyn to tho River
/ilia, the town of Ostrog remaining
Polish; thence along the River Villa upstream
to Novy Taw, which remains
.'krainlan; thence In a general southern
lircotlon, cutting the Horyn near L.aniwov.
which remains Polish; thence to
:ho River Ubrucz. leaving the locality of
Bialozorke Polish; thence along the
liver Zbrucas to Its confluence with the
Dniester.
"The definition of the frontier along
he river contemplates In the case 'of
lavignble river* the median line of tho
irmcipal channel; In the case of nontavigable
rivers it contemplates the
nedian line of the waterway or principal
irm.
"Russia and Ukraine renounce their J
lghts over territory west of this froni?r,
while Toland renounces its claim to
til territory east of this frontier. A
rpecial frontier commission will he set1
ip immediately to trace the frontier ami
>rect sign posts.
"Both parties agree that if the diluted
territories between Poland and
Athuania form part of the territories
vest of the described boundary the detision
as to their belonging to Poland
ir l.ithuanla remains exclusively with
Poland and Lithuania.
"Both contracting parties assure
>ach other complete respect for their
date of sovereignty and agree to retain
from any kind of Intervention In
he Internal affairs of the other. Moreiver,
fcoth agree to Include In the treaty
ibllg&tions neither to create nor support
irg&nizations which have for their pur?ose
an armed struggle against the
ither contracting party nor to seek the
'estructlon of the existing state and so:lal
order of the other side?meaning
m attempt against territorial InegrUy,
aa well aa the organization esntmlng
the role of the government of
.he other side.
"Upon ratification of the present
igreement both contracting parties unlertalie
not to extend their support to
'orelgn military action against the other
side."
TURKISH~SHIP~BRINGS
IMMIGRANTS HERE
Leaves Constantinople Without
Proper Health Bill.
K\t the Ac*ociatetl Peer?.
Coxhtantinoplk, Oct. fl (Delayed).?
Dne thousand (ireek, Armenian and
Jewish emigrants sailed from here tolay
for America on board the Turkish
ship Qui DJemaJ. the first steamship departing
for an American port from Constantinople
since the war.
They left without consent of the
French authorities in control hero, and
n?ny did not hold passports good for
sntry Into the United Spates. Charles
S. Allen, United States Consul in this
lty. Is understood to have notified the
Jtato Department In Washington th*
ttenmer dues not bear r proper bill of
lealtli.
J AH WARDER KIDNAPPED.
f'orU Prison Official llntl Hccn
Blacklisted."'
Cork, Oct.. 1 l.?Tiie first cape, so far
as is known, of an attack on an Irish
prison official occurred yesterday afternoon,
when Thomas Griffin, a warder of
L'urk Jail, was kidnapped while on the
way to his home. Xo trace of him has
Seen found, and the jail authorities expressed
tlie fear to-day that they would
never see him attain. i
It was stated that Griffin was on the
black list." being accused of tormenting
the hunger strikers in Jail by offering
litem food and of mistreating other
prisoners.
.
Cil s Fall Ha
Remarkable
Value at ?
% tax includ;
Dnal opportunity for today i
iat of high quality at a very
i newest shapes; smart shade
Italian grain, Oxford and Ei
D CAPS Hand tailorrd all v
^ quilted silk lining a
' m plain golf or strap
ax included In grey. tan. green ar
Express Elevators direct to
IE MAN'S SHC
AT
Lord & Taylor
FIFTH AVENUE
-THE IS
VILNA NEW THORN
IN SIDE OF LEAGUE
I
Control Commission Fnm
1
Hopeless Task in Move to J
Solve Situation.
|
Hjr LAVRRVCB HILLS,
Staff Correspondent af Tim Hhuu>.
Cofi/rlpht, toto, bp Tin: Nnw York IInatAtH.
Past*. Oct 11.?Th? action of tho
Polish ti?n. Zellgouskl tn seizing VIInn.
In emulation of Gabrlele d'Annunzio's
?ei2ttre of Fiume has created a new feeling
of pessimism regarding the sit nation
In eastern Europe and the Inability of
present agencies to control the war spirit
of these peoples.
The attitude of the Polish military :
party Is still far from reassuring. Gen. 1
Zellgouskl's action Indicates the spirit
pervading aoroa of the Polish army j
chiefs, and the Polish Government of
Marshal Pilsudskl la euspected here of !
having a hand In It.
With the Idea of taking possession of
the city in the name of the League of
Nations, the league's control commission
lias reached Vllna. but the Polish Gen-'
eral can easily defy the league's authority
and chase out the commission if h?
wldhes. The league's commission thus
far lias failed in its mission completely
and continues to give a patent example
of the league's impoteney.
It Is significant that Zellgouskl's act
followed the sending of a joint note to
Poland by Great Britain and France ad(
vising the Poles not to take Vilna, and
; the declaration of the Foreign Affairs
i Commission of Poland that Vilna belonged
to Poland.
Meanwhile the emissaries of Gen.
Baron Peter Wrangel's South Russian
Government are working hard to keep
the Poles from signing peace either wit :
the Lithuanians or the Russians, promising
all sorts of concessions to th~
Poles should Wrongel overthrow the '
Moscow Government. Intrigue of a.i ;
kinds seem to bo at work.
M. Stroude, Gen. Wrangel's Foreign
Minister, reached I'arls to-day and lnand
M. Mukllkoff, the Wrangel ambassador
hero, are trying to get a loan of
800,000,000 francs on the wheat and
, foodstuffs to be exported from Soutn
Russia. All tiie Russian elements her:
are trying to keep the Polish armies in
the field, which would keep Poland from
undertaking the task of making a real
nation of herself.
r ITUTIAMIANS RI.AME
ALLIES FOR SITUATION
Provisional Government Set j
Up at Vilna by Poles.
J1 ' (lie Asaociatml Press.
Ttia.t, Oct. 11.?Tha Lithuanian pit nation.
accentuated by the occupation of
j Vilna, is overshadowing the PolishSoviet
peace conference. The Lithuanians
here have issued a statement attacking
the Poles and the Entente, including
the United States, holding them
! responsible for the sending of supplies to
| Poland.
A Warsaw despatch saya: "The Polish
Government does not associate itself
with this incident (occupation of Vlina)
and is determined not io countenance
any wilful"act on the part of army detachments.
The Polish Government I*
taking all measures in its- power to assert
its authority."
The belief seems to be growing that
the occupation of Vilna 1* another coup
like that of Col. Avaloff-Hermondt of)
Inst year, owing to its similarity to the
Avaloff - Bermondt campaign against
ltlga, which reached tlio banks of the
Dvlna at the city's gates.
Monday's Polish communication on the
situation says: "It is now clear that the
action of Gen. Zellgouski's troops was
provoked by Information from Vilna
ibout repressions end massacres against
noles, especially families of officers and
wddicrs of the Lithuanian and White
llussl&n divisions."
' I I wi 'U I III I. ' ..ur=nl
niiiniimmiiiiHimiTimTTiiTO
M i
EC
?<
k i
ts 1
3 |
KD
and Tuesday to ?~3
low price... All
3 of seal brown,
nglish mixtures.
vool tweeds with
nd one-piece top
and band shapes,
id other mixtures ^
'I
w S s
' :
s
' 9 I
t
fEWT Y?RK_ HERALD.^
Bolsheviki Use Girl as
Executioner in "Bastile"
Special Call* Pripatch to. Thi New
Yobk IIhlii. Copyright, Jtto, bp The i
New Yukic i laiui.u.
pARIS, Oct. 11.?French refugees
repatriated from Russia
tell of the prison of Butirki in
Moscow, which they call the j
"Bastile of Russia." It contains
.1,000 political prisoners, who are
held in revolting promiscuity
with common criminals. Among
them are former Cabinet Ministers,
priests, officers, nobles,
bourgeoisie and workmen, guilty
of offences against the Bolshevik
regime. Lots are drawn from
time to time and the unluckv
ones executed without any form
of trial. The executioner is a
beautiful and fanatical Lettish
girl, 15 years old, who is assisted !
by "two monsters with the muzzles
of beasts." She kills her victims
with a revolver shot in the i
back of the head.
AUSTRIA LIKELY TO
JOIN GERMANY SOON
Ccrfinurd from rirnt Pag*
necessity, if not political, are moro than
Fiance can withstand, as most statesmen
see it. Austria is to-day the ward
of the Entente nations, an economic
monstrosity.
Needing materials to supply her factories.
but unable to supply the crops
to exchange for them, she is now being
carried along by the Reparations Commission.
The Finance Ministry recently
estimated that she could not exist under
present conditions longer than five
years. She cannot produce enough to
feed her population more than five
months in the year, and Vienna, with
3,000,000 population, has virtually no
idnterland.
Vienna is not as much for union with
Germany as the rest of Austria, because
she would like to retain her rank as a
world capital. She is pinning her hope
on the Austrian Reparations Commission,
which is trying to secure enough
raw material on credit to keep the factories
going.
But Austria, ever since her idcpendenco.
lias been artificially stimulated
and is certain to collapse once
this support !s withdrawn. France, unable
to assist her economically, now
sees the whole French diplomatic
scheme for central Europe menaced by
the October plebiscite. The Germans
are working tooth and nail to accomplish
the union. They already own
oli the big newspapers in the Austrian
TVo'i and arc fathering German colonies
which will claim the right of
minorities under the peace treaty.
I uermany ana aubt. uoui raicnu \o
apply to the League of Nations for
membership at Its meeting In Geneva
next month as the first step. If the
league continues to exist, they will
use the plebiscite and the economic
argument to get other nations to demand
that France consent to It. This
Is but a question of time.
l
I II
| S L
For the
I 1
?
15
II
H r4
I
!$ , . ,
g When we say thai this i
S quality?we mean it.
; The statement is based
r; about town.
I* Not only are these suit
A fabric, style and tailoring
r*. Of dark gray, all wool 1
J. work of the average cha
g The pinch back model s<
H
* '
Ijj
1
I I
IS I .
Neatness and sim
rability. Made of
wool body lining.
half belt across ba
!
HERALD SQUARE
i man etueb
" ~*S7Zmmm i 77 nm ffrw . > uTTj
TUESDAY,_ OCTOBER
SOVIET ADMIRAL j
" DEPOSED BY FLEET
Sailors on Baltic Warships
Mutiny?Land Bovolt
Quelled.
i ^
WASiUKOTOK, Oct. 11. -* Mutinous
sailors of the Bolshevist warships in the
Baltic have deposed Admiral Iraskllnikov,
commander of the fleet, according
to reports current along the Baltic coast
and received to-day fcy the State Depart
i ment. Apparently; tlio outbreak occurred
simultaneously in tlie fleet an<l on shore
j at the naval ports, but the revolt on
land was put down by armed forces, it
19 said.
j Disorders reaching the proportions of
revolts also were reported to have occurred
at Saratov, Tambof, Wiasma and
Smolensk. Advices from Poland said
these outbreak# were regarded there as
symptoms of the general unrest In all
districts under Soviet control.
In naval circles the reported revolt of
the sailors suggested that the Soviet
submarines sighted In the Baltic by
Polish supply ships might be manned hy
Altttt;
Moleskir
Neckj
and 1
I
; Made of supple, i
skins, of exquisite
I
j
THE FUR D
Third Floor (Madlis
. fHabtonii Atmra
34tfr *nb 35tl| ^trrrlfi
)?. ?
\
raMiwmip
tl\ /|l
: h
t
Well-Equipped Ci
?all Suit:
1 $41.75
is the lowest price in the cit>
on the most thorough shoppi
V
3 admirable from thy price \
r are such as to please the mo?
worsted. The fabric is durat
mffeur.
:ts off the form just enough to
leavy Overcoat
$49.75
irtness are combined with
all-wool gray fabric. Venel
Double breasted, with com
ick.
Rjr-ZT* fifth floor front
(/(((//
'Sfnc. (S
sjragus MTJ? t
i
T2'_1920l_
some of the" mutineer*, who had started t
on a cruise on their own responsibility. j
London-, Oct. u.?la connection with
the British note to Soviet Russia giving \
notification that any Russian submarines N
encountered 011 the high seas would be ?
attacked on sight by British naval forces =
it appears the only information tbe E
British Admiralty has that Bolshevik 3
submarines are cruising in the Baltic \
ccraea from Bolshevik sources. British e
units which have been doing routine jj
patrol work in tho Baltic for some time :
report they have seen no evidence of
submarines about those waters.
It was stated at tho Admiralty to-day =
that the patrbla would not bo extended f:
to hunt for submarines, but if any were
seen they would bo dealt with an an- ?
nonnced by Earl Curxon in his note.
FLIERS^BODIES FOUND j \
FROZEN ON MOUNTAIN L
Struck Peak in Flight From
Milan to Finland.
Geneva. Oct. 11.?Mystery surround- ^
ing the fate of a Finnish army officer !?
and an Italian pilot flying in a Savoia ~
biplane from Milan to Finland, who lutve ^
been missing since September 7. was ?
solved yestorday when the bodies of the ^
two men were found frozen Buff near ;
the summit of Toctfl Mountain, at an ;
altitude of nearly 13,000 feet.
The machine, which was the property g
of the Finnish Government, was badly p
smashed. It had apparently struck the *
peak head on and was partially burled t
In the snow. |
!
I |j
an Sc (Ho. !
g
P
b Wraps ?
nieces |
Viiufffs I
I
perfectly matched ! I
color and quality
i i
DEPARTMENT
om Avenue section)
p - 3Ftftf? Awwie
Krm fork
I Ir
j r_
\
I '
i p,
j?
' i i '
hauffem |||
s
if
f is
3 h
r for a suit of such high w | 5
ing in the better shops ?
x)int of view, but their ''1 t
;t critical owner.
:>le, in keeping with the ; ?
add grace and smartness. J %
warmth and du:ian
yoke and all' ertible
collar and
h
NEW YORK
1
/ """ ^ \
| I
I S-H-O-E-S |
Price? I
!l o the man of sound judgment,
SUPRE-MACY shoes have a special
appeal. It is agreed that good shoes
should command a fair price. SUPREMACY
shoes have earned the right pj
to be classed as good shoes, in that
they arc all leather with high grade
workmanship and up-to-the-minute <'fj>
stvle. - I
il
ILLUSTRATED %
J |[
is a smart looking vtodel in
black calfskin with me- jij
diutn toes and blind ci/clrfs. ff
d .tejj
$12.89
Tax 29c
fb&irf,I- MnliOB?l??nv. ruth sr.. I?,..ir. . to
J I
I fy? Jf/Yf'H' 9s /ns*d !
rs is* t tf isHERALD
SQUARE <&nc. SS NEW YORK F
ta
h {<?
% #
r' . %
Women's
fl
London Made 1
%
Top Coats
The Season's
R/f _ _ i n l c l r l 3
iyiosl ropuiax opuri V/oat |i
We have just received a new ship- |
ment of top coats from London.
Sturdy tweeds, fleeces, heathers and
plaids in all the smart dark colors. k
Buttons and buckles of leathert
Linings of lambs' wool or silk.
Beautiful tailoring. Perfect in every
detail.
Ideal for motoring, golf or general 8
utility wear all the year around.
E
Moderately Priced From
S $39.75 to $94.75 f
1 , ii
|
Imported Rain Coats |
)%
In Gabardine, crepe de chine, oilskin
and cashmere.
\ $22-74 to $48-75 J I
| Sizes 34 to 44. ij
Third floor, ( rnlrr, Front
I I 1
y/ j?U{(fc// 5
HERALD SQ. Jnr. is NEW 1 OK.v
\ J*
A tM aa ajB & m MM janffiamM-ra & *
r
*

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