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The New York herald. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, October 29, 1920, Image 4

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PROVIDENCE EDITOR
DENIES 'CONFESSION'
Rathom Calls Statement of
Caffey Attempt to Shield
T. D. Roosevelt.
SEKs PETTY POLITICS
&
Real Source of Information
Against Germans Is Still
Secret, He Says.
fpn ial IJ'ipatch to The Nbvp Y<.?k IIuaj o.
Providence, Oct. 2S.?The Providence
Journal to-morrow will print in full the
letter sent by John It. Kathom to At'
orney-General Gregory. which was
made public in New York last night by
Pistrict Attorney Caffey. This letter Is
accompanied by the following comment
from Mr. Kathom:
"Mr. Caffey'a attack on me la an attempt
to turn public attention from the
> barges brought by m?- against Franklin
P. Roosevelt In connection with his
record as Assistant Secretary of the
Navy, which charges stand as I made
them. The only conceivable motive for
this extraordinary and unparalleled attack
at thiji time, by one of the most
iKHvt'rfui departments of the Government
of the United States, is the desire
to gain some petty political advantage
on the eve of a Presidential election.
"The characterisation of litis letter
sii a confession is entirely unfounded and
Is proved false by the language of the
letter itself, to a careful reading of
which I Invite public attention.
"The statement that the letter was
written by men to avoid appearance before
a Grand Jury is a falsehood. I
acceded to the request tor such a communication
because I desired to protect
Hundreds of loyal' citizens who had constantly
given us very Important information.
Neither in the letter nor
subsequently have I disclosed more than
a very few of tho real sources of our
information. an<l those which I disclosed
vere known to the Government before I
wrote the letter.
"The contemptible PfTort to make it
appear that the few entirely superficial
matters touched on by this letter in any
vay affect the character o.r volume of
:he work accomplished by the Providence
Journal during the war is worthy of its
source. 1 wiU present to the public on
Saturday, through the columns of the
Providence Journal, a statement with regard
to tilts entire matter, which will
show something of the record made by
this new?pai>er In connection with its
anti-German activities, tho exact status
>f its loyal and helpful association with
almost every department of the Government
and the innumerable occasions
on which this helpfulness has been
gratefully acknowledged. In some cases
by the very men who have attempted,
by attacking me, to besmirch the reputation
of tho Journal."
FRANKLIN p. ROOSEVELT
BRINGS $500,000 SUIT
Files Libel Action Here
Against Rathom and Others.
The libel action for $300,000 damages
which Franklin D.\ Roosevelt, Assistant
Secretary of the Navy and nominee oi
I he Democratic party for t^ce-Prestdent,
announced he would bring against
John It. Rathom, Scott <"?. Bone and
Kdward I!. Clark. was fHad -yesterday
n the Supreme Court. Ho charge* the
defendants with falsely and maliciously
defamlnc him.
Bone Is manager anil Clark U assistir.t
manager of the publicity bureau of
he Republican National Committee.
Ha thorn Is publisher of the Providenc e
Journal. On October 22 last the Providence
Jovrnal published an open letter tc
Roosevelt which, it is alleged, was
based upon tho defendants' fulsc Information.
Tho publication charged Roosevelt
with having abstracted papers iron
the official files of tbo Navy Department
relating to the case of C. A,
Parker. There was alio :i genera1
charge that Roosevelt had allowed
nuni convicted of crimes to roenllst In
the navy and that he had boasted in
'MS that he controlled the votes of
navy yard employees.
( OU MBIA Ci. O. P. MKETINO.
Henry W. Taft. Jacob Gould Schurman.
former president of Cornell lrni
versify, and Prof. Samuel McCunc I.lnd
say are among those who will speak a
,i Republican mass meeting to be held it
th" Columbia Pnlversity gymnasium ai
* o'clock to-night.
FRANKLIN SI
LEONARDO da VTNCI
Wearmooi
V
A DOUBLE
in heavy
blue and heath
at the olive?i
Flannel lined,
deeper in the
for hoys is?V
* Jn
Fi
i. II I I. D R 1. N
HARDING SOUGHT !l
TO STOP CARTOON ]
I' I
Emphasizes His Attitude of'
Disapproval in a ' i
Statement.
r j1
RECALLS NO VANDERLIP \
3
jCertain He Gave No. Letter,!
concerning tsiDman t
Matter.
t
? . |
| i>M" "I Despatch to Titr Nnw York lluum. I
! Akron, Oct. 28.?Senator Harding to- j 1
lay issued two statements, one dealing . i
! wltli the Iteld cartoon In. Harveit's 1
j Weekly, which has caused a great doaJ j 1
t of unfavorable comment, and the other i
taking up In detail his denial of any i
part in the activities of Washington D. i
( Vnnderllp in Hussla. The statement <
I' follows: <
"My attention has been called to the
Reid cartoon, published In Harvey'? <
! Weekly, . portraying the Democratic 1
nominee in the difficult task of hanging ]
a''portrait of Uncle Sam with the heart i
of the covehar.t, Of course a candidate ,
: has no part in the exercise of the free- ,
Join of the press, but X not only do not j
approve of this cartoon but weeks aoa>
{ I came In possession of an advanced i
! copy In rov capacity as a publisher and
j Immediately asked our newspaper at !
Marlon to wire and request Its supprea- i
i slon.
j "Believing as I do in the fulness of 1
i religious freedom In America, 1 am always
sensitive about giving offence to
' any religious reverend?, and the recommendation
to destroy tlfe cartoon in
j question was made when It was clearly
an expressed conviction which conveyed
my views without a thought of making
a political appeal. I do not believe that i
either Cartoonist Reld or Harvey's
Weekly intended any offence, but since It :
Is a matter of public discussion I do <
want my own attitude of disapproval <
made emphatic."
Senator Harding was Informed toj
day of the substance of London despatches
received by the Philadelphia
Public Ledger concerning the operaI
Hons of Washington D. Vonderllp In
I Russia and Siberia. Vanderlip Is alI
leged to havo claimed to represent
Senator Harding In negotiations with
j the Soviet Government. These negoi
tiatlons are described by the Public
) Ledger despatches as in part having I
to do with concessions In Siberia, and
| in part concerning international polltlI
cal affairs.
| Senator Harding declared lie had no
j recollection of ever giving any sort of
I' letter to Vanderlip. whom ho said he
did not know and did not recall ever
meeting.
! "If he ever got 'a letter from me."
i said the Senator, "which T am positive
j he did not, It could not have been
more than a purely formal note, given
It urn ic>iy>.-3l. ?>t nuiiio 14 icim. 1.444.1
I am very certain that no such letter
even as tliat war ever given. Of
course, Vanderllp Is In no way my
agent or representative; p have no
| agents and I never heapl of this
! matter until it appeared recently In
j news reports."
' Senator Harding's secretary, George
! P.. Christian, said that while he did
j rot have at hand the flies of Senator
I Harding's correspondence during the
1 session of Congress, those files being
in Washington. he was absolutely certain
no letter of any sort was ever
' g'.ven to Vanderllp.
FRANCE WON'T MODIFY
LEAGUE OF NATIONS
S | ??
Official Denial of Change in
Case Harding Is Elected.
Paris, Oct. 28.?The Foreign Office to'
day took cognisance of the reports circulated
In the United .States as to alleged
> plans of the French Government follow1
ing the American election, and lAued a
denial in the form of tho following official
statement:
' "Certain American publications In the
1 past few days have printed reports ac'
cording to which the French / Government's
intention was to raoRT) its Am'
bussador in the event of and as soon as
1 a Republican President assumed office.
The new envoy, .it was reported, would
1 have Instructions to meet tho Republican
viewpoint concerning the League of 'Nations,
and also try to roach an alliance
of s6me kind between the United Htntes
and France. A new association of na
tions was alleged to be the policy of the
- new Ambassador, in which the two great
- republics would play predominant parts,
t ' Such Information Is absolutely groundi
less. Ambassador Jusseratid leaves on
November 13 to resume the duties of his
post at Washington."
MON BOYS' SHOPS? I
, painter, sculptor, architect, musician, ei
displayed phenomenal talent at a boy.
Overcoats for !
000 Instead of *2'
qA Saving of **
-BREASTED, button-to-neck
a11-,\vool overcoatings, brow
icrs. (Even if you want brov
t*s our choice!?you never sat
and so modeled and made as I
public mind thaf the only &
VEARMOOR! Sizes 3 to rt
inklm Simon t
ftli Avenue, j7th and 3-8th Street
HAIRCUTTING SHOP ?
THE
HARDING SEES NEED
FOR G 0. P. CONGRESS;
I
Continued from First Pa<je
lean party bacli to service In the ration.
Phe American people have always turned
o the Republioan party In their hour of
inxiftty and distress, and ure turning to
t this year for relief at Washington and
hroughout our t governmental instltulons.
"I have a very strong conviction that'
fmi firn ?T>lho> tn ?lM>r <a norMihllmn :u
^resident of the United Status. But I
vara you, don't do tt unless you Intend j
0 put the Republican party In power In j
be Congress us well as In the Executive
>fflee.
"There Is a very unusual Bltuatlon In
he world. Humanity Is trying to find
tself once more. Civilisation lias been
n ?, state of flux, and no mar. cr woman
snmvs yet what the cryetalisation is
tohig to be on the morrow. It wo ttie to
tave a preserved civilization. If the i
vorld la going to f?oe about on the
Ight forward track again, there is a j
great responsibility on our Republic, ;
shore we have proven representative
iemocraey, to point a safe and sane way
for aspiring mankind.
"I would not want to be your President
unless you are going to give us a
Republican Congress to translate Republican
promises into legislative enactments.
If I am going to serve you I <
want the Government to have the ma- j
rhlnery with which to serve, and I '
promise you that under Republican ail
ministration the Congress in going to \
resume Its constitutional functions, tt
Is very Important to have a majority in
the United States Senate, and you ough'
always to think of the Senate as saving
tt you your American liberty. Don't'
be distressed about the so called Senatorial
oligarchy. There Isn't any. X
think we would have succeeded this
year In harmonising the Senate Into a
completely useful agent If It had not
been for the Interference- of the Chlof
Executive, who was r.ot sfttisfled with
running his own end of Pennsylvania
avenue.
"We ought to have been thinking
more of the Constitution and lest" of thr
covenant. We ought to have been concerned
with American nationality^ not.
paralyzing hiternatlonallty. We ought
to have been concerned with America's
pr.'lcy for America and not a European
policy for the United States of America
We ought to have been giving atten- j
tlon to our problems at home, to putting
he American house In order, Instead of
trying to build a temple tof super- j
government across the sea.
Siauii Never ('banged.
" 'Oli.' they say, 'you cannot tell !
where Harding stands on the league.' :
V>11, let me seo If I can tell you where 1
1 stand. I am at least entitled to speak ;
for myself. 1 have been speaking slnee i
the 22d of last July, and X challenge any j
Democrat in America, high or low, to ,
find V contradiction in anything I have j
sn id.
"We do deeply and sincerely eym- !
pathize, but when we came to look into |
tho situation?and I apeak officially, be
cause it was my fortune to be the chairman
of the committee that held hearings
on the subject?we found that acceptance
of -an American mandate for Ar- ',
menla would require from 70,000 to i
100,000 American boys, to be planted '
nearly 6,000 miles away. In tho very j
gateway between Occident and Orient,
In tho pathway of all the wars since
recorded civilization began: planted 1
over there to involve America in all the
conflicts of envy and Jealousy and rivolrv
iin.l rent lilies nld hatreds of the
Old World. 1 tell you, my countrymen,
wo arc not going Jo do It.
"Then, there wag Article X., which Is
a very simple ,thing, they nay?proclaimed
'The Heart of the League.' I
know It Is the heart of the league-?the
sCbel heart, hidden beneath a coat of
mail. Article X. creates a world government.
puts America in alliance with
four great Powers to rule the world by
force of arms and commits Arwcrlca to
give her sons for all the battle fields
of the Old World. It says member n?tlons
undertake to respect the territorial
Integrity of each other and to preserve
that territorial integrity from outside
aggression, and it further provides that
the couhcii of tbe league shall advise as
to how this compact shall be carried out.
I have not quoted the words literally,
but nobody will challenge my oppression
of the meaning of Article X.
"Some people say: "Mr. Harding, you
are wrong. American armies cannot be
sent abroad without the authority of
Congress.' 1 agree that that in a fact,
if we live under the Constitution. But
we have sent them?we sent them Into
Russia without a declaration of war.
But the covenant would become the basic
contract of America. We would plight
our faith with the Old World, Suppose
the Council of the league were to make
a call and wo failed to respond? This
republic would be stained with national
dishonor; and I do not want a contract
for America that wo do not intend to
keep. I want to tsa^e American boys
and American honor at the same time. I
P I F T II FLOOR
lgtnccr and philosopher,
Small Boys
7.50
7.50
model, tailored
n, olive, gray,
vn, take a look
v such a coat!)
:o establish still
?ing in clothes
> yearn
ICO:
S
FIFTH FLOOR
t
NEW YORK HERALD,
want America to decide, not according
to a compact with the world, but in accordance
with American conscience,
Nrrer Failed the World.
' America has never failed the world.
Talk about deserting our allies! Why,
we never had any alliance with tl>eni.
We did not go to war to remake' the
world ; we went to war to save our present
civilisation and protect American
rights. If v* had been making warfare
for democracy, we ought to have speeded
up a little. If we were making war for
humanity's suite, we ought not to have
postponed it until so many of humanity
had been s&criflct-d.
"I believe In keeping out of wnr; and
I believe In keeping out of war not only
In campaign years. but In the years between
campaigns. I want to see the
world approximate to disarmament.
Somebody has said: 'Here Is the spectacle,
this great republic deserting our
allies, deserting suffering humanity in
the Old AVorld ; America Is falling to keep
ner ituki. i ?unucr u 11 nuuiu nui jicip i
If I stopped right here to quote from ur '
English writer?who woe not writing for i
the American campaign?about some
things America is doing for the world,
for the cause of human uplift. I am
quoting from the London Spectator:
A British View.
" There is an Impression In many
minds that America has failed Europe,
refused to ratify the treaty and withdraw .
from participation In the great work of
reconstruction. In other words, has pra?- ]
tlcally abandoned her former allies in ,
their time of greatest need. Yet what Is i
the actual fact? America haa been doing <
more for the relief and reconstruction
of Europe than all other Powers put to- i
gether. This is a bold statement, but ;
from prrsoMtl experience and observe- /
tion 1 hellIt to bo absolutely beyond i
dispute, ana probably the measure of her '
help Is only feebly indicated by that com- 1
parlson. I
"Since the armistice I have visited <
the most of the countries between Asia <
Minor and Denmark, and betwesn the I
English Channel and the Baltic prov- '
lnces. Everywhere I have found social
service agencies from America working 1
along unostentatious lines. There is no regard
for nationality, race, religion, or
politics, but simply the recognition of
human need. The American Is positive,
practical, constructive, and any tiling that !
touches his sympathy makes a strong ap- 1
peal to his idealism. It demonstrates,
however, that America Is not standing
out. of the work or abandoning the
Allies, but, on the contrary, America la '
in it up to the neck, saving lives heal- !
lng the nick, clothing the naked, feeding j
tho hungry, especially women and chll- i '
dron ; bringing more than a ray of hope,
comfort and sunshine into a sorely
ruvfched world, and winning the gratitude
of millions upon millions of un- !
fortunate people who have had no share
or influence In bringing about the dis- '
aster which has come upon them.
"It is not too much to say that '
America and Americans arc doing more
than all other countries combined, and
doing It In a way that must win the
admiration of all who have had the opportunity
of seeing this true spirit of
America and how she Is trying to cope
with the desperate situation In the world.
The Aonl of Amerlen.
That Is the soul of America, my
countrymen. Talk about breaking the
heart of the world! America is healing
the heart of the world. But even If the
heartbreaking tragedy were true, I
would rather break the heart of the ]
world than destroy the soul of American
nationality.
"I have said front July 22 to now, <
and 1 repeat It to you, andvl know I
| speak what is In your hearts?America
means to play her part 1n a new relation- |
j ship among the nations of the wdrld. j
j America does not object; she wants an
' association of nations. America wants
j to bring the world conscience to com|
mnn understanding. Amertcan wants to
I turn the light of world opinion on probj
able controversies or causes of conflict, i
I America wants to Join the nations of
j the world In promoting and preserving
i peace. I have said I favor that sort of
thing; I say If now. But I will never
' have it at the cost of surrendering
' American sovereignty. I will never have
I It at the cost of surrrend?ring American
i freedom, or American honor, or American
pride In accomplishment, or American
independence of action.
"And I know, my countrymen, that
the world, noting the failure of the
Paris league?which is existing, but
not functioning?the world, recognising
that American leadership Is essential
MMmmSBBsiKiszsii m
1
I GOLF
I Here Is G
| Dunlop \
I Golf
I$9.94
You know the regular pr
know the Dunlop Golf
to tell you of the saving!
There are only 200 do
come -first serve" is the
| 9&U(a
^ HERALD SQUARE
\
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21
Jj lU'
EREDERICKKEPPEL<SS|
I
A Memorial Exhibition
of Etchings by
AimtDC 7flD*I
AlWLIW Z.I/IX1N
j
October 14 th 4
to
November 6th
1920
4EaST397^T.NEWY0RK |
H' r j
ind muet bo bad If -wo are to have a.
workable association among nations, to I
>? directed by the light of juettce rathor |
lian the sword of force, expects America I
:o take the lead, and wo are willing
.o do It. |
"I have ha id repeatedly, and I say i
low?and you find tin inconsistency If
fou can?that nfter X am elected I am
going to consult the leadings, minds of
ill America; I am going to consult the
women as well as the men. If there
s going to be a new and Ideal condition
In the world we want something
if woman's Intuitions and Reparations
therein. And reactionary and old fashon.
a as It is. I am going to consult and
id vise with the United States Senate.
"Our problem, with the world turning
to us for leadership und expecting
America to point the way. Is first to
harmonize sentiment In America and
(Ind out from the meeting of many
minds what this country is -willing to!
stand hack of and support. I cannot
tell you this moment precisely what that
Is. I can only- promise you that when
we come Into power we will seek to
play our part, and we will lead the
world without in any way sacrificing
the essentials of America. Then we j
will give of our abundance, our influence.
our example, aye, of our com- j
manding position in the world, to a!
new order that looks toward -disarma-1
ment and to maintaining and preserving !
the peace of the world. But I promise- j
vou, ny countrymen, none of this at the |
?xpense ^of surrendering the 'American I
*onseien?: none of this nt the cost of I
>uhstltutlng some conglomerate thing for I
the Stars and Stripes of our"own United
States of America."
ETPKCT 20,000 HOTBIj ME\.
More than 20.000 hotel men are expected
here tor the thirty-fourth annual < on- |
vention of the New York State Hotel <
Mhn's Association, to ho held during the
week November 8 to 13 In Grand Central
Palace in conjunction with the Fifth
National Hotel Men's Exposition. A
meeting of the executive committee yes- ,
terday fixed the date and the place.
PURE MARACAIBO
cojm;
FRESH
WHOLESALE M % o i
ROASTER L(X
IN 5 I.B. I.OTS OR MORF. (BEAN OK
OICOI ND) ON ( ASH AND CARRY rl.AN
.Vatlsfy your coffee taste with tlio rich
totnptlriK flavor of this pure, wholesome
and delicious coffer.
voc f<Avr ior. i?.
Delivered in (Jreater N"W York aniloo. il
within aOO rr.llra at otC ll>.
Satisfaction Otinrantecd or Money Rack.
OPES EVERY PA Y US'Til. 5.30 P.M.
G LL.E CO .<1 EE CO.
?:(3-2rf) Wa*liln*lon street. New York
Itetween Park Place ami Barclay St.
Phono Barclay 0857. Bat. 80 Years.
'"V
ERS! |
ood News
,?v :
Jac "31" |
Balls |
dozen 1
'ice of these balks. You jj:
Balls. No need for us 'f:
5. j> *
zens of them. ''First |
; hile.
>
lion, flfili Moor, Centre.
11
cu & ?c. I
o. <y NEW YORK ,*6
?uJ'
u ^tiv' u n it ktji iTJi ir.ii u Fuji xlu iLRLXLlt
* ' - ' .
1920* ' j
I mff^^nfelitt 5tmon & j
? -:ft ^ Si ore of Individual Shops ?
?3 1 ??3.
g FIFTH AVF.NUIv-,f7M and 3S,h Street.. ?|
@ , '.* > <?J
g Wool Jersey Frocks For ?
j? (firIs Prove Their ?j
1 In Wear . |
I ' I2.75 1
? A *b.m saving on this season 's price.
? DARK COLORS FOR 1
1 Pftl SCHOOL WEAR, LIGHT 1
| COLORS FOR DRESS g
i L&li WEAR, WINTER 'WEIGHT ?
g IP^ FOR COLD WEATHER I
I - WEAR-AND WEAR- ?
I ' PROOF TEXTURE ... ?
' ' ?3
(?) ?
A girlish model of wool jersey, stitched ??
a in gay worsted yarn, distinguishes itself in s
P< style and indicates the many other values. ?
r> o ^ i /? ^
g e>izes n 10 14 years.
? * @
g; Navy Blue, Reindeer or Copenhagen g
? Other Wool Jersey Crocks 18:s0 to 39. so "
iSV'rrr 6 to 16 years '
0 "0
|g[ ^ GIRLS' DRESS SHOP? Second /-/W '
O A STORK OF INDIVIDUAL SHOPS SlB HU H AVK.,J7th AN0 38th SI'S. ?
? ' ?:
S <ntmAfi o /Trt ?3 I
g JJ V UIII\IUI /VUIIVII w g
? f II
?j Back and Belted g
@ Front in a Gray Squirrel ?
1 Qollared Suit for Misses Jj
U ^ W I
kg To-morrow's fashion ?5
g> for to-day's service? * @
g; next season's price @
1"?-/ l/\%? 4-Uir* f?rvnr Ar> rn t rmnr I F
JU4 iui 11 lis sca^uii ^ ^avni^j
11 A NEW LOOSE BOX BACK SUIT & fj
jg OF DUVpT DE LAINE WITH j||LJ? @
j| VERTICAL RIDGE,TUCKS, g
S STITCHED POCKETS, AND A H i
y. GENEROUS GRAY SQUIRREL WlYV.Jf 53 !
|| FUR COLLAR ?
1 79> . , 8
@ /I *15 saving on this winter's price ^ Si
t~i. Malay Brown, Navy Blue or Dryad. ?3
? Silk lined and warmly interlined. S.
jsci * w
j|j Other Fijk Trimmed Suits . . . . 49.50 to 345.00 |s
fe? Sizes /a to 20 years Q
pV ' i
MISSES* SUIT SHOP?Second Floor \ g|
An Advertisement in the Lost and Found Columns of THE NEW
YORK HERALD offers a repl possibility of recovering your lost 'i
a. 1

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