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The New York herald. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, March 07, 1921, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045774/1921-03-07/ed-1/seq-7/

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MRS. STEIN DEL IS '
WAR GRIEF SUICIDE
3foted Pianist Never Recovered
From Accusations Against
Loyalty.
DIKS IN LAKE MICHIGAN
Bruno, Her Husband. Forced
From Chicago Orchestra for
Similar Reason.
Special De:-i--at<h to Tuc N?w T..?k Hkivib.
Chicago, March Suffering from a
usrvous collapse, brought on. accord
ing to relatives. by charges made
against hrr loyalty to tho V nited
States during tho war, Mrs. Mathilda
Steindel. noted pianist and wife of >
Bruno Steindel, world famed cellist,
committed suicide some time Satur
day. Her body was taken from Lake ,
Michigan at the foot of Farwell street,
on the North Shore, to-day.
Three years ago, in the summer of
1918, the loyalty of the Steindels was
questioned. Both > re talien before
District Attorney Clyne and Mr. Stein
del w is compelled to resign as princi
pal cellist of the Chicago Symphony ;
Orchestra, a position he had held for
twenty-seven years.
The illness of Mrs. Steindel, of an
intense temperament, dates from that
time. Her mental condition waB ag
gravated also by long worry over her
daughter. Eleanor, 13. the victim of a 1
mysterous malady which specialists had
been unable to fpkgnose. The ?irl has ,
been confined to her bed for years.
"If anything happens to Eleanor I
will kill myself," she had toll friends. |
The girl is now reported to be on the
road to recovery.
Bruno Steindel, who refused to rejoin j
the Chicago Symphony Orchestra after
he was exonerated of the disloyalty
charges, is now on a tour with the
Chicago Opera Company.
Mrs Steindel passed Friday night
with Mrs. William Rich of Evanston, her
cousin. She awoke at 6 o'clock, and
moved restlessly through the house,
"She seemed very depress##" saifi
Mrs. Rich yesterday. "She told mo j
then, 'I can't stand it; I can't stand it;
1 am got: g mad.' "
She left Mrs. Rl< h at 4 o'clock in
the afternoon.
Mrs. Steldel's automobile was seen
this morning at the foot of Farwell
avenue. The lights were on. The body
was about 100 feet from shore.
The disloyalty charges agalrst Mr.
and Mrs. Steindel were made by Walttfr
Fermer, second 'cellist with the Sym
phony Orchestra, and Julius Farm an.
who said Steindel hud refused to stand
during the playing of the "Marseillaise."
At the same time Joseph Zettleman,
Richard Kuss and William Hebs, num
bers of tho orchestra, were und^r Are,
as was Frederick Stock, its director. All
the musicians were summoned to appear
before Assistant Distr.ct Attorney
Francis Borelli, August 10. 191s.
Mrs. Steindel also appeared. She was
questioned regarding itn Incident In a
music store, when she is said to have j
refused a patriotic song, saying, it was j
chargi'd. "I was born in Germany."
Mr. Steindel resigned from the or
cheatra October 2 of the same year. |
Mrs. Steindel became 111, and for a time
was in a sanitarium at Milwaukee. She
dropped a note out of the window one
day asking that its finder inform her
relatives she could not stand the con
finement. She then was taken out of
the Institution and returned to Chicago.
LINERS TO GET FREIGHT
DIRECT FROM CARS
N. Y. C. and Belgian Line
Avoid Double Handling.
The Lloyd Royal Beige and the New'
York Central Railroad announced yes
terday an agreement to eliminate doubl"
handling of freight by loading it from
the cars to the steamships direct. * The 1
arrangement Involves the use of Pier 90.
at the foot of Fifty-ninth street. North
River, owned by the New York Central.
The dock is equipped with trackage, and j
food and similar cargoes will be brought
dire< : to the pierhead, where they will
be loaded into the holdti of the Belgian
vessels..
J; Is expected the plnn will do much
to prevent spoilage and breakage. The
same method will be employed in un
loading shipments from the other side.
The reduction in shipping cost* will, it
ia believed, reach a considerable percent
age of the total of handling.
STABS TO AID BOYS CLUB.
Mini Flormer Knxton Among
Thone to Take Part In flenetit.
Mlse Florence Easton of the Metro
politan yesterday volunteered to sing at
the annual entertainment for th? Buys
Club of New York at the Hippodrome
next Sunday evening. Her appeartnei
In by permission of Mr. GaUi-Casaxzn.
who Is In sympathy with the work be
ing done by the Boys Club for its 7.000
member*, the majority of whom live in
the so-call?d gas house district.
In additfort to Mme Easton, Jlmr
Emma Trentinl will sing; so will Tit"
flchipa, tenor of the Chicago Opera
Company.
D. W. Griffith, motion picture pro
ducer, Will photograph an import mt
scene from his new production, "Dream
tftreet," on the stage, usln(t a specially
constructed studio, with complete equip
ment. Among those who will tppear In
this scene are Carol I>em|(ptir, Tyron<
Power, Ralph Graves, Charge Mack and
W. J. Ferguson More than tv < nty of
America's h?-st known stage .star- also
will appear, among these being Frank
liacon, Holbrook Bllnn, Hpem.er Char
ters. Miss Ruth Chatttrton, Miss Ruth
Draper, J,eon Errol, William Faverr
ham, Lew Fields. Miss Ruth Findlav,
Mrs. Fiske's company. Ben Ait Hagglt).
Miss Dorothy Keane, Howard I.ang, Miss
Carroll McComas. Mltrl, Ml^s Leitr4|je
Taylor, Chic Sale and Julius Tnnn>>n.
Amonf those who already have ob
tained box. a are Mr p. rcy A. Rockefeller,
Mr. Albert H. Wiggln, Mrs. E. Henry
Warrlmnn. Mrs. Robert Ha. on. Mr and
Mr*. Charles H. Sahln, Mr. Cliaiies fi.
Dillingham. Mr and Mrs. r, B. Adams,
Mr, nnd Mrs. Iternon s. Prentice, Mr.
and Mrs. George Whitney, Mr. and Mrs.
drfcyson M. P. Mirphy, 1. and Mr?
Thomas H. Frotlilnghsm, Mrs < >irdt n H.
Hammonrl, Mr. and Mrs, E. Roland N.
Harrlinau and Mr. and Mrs. William
Pott* r.
KILLED AT ELECTRIC SWITCH.
Workman's llend Brnshr* titnlnut
kiponed lieyhonrrt.
Edward Relbln, 34, an i| rltian
stood on a box to inspect a sw ivhboar !
nit?e feet from the flo>.r st the Tebo's
Yacht Bnsln. in Brooklyn, yesterdny
and, satisfied with the inspection, started
to nt? p down from th< box. His head
brushed one of til" Closed keys of the
switchboard. and a current of *,?no
volts went through Ms body. The cur
rawt neirly the body afire. Dealt
tv*a Immediate.
ETHEL BARRYMORE SILENT
ON REPORTED SEPARATION
All Inquirers Are Referred to Her Attorney, Who
Leaves Word That He Has No Statement to
Make?One May Be Given Out To-day.
AU inquirers seeking' information re- of the hospital. Even information as to
*urdin?t the report t?;at Miss EV; '. ! the condition of Miss B:i rrymore's health
Barry in or? is about to seek a perm?- ! wits refused. When asleep if she had
nent n?p. ration from her h::.iband, Itus-i improved one of the attendants Mid:
S4ii GriwwoW Colt, were told yesterday j "You'll have to sisk h( r lawyer; we can't
that a statement nilffht be issued some- 1 tell you anything1."
time this afternoon through Miss Bajrr.v- 1 At Mr. Cromwell's residence it was
more's attorney. William Nelson Croni-! said he had left word that he would
well, at his office, 4M Wall street. have no comment to make upon the case
At Flower Hospital, where the actress ! in the course of the day or nitrht.
\$ convalescing from a throat operation, Miss Barrymore's two brothers, John
ft \v:i? said she had read the accounts ! ainl Lionel, could not be reached yes
in ! ho new xpap<-rs of h r reported usrday. Her undo, J"hn Drew, had
estrangement from her husband, but that tfone out of town. Neither eould Mr.
sin- wr . !il make 110 comment. Colt be found. His father, Samuel Colt,
"All statements will have to come who is chairman of the board of trus
through Miss H<vrryn?ore's attorney," tees of the United State* Kubber Coin
was tln> information Klven at the office I pany, lives lit Providence.
SIX NEW TYPHUS CASES;
25 IMMIGRANTS HELD
Only One Fresh Sleeping Ill
ness Patient Is Reported.
Fi.-o new casts of typhus were discovr
erod veiitcrday among the Immigrants
wlio arrived here more than a month
ago on the Italian liner San Gulsto and
a sixth east- was taken from the lte.l
Star steamship Kroonland, which ar
rival Thursday. The latter is Carroll
DfZ.?rle, a Hungarian woman, and is the
firm new case to enter the country for
several weeks. Dr. Lcland H. Cofer.
Health Officer of the Port, had the six
patients isolated with about forty others
already on Swinburne Island.
The Health officials thinlc they may
have found a st-venth ease m Jacob
Pilling of 26." SeventVi avenue, who was
sent to Bellevue Hospital from 114 Park
Row yesterday afternoon L*ast night he
developed symptoms of typhus and was
sent to an isolated ward.
The Health Department examined
1,827 immigrants at Grand Centra!
Terminal, Pennsylvania Station and the
Battery during the day and sent twenty
five of them to Willard Parker Hospital
for treatment.
Only one new cace of sleeping sickness
was reported yesterday. There were no
deaths
JAMAICA BAY USED BY
U. S. AS AN ANCHORAGE
40 to 60 Government Freight
ers to Tie Up There.
The United States Government has
begun to use Jamaica Bay as an anchor
age for its round the world freigters.
Kour of them are moored there now,
having been taken through Rockaway
Inlet by Sandy Hook pilots unaer the
supervision o<" Capt. O. 'O. W. Parker,
superintendent of the marine department
of the United States Shipping Board.
The bay will be used as an anchor Age
for from forty to sixty Government ves
sels -rhile they are waiting for cargoes,
a Shipping Board survey showing there
are accommodations for as many \ ease's
of from 5,000 to 10,000 tons. The sav
ing to the Government from the u? of
Jamaica Bay is estimated At about
$1,500,000 a year.
Congres-s appropriated $7,500,000 .or
the improvement of Jamaica Bay, and
of this sum only about $400,000 haj b?cn
expended. The city appropriated $1,000,
000 in connection w4th the contract, but
has expended only some $200,oOO.
PENNSY MAKES RECORD
IN PASSENGER SERVICE
Eastern Schedule Was Seldom
Broken in January.
The Pennsylvania Railroad announced
vesterday that a new record for passen
ger train service in the Eastern region
of the system had been established dur
ing January. In this month, according
to the report. 81.713 passenger trains
were operated. Of the total trains run
01.7 per cent, arrived at destination on
time and 96.8 per cent, made schedule
time. *
In connection with January nl last
year, the report shows that not only
were more passenger trains operated in
the same month this year, but the num
ber arriving on time and maktng sehed*.
ule time shows a marked improvement.
All of the eighteen divisions included in
the Eastern region report an improve
ment this year in the movement of pas
senger trains.
TIDEWATER BOATMEN
VOTE WAGE CUT STRIKE
Waterfront Workers Asked
to Boycott All Barges.
Member* of the Tidewater Boatmen's
Union, a local of the International Long
shoremen's Association, unanimously
voted Inst night to go out on strike
Thursday mornlnc The strike vote was
tsken after it was announced at th*
meeting, which was held in 164 Eleventh
avenue, that the New York Boat Owners'
kMOCUtlon had announced a wag'l re
duction of $20 a month for all tidewater
boatmen.
John Brennan. president of tne union,
ho presided at the m-eting, said a gen
, nil call had been issued to ait water
front workers to stand bv the tidewater
boatmen and to do no work on barges
,-f,, (,.(1 by the strike, lie said the strlk
ii g boatmen would have the full support
of the longshoremen during the strike.
TO CONFER ON RAIL WAGE.
First Meetln* A Section I osUlllert
Men t?? Start To-morrow.
Pinal touches are being added to the
proposals which will be submitted by
railroad executives to representatives of
unskilled railroad labor in an important
nr-rles of conference* which begin to
morrow. P.eductlone of about 10 per
cent. In wages will be asked by the exec
utives, the new schedule* to apply a*
soon as possible to unskilled labor on
the road* In Eastern territory. Approx
imately 200.000 are Involved In the pro
p.*.d readjustment. The present scale
Ik cents an hour.
.Notices were rent out by the railroads
to their men lost week, following a meet
ing of the general.managers. The Bos
ton and Albany and New Haven confer
etvren rnke place to-morrow On Thurs
day N?w Vork Central employees will
confer with their executives; on Prlday
the Lehigh Valley conference will be
held at Bethlehem. The meeting of Jer
sey Centra! employees Is scheduled^ for
r xL Monday, followed on Ma roll IS by
the Heading and Lackawanna confer
INSTRUCTION. COLLEGES, &C.
m:< omk a iM)' T?>it
of Chlroprn-Mr ?n?l win f! social and soela
prestlS'"; faculty anrt eurrlc'.iliim unsurpassed.
Writ* for flenrrlptlv h< <>k)et H.
M'.tV YOWK rOI.I.HOR or CtllHOPKAC'TH'.
A N. Y. C C. Ornrtnate suerce?|"> whero others
fall. Thcs's a 1t<sion.
24S \Ves? "tnd <?.
nn ITT M IIIHII It w?? 45th Nlrrel.
Hn I I H'-> ? -tsrlsl 'raining: Individual
nn I i r. wM<f f<.?- ffstsiot
V ,11!VII Spaniard would egehange flpafii'h
conversation f?r KnsIWi neat sptwstrsncr
nimble reference*. L? *2 lit raid. Herald I
I
HOOVER AIDS RADIUM
GIFT TO MME. CURIE
Mrs. Coolidge on Committee
to Raisa $100,000 Fund.
The Marie Curie Radium Fund Com
I mlttee made public yesterday a letter
j Herbert Hoover, Secretary ^>f Commerce,
sent recently to Dr. \ erno'n Kellogg of
I the -National Research Council, Wash
ington, indorsing the movement to pre
| sent a gramme of radium to Mnte.
I Curie. The letter follows ;
I am very glad to leam that Mine.
i Curie is to visit this country in May
I and that the women of America plan to
I present her at the time of her visit
I w ith a gramme of radium for her use
in carrying on her Investigations.
Mme. Curie is the foremost living
woman of seence, and her work has been
not only of great scientific importance
l>ut of immense immediate value to
mankind. Any recognition and support
ot this wonderful woman and her work
that can be given by the women of
America meets with my warmest ap
proval."
The gramme of radum will cost $100,
000. The committee raising the fund
to purchase it includes in it* member
ship Mrs. Calvin Coolidge, wife of the
\ ice-President; Mrs. Carrie Chapman
Catt, Mrs. Willard Straight. Mrs. Cor
nellus Vandcrbilt and Mrs. Frederic R.
Coudert.
HIDES FROM POLICE;
INHALES GAS; DIES
Workman Goes Home Drunk
and Tears Out Fixtures.
Mrs. Minnie Streeter of 318 West
I 115th stre t telephoned to the West 123d
j street station last night and said that a
j roomer in her home, Fred Small, a glase
| blower, had come home drunk and had
I created a disturbance. She asked that a
j policeman be sent to arrest him.
Patrolman Herman Stofter found
| Small sitting on the landing of the sec
ond floor. He started up after the man,
but Small yelled:
! "Keep away from me or you'll get
hurt!"
Stoffer telephoned to the station for
! assistance and he was joined by Pa
trolmen Moe Muisorf and James Nenetz,
j who came in a patrol wagon. When
Small saw the thiee policemen enter the
I house he ran into the bathroom and
| locked the door. Then he began tearing
the fixtures from the walls. The p?
i trolmen forced the door open, captured
him and took him to the police station.
He was sent to Harlem Hospital in an
| amlUance, but was dead when the hos
pital was reached.
Pr. Brandsteln of the hospital medical
^taff said Small died of alcoholism and
i mp poisoning. It i.s supposed that he
inhaled the gas in the bathroom after
tearing the fixtures from the wall. Mrs.
| Streetei told tho police that the man
! had been drinking for a week.
$1,000 COCA INE SEIZED ;
TWO ARRESTS MADE
Man and Woman, Both
Aliens, Are Prisoners.
i Cocaine said to be valued at $1,000
was selied yesterday by Detective
Woods of the West Thirtieth street
j police station, at 121 West Thirty
fourth street. Two arrests were made,
j One of the prisoners. Mama Macardo,
2C years old, had a revolver, and a
Portuguese permit to carry It. With
J him was a woman, ISrrian Ferreira, 20
years "Id, who gave her address as the
Hotel Pennsylvania. They are said to
have been In this country but a few
days.
; The cocaine, according to the detec
tives, was In seventy-live bottles and
two cans. A paekage of powder, al
I leged to be opium, was also found.
| Charges of having narcotics in their
| possession were entered against both
defendants.
The Medical Society of the County of
New York In a statement yesterday
gave its indorsement to the Pearson
Smith bill Is desirable State legisla
tion. The society maintains that the
bill offers the most practicable way of
getting rid "of the intolerable conditions
imposed upon the legitimate practice of
medicine under tho Whitney law." The
Pearson-Smith bill and two others deal
ing with narcotics are to be discussed at
a hearing to-morrow before the Public
Health Committees of the Senate and the
Assembly,
SKKK SITE FOR CXllI HO I MR,
A clubhouse Is contemplated for the
f'irand Street Boys' Association and ne
Votlatlnns are tinder way for the pur
chase of property In West Fifty-seventh
street. Magistrate Max 3. Levlne, pres
ident of the association. Is chairman of
the committee. He said several build
ings are under consideration. There are
2,0ft0 member* of the a?soelatlon. and
some difficulty has been met finding
quarters largo enough. The association
has been meeting in tho Hotel Pennsyl
vania.
HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS.
RrcHorfAall
Broadway, 85th to 86th 3t.
NKW TORK
fiiiltw sr Mm Ion at M!1h Ktreat Cor.
nnMi.1 Station -Two llloek* -Sflfh -<t
Lmtti an,l A/.wl AUracUcn U MH,
Lonrenlent ir, All Shop* >in.<
Thtairtt.
E*cef>tion?lly Urge, quiet room* with
bath and ?p?c ioui c!o*ett. giving all the
comforts and advantage* of Vi j best N. Y.
ritv f otels at reasonable rate*.
It KMT A ( HANI Of." Itl(.llt:sr *T*NI?.
AKI? AT ATTHAt; I IVi; I'lllOM,
rTHE CAMBRIDGE
00 WKST ?*TH ?T.
VKW AfAltTMKVT MOT*?,.
I'M't li'.hllBII MTTRH O.N I K VnK
? NOOM* A I* %TH, *1.100 I I*.
:< ItOtlMs fi It \ | II. V'f .VIO I l\
IIKSTU'ltl^T X I A ? Aim;
I t/iid r can,- manttvi it . Lan^duti
K. II l IIAT1I.I.UV.
SPANISH LEADS IN
LANGUAGE STUDY
German Drops Almost Out of
Sight in City's High
Schools.
FRENCH Ml ST EH 30,000
"ew Italian Scholars, but More
Loam Latin for Collie
Purposes.
Figures which have just been made
up by the foreign language department
of the Hoard of Education show that
the study of German. once In high favor
among the city's high school pupils, has
declined within the hwt four years 'o
such an extci.t that only 886 pupils are
Biving it any attention now, aa againtii
29,774 who were studying It In 1916. !
Of' the S86 boys and girls who are 1
studying it to-day all are pupils In the I
senior high schools, for In the Junior I
high schools, although hetwen 16,000 and :
17,000 pupils are students of language, j
not a single one lias elected to take a !
course in German. The study of Span- ]
ish, on the other hand, has become enor- I
mously popular with high sciiool stu- I
dents. Nearly 40,000 are studying it.
French is next, with the enrolment will j
above 30,000. i
For a number of years the cities of the !
United Stales contained thousands of j
fathers an 1 mothers wiio looked upon
German as the most desirable language
their children coulil acquire as a supple- j
inent to their own, such was the force of
traditlcn that Germany had a sort of
stranglehold upon 1-nowledge. Then Ger- j
many was driving hard with her com
mercial products at the big and little |
markets of the world and it was irnag- ;
lned that if a lad '.vhen he became a J
merchant jr manuficturer were to hope
to hold his own it would be well for him
to be able to read and write German.
By the time this country went to war
nearly all of the children who had made
up tin? classes In German already had
dropped It. When war was formally de
clared the Board c Education dropped
it, too. It was put bnck in the curricu
lum In the autumn following the armis
tice but with the strong prejudice in
this wintry aeainst everything German
foun I little favor with the scholars. Last
year there were 532 high school pupils
grinding at it, and this year there are
886.
There are 110 teachers of languages
in the Junior schools and 300 in the
senior ones, and these minlfter to;
classes in which the pupils have elected
courses as follows: In the 3enlor
schools 31,334 are studying Spanish.
22.215 French. 14,000 Latin, 886 German
and 240 Italian. In the junior schools
French predominates with 8,743 stu
dents. 6,000 are studying Spanish, 2,000 j
Latin and 246 Italian. These figures^
take In girl students as well as boys j
and include all the high schools in the :
live boroughs. No one concerned with j
the teaching of languages in the city's
schools seems to know by what means j
the knowledge that Spanish is a useful j
tongue to know found the circulation that;
It has among New York school children, j
Since practically all the children who
were . studying German before the war
have graduated from high school, those!
who dropped It when the war arrived ar>;,
not studying Spanish now. And yet fig
ures on flic show that the proportion of
those who studied German and Spanish j
before the war are about the same as
those who are studying it after, except
that, the numbers have been reversed.
Most'y the pupils who are studying i
Spanish are in the commercial classes of I
the high schools, and they expect It to ,
be oi use to them, as trade with the!
Latin-* merlcan countries shall ha\-e de-j
veloped by the time they are in business
positions.' French is favored about aa 1
much now as it ever was, which has al- t
ways been a good deal, and Is chosen
mostly by the pupils who expect to go on :
fiom high school to college.
About the only ones who are studying :
German are students who expect to fol- ?
low scientific careers aid a few who are j
pronouncedly of German blood and tradi- j
lion. There are a few more studying
Italla.i now than formerly, but. they, too. :
have taken It up mostly for reasons of j
race and tradition and not because they ^
are able to see a-iy c.ioney in it
KESOKTS.
Atlantic City.
of Disiir\cti(m. wvd ftpalConvfcrt
> rinintoor oaraok.
capacity ?m?o IVa/rrr././Jsmfy
ROYAL PALACE
HOTELcCOTTAGES
o rx tKc BeAcK.. C\a600
CONVENIENT TO ALL AMUSEMENTS
SeiiB&tks-DIET KITCHEN Orchwba
Family Patron&qe Irvvitcd
C.L.Hanstein "Man J.Wat rosjs
Pr>pi<iont Sect.ftHdr.
HOTEL
CHELSEA I
Oct'upjlni rntir* hlork of ocran front la'
the fashionable Chetoes ??<?<(ion.
niMI h''?I rliambrr- with prl\:l(<> batll*
<frr?li and Mfit wntT). High das* arthm
tm, rnfr. grill. *0. Frrnrh rhrf*. tlolf
prlvllrgn Antoa mi?l tr?in?. Braiklft.
Ojwn all Tear. 3. n. THOMPSON A CO.
, HACK LAT2 CO,
HOTEL BOTH WELL
Virginia avo., aCCond hotlM frnm iloardualk
and Pt el I'ter. K?< ijr appointment.
ttandard in culslnu and ??rvl'->'. Booklet.
J BOTHW8U*
akctrond. N. 4.
Laurel-in the Pines
LAKE WOOD.N.J.
! SITUATEI AM0N8 THE PINES AN!
! OVERLOOKING LAKE CARASALJO
New "Palm Grill"?18 hole Golf
I 0>ur?e,Horiiel>iick Hiding.Molorinu,
j Pirturr?f|iie WaMcc. Mn?lc, Private
i Garage. N?w Klei'tr?-hy<lr(>lhera)>jr
' liatli SviKB.
i
U.S. FUTURE BRIGHT
FOR OCEAN TRADE
R. C. Mitchell Brings Optimis
tic Reports After Survey
of Europe.
GERMANS TO THE FORE
Better off Than Many Other
Countries, With 200 !? reiglit
ers on the Ways.
Kosooe C. Mitchell, viho lias been
making an extended survey of shipping
conditions in Europe for Admiral Ben
son heed of the United States Shipping
Roard. returned yesterday by the United
States mail liner Panhandle State with
comments on the present ^agnation of
wan traffic everywhere. He noted that
Germany seemed to be better off than
many othe.r Euiopean countries. SjK
has -00 ship?, mostly freighters, on the
ways, and Is earnestly preparing to enter
the world trade.
Mr. Mitchell .-aid there was no cause
for gloom on the part of those Interested
in the American merchant marine, as
should be remembered that England has
more than 2,000.000 tons of Idle shipping.
The freight rates were so low, he said,
that If the ships were operated would
be at a loss. The allocation of -00 C,er
mnn ships to the British Government
had not helped the situation. They had
been offered at a very low price, and this
had helped to drive the price of new
tonnage down to nine pounds a ton
against a former price, two years ago, of
thlrty-flve pounds a ton. This resulted
in cancellation of building contracts by
shipowners.
Mr. Mitchell noted that the United
States seemed to be able to sell coal in
England now. because of the fall In
ocean freight rates, cheaper than coal
from the Birtish mines. There was a
movement to reduce the miners wages
Ave shillings a day, which would more
than wipe out the raise they had le
ceived not so long ago. France was no
longer a buyer of British coal, as she
was receiving an allotment 'of German
coal under the terms of the Versailles j
treaty. The future of American ship
ping and America's place on the seas
was more talked about in England than !
the Irish question. Every Liriton appar- j
entlv had heard that the Stars and !
Stripes, seldom seen In foreign waters,j
was now flying In evory port in the j
world.
Prof. Robert T. Lelper of the London
School of Troploal Medicine, who also
arrived by the Panhandle State, is on his
way to the British West lndlee to study
the diseases peculiar to thoso Islands as
a member of a commission of six emi
nent English surgeons and physicians,
who will make their headquarters at:
Trinidad. Dr. Lelper said he was espe- I
dally interested In a disease, prevalent1
in the tropics, that Is transmitted to j
humans through the fresh water snail, <
The snail Infects the water and the dis- |
ease may be taken through the sUi:i by j
bathers in the Infected water.
K. OF C. FORMS HOYS' CLUB.
The boys' club movement which the j
Knights of Columbus have been spon- j
coring in the middle West has reached j
this city. A club, designed along the j
plan of a community service centre for !
(uvenlles, is now being formed at Corrl- j
ijan Council, K. of C., on W ashington j
Heights. The formation of other clubs
was assured at a meeting of the New
York chapter of the order at the Hotel
Commodore yesterday.
ART SALES.
NOW ON EXHIBITION IN
/fa pSiLcys
Galleries
fifiSlr40 E'45th St'
Vnnderbilt Ave.
James P. Kilo &. Son, Auctioneers.
The Chait Collection
OF
Chinese Porcelains
Mr. K. Chitt U recognised tut one
of the* foremoftt aulhorltlo* on
ChlnMo I'ori-elitn* in the V nliefl
Jilnlr*. Tht* ?:ile N forciM upon
liflm by the difficulty of ilfNpo*lvig
of Important dIpwji through the
regular channel* In the*e times.
AT UNRESTRICTED
PUBLIC AUCTION
On the Afternoon of
SATURDAY, MARCH 12TH,
AT St30 r. M.
We Will Continue Our Regular
Estate Sales of
Antique and Modern
Furniture, Oriental
Rugs, China, etc.
ON THURSDAY & FRIDAY,
March 10 and II, at 2 P. M.
Together with an interesting Col*
lection of Mezzotint Engravings.
Catalosum mailed en request.
SALES AT AUCTION.
ANTIQUE AND MODERN~
PAINTINGS
100 Pictures in All.
THOS. F. BURCH1LL,
AKTIOMtXR,
HEUJt THIS DAY, 10:30 A. M? AT
The Chelsea Fireproof
STORAGE WAREHOUSES, Inc.
434-436 West 26th Street.
A very Unto collection nf painting., ant.
plcturM by prominent American and Foreign
Artists. Landscape*, Moonlight, Marines, I
Still Ufa, TMMtrlv*, Futurists and many I
other fine old specimen*.
ONE LARGE PAINTING, SIZE ABOUT 15*2!),
"WASHINGTON LANDING
AT THE BATTERY."
Artists and Title# of some of ttie picture*
M. Holden. ?'Woodland"; J. M. K, "Cows" ; I
H. Cnrr, "Oplv* and Boy"; K. f.lgnoux] I
N. A.. "Hounds"; I*. Cnrr. "Children on
BeaHi"; Holti .T. Pattlson, "ms? Country
8>:?no" and other.:. ' aponl, Jr.. ?'liiiiiei
Homeitead"; J. Holland Pmltli, "Hliepard
ess"; I'lngln J. I,., "Floueis, UW.V
Anefs Office. II" \\. :i'?li. Tel. lit/ Itry .VV).
AMUSEMENTS.
CARNR'itF. MALT., HAT . MARCH 12, ,? a 3f>'
MME. and MISS LOUISE
HOMER
ftXHTHKH IN RBC1TAU (Rteinu-uy Piano.) I
CARBN01E3 HAfJj, TO-NIOKT AT R;l#.
I,a?t HcHal foi 2 8<a?0tt??MISCHA
LEVITZKI
'r!<t?.?'Oo*0;f. Mrt Dm ! iMa) or. i'mciim: ,?
AMUSEE^TrS.
AMUSEMENTS.
AMERICA'S FOREMOST 'BATHES AND HIT?, DIRECTION OF L
CEKTUHY PROMENADE "ABOVE CFNTUR7 THEA
ftlONIOHT ROUNDERS
*.|li ??(><> <mk tO::?Of* >i l*i " " . ?i t:.
The WINTER GARDEN'S
Greatest Laughing Hit!
?PASSING SHOWwi
ProsontinnWillie & Eugene Howard
marie dressler-h vrryw vtson
Evenings 8:1ft. Matinee To-m w 215.
Evs. 8:30. Mats. Wed. & Sat. t-fj, ? lS
flmhawOov-lr^
THE ROSE GIRL wl^c^s
and LYD1A LOPOKOVA In a new Ballet
by M. KOKINK
W>w VOR ICS PRETTIEST CIIORUS.
fNOLOROOK QLIMN
AS A LQvA&K lA0i"*6 f SAA&T
THE BAO MAN
- COMEDY MArl?MUAi UAT
cms:]?!
Eve. 8:30
Mts.Wid.Sat.
r BlUi. EYES
PLAYHOUSE1 r'vivy
L\ Evs 8:l5.Mats.Wed.& Sat..
z* KEANE
IN ROMANCE
Hr'uyV 48th ???,"ZViT35
Th'BROKIHWIM
Sl'.l'. FIIK ('HaM(tI:s*? ,Vt.i.t>J'i..A.v i..
Rl IfS j W1 4Sth St. Evs.
uijyw Matinees \y,vi. & flat. 2MO.
JOHN GALSWORTHY'S
GREATEST PLAY
THE SKIN GAME
CENTRAL B"
rth&B'y. K vs.8:30.
Mau. Wed. & Sat.. 2:30.
Last 4 Weeks. i'op. Mat. We i. 50o to $2.
F. Kay Oomstock /k Morris Hart Present
The London and Paris Sensation
\ ill Th? Mimical Hhow
DELYSIA "AFGAR"
"Hfm tokon Vcnv Vorlv by storm."Telegram
WILLIAM AliCHER?"Afiss Lulu Belt'
is a new and delightful variety of the rlassiar!
Cinderella type.
|REPlTRLIO|Uv.8:30. MM.Wad.*S t. 2:30.
1 Went 42d S? JOHN* GOLDEN I'ih-mviUs
Dear Me
bijou
THE TRYANNY Of LOVE
A sotumlonal drama from the French, with
Estello Wlnwood, Cyril Height ley,
Goorjres Flateau. Margaret Dele.
MATINEES WED. ft SAT., 2:30.
SHUBERT THRATRP1. ?th St., W. Of Broadway. Evening* 8:20.
onuDiilvi 1 Matinees Wednesday and Saturday 2:20.
DON'T FORGET, FOLKS!
TO-NIf.HT 1 am back "Rain ,n tlle olJ strect- but
1 don't net mixed nnd ?o to the Nora Bivyf'^
Theatre Instead nf to the SHl'BERT. / hare a programme
if nanus to si no to you, all better, livelier and wore
?atrhu their, any you havi sHit// or tc/iisfJed before. Also
s*c-w Scenes, New Dances, New Costumes. mil more Pep In
"HERFAMILY TREE"
STAGED BY HASSARD SHORT.
BELMONT M?T?,48
W 46th .-it. Eves. 8 -.10.
Mfts. Wea., Thurs. A. Sat
MISS LULU BETT v^i;u^im^Tn,or.
GOOI) SEATS FOR BROCK TEMHKRTON'S BCCCE88B8 AT BOX OFFICES.
FULTON
"CENTER
FRA7FP W. 42d St. Eves. 8:30.IPhone 31 I APOLLO
1 KAtLL Muts. \V,>1. ft Sat. 2:30 Bryant. I nTVUJJ
'THE WOMAN
MARGARET
Thea
Mats
OF BRONZE"
U'v & 45th St. Evs. 8:25.
I',.ti.) it Sat, 2:2.).
ASTOR
kiew^wwit
Drama Hit
?EVENINGS (Except Sat.)
ISATCRD \V MATINEE
WEDNESDAY
BEST
Ma'tYnee SKATS
$2,501
1.'.til i|
1.501
IQfVi 9T THEA. nr. IVy. Evs.H 30.(1.AST 2
JVtn O 1 . Mats. Wed & Sat 2 SO. |WEEKS
T5 TT TVT A "l\T 7 "Samson Sc Dellla.li"
?> XL, IN-f\ iVi 1 with I'auliiiH Lord.
PRINCESS Kv": ?:45'
& Sat. at 2 :H0.
KGasniams
_ "llh ('HA'tl'ES < 1 ll.l'l N.
SPECIAL MATINEES at the PRINCESS.
TO-DAY, TO-MORROW, THURS. ft FRI.
DI FF' RENT Sex-Starved Woman
West 42<I St. Eves. 8:30.
Mats. Wed. ft Hat. 2:30.
LIONEL BARRYMORE
"MACBETH."
JULIA ARTHUR
CHARLES I)AHA aiHSOX?"A/to Lulu
Belt" picks jewels from the common, everyday
soil we all fnou:
BOOTH
1.11 h. W. of If way. Eves. 8:30.
Mat I noes Wod. & Sat. 2:30.
GEORGE
Arliss
THE GREEN
IN GODDESS
Ry WM. ARCHER.
T V T? T r 43d. St. W. of B'way.
^-* Twice Daily 2:15 A 8:15.
Metro Pictures Corporation Presents
The FOUR
HORSEMEN
of the APOCALYPSE
00 to 50c. Dally Matinees St.50 to 5<
Ev
BROADHL'RST^ViX:.ffi^b.
William
Fox
Presents
By Will Carleton
OVER THE HILL
Directed t>y H. Mlllarde.
TICKETS
FOR ALL THEATRES
50c ADVANCE
The
Original
TYSON <
ESTABLISH
1
NEW YORK'S liEADINO THEATRES AND SUCCESSES
FMPTRF B'way ft 40 St. at 8:15
E.1VU mr. Mats W(.(1 awl S;U 2.1 -?
RUTH "Strhi*
CHATTERTON s,m. 1 ROSE
RFT Asro w'v,t nth St. Em at 8 is.
M lM Thurs. an,| Sit... 2:1 V
in OuItry-Barker*
"DEBURAU"
I YfFl IM T!i??a., W. 45th St. Ev*. K:2<>.
L1V.C.VJ1VI Mats Thur, |inl, Sat-i -:?>?
New Amsterdam at 8:16. Mats. Wed. ft Sat.
mary ZIEGFELD ppqouctqn
Lionel Atwill
mas1lym MILLER
LEON ERROL
2 Oo? CtfVices Open
Until 9 30 PM '
, ' THE GOLD
ln DIGGERS uopw cxxl
I NEW AMSTERDAM KOOF?t?ft II. NEW
! ZIEGFELD
SnuNUiilr*PKOLic8
1 Dinner ni 7?Dancing?Supper at. 11
THE TAVERN THE TAVERN
throw i p YOUR HANDS, SHERIFF!
MAV v I sT IHth HT. K\ > -
WH t M"is. Wcl Mid Sat.. 2:20.
Laur&ttelaylor
? PEG OMY HEART] I"?
W J KARtLEV MA.Ms!t PT, I nAH
WHAT MORE COULD HAPPEN.'
Tilly fOIKRIFF'K A Til 1KF7
LIBFRTY West, 42 Street. Eves. at 8:15
1 I ,,op Mnls w & s-2:20.
SAM H. HARRIS
SUCCESSES
HENRY MILLER'S
Eva. 8:20. Mttlnec* Thi.rs. ft Sat 2:20.
mdc r|CMT'u"WAKEUP
IVIKO. I i vfi ? JONATHAN 1"
KLAW THEATRE^i^s:
Matinees Wednesday ft Satunlay at 2:20.
FRANCINE LARR1M0RE
In RACHEL
C BOTHERS'
New Plajt,
'NICE PEOPLE'
SAM H HARRIS'?^
HATS WfcD n SAT g 5Q-BRYANT e?H
amnmha
In the mudcal comedy hit. "Lady Hilly"
BEST SEATS WED. MAT. $2
GEO.
COHAN'S^ BIG HITS
HUDSON TSZgffTt-l*
THE H|ANEST MAN
IN THE WORLD
vrthOTTO KPUGEB arm MAftiQN COAKLE.Y
ceo
AV
THE TAVERN
HHATSALL THE SHOOTING FOR?
knkkerbocktr"^^.^?!?,
GEO M. COHAN S COMEDIANS I
Ci \lETY. R'v ft H> St Mis. \\.i I rl. ft A
JOHN (rOLI)EN present*
The TAVERN
Htve nuTfiy, for thw sakn of o"r *'hlld.
GLOBE. Kv?.8:30. Mats. Wed. Ac Sat . 2:30.
y& (RED STONE "tip-top" i
THE TAVERN
Ve Hod*? Did He gw Think of the Wife
A PLAYLETS M!
Hy CLARE KUMMER.
"Sparkleii from beginning to end."World
TO-DAY, 2:30
PUNCH & JUDY ??
ROLAND YOUNQ
in ROLLO'S WILD OAT
EVERY EVE. ft FRI. A ?AT. MATS.
THE TOWN HALL, SUN. AFT., MA It. 13.
Jult* Dalber announce* Concert of Pin no Com
position* by eminent Composer-I'laniit EIINO
DOHNANY1
,Veie find ftitrrfntirtn Program.
CHICK ERIN* i FIANO-AMPICO RECORDS.
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
LEOPOLD STOKOWBKI, Conductor. I
CARNEOIETO-MoRROW UADfU O nt
HALL |EVENINO IVIAtV. |"| 0? Kl
BRAHMS' "REtjCIEM." H1NKLE. Soprano; j
WBRRBNRATH, Itarltone. PHILADELPHIA
ORCHESTRA CHORUS.
Aeolian Hall, Thii Sal. Aft. at 3. March 12 |
Laat Pianoforte Km Ital Thl* Season by Harold
BAUER
S^at* Now at Bt>* Off TV to$2. Mafton&Hamllib
Management Metropolitan MuMral Hitreati.
APOLLO TIIEA., Sun. Eve., Mftr. 18, at U:.lO
I,a*t Appearance this Season of
RUTH DRAPER
IN OtMOINAL CHARACTER SKETCHES.
Ticket* $""<? to 11. Met. J R. POND,
AEOLIAN HALL. THIS AFTERNOON AT 3 I
MURRAY? DAVEY
RECITAL. Ota -..n *? ltanilhi Pinno.l I
TOWN HALL, W. C.1 St., To-nlfjlit at * I.", I
MEADER
o\(i rei'ITAL. (Bielnwaj i'laic-.j
Philharmonic
STRANSKY Conductliift
Carnegie Hall, Thur. Ev., Mar. 10. at 8.50
"PATHETIQUE"
Friday Afternoon, March II, at 2 "0
HEKTMUVEN PRiHiRAMME
ALEXANDER SCHMULLER
Violin KololMt
^ttn4fty Afternoon, March 13, nt 3
JOSEPJ-1 sSCHWARZ
nfr<flAn Itarttone
FRMX F. LEIFBTiH. \tftnnurp. ?
MENGELBERG
CONCERTS.
National Symphony Orchestra
CARNKOIK THIS i MONDAY) AFT., 2:110
HALL Wed K\ 'nine. March 8 r.
('orkLLI, Concerto i!ro?*p; SCIIOEN
BBIU>. "Vt:kl :< rtc Nachf'i WAGNER,
"Lohen*rln" Prelude; R. STRAUSS,
"Salome'* Dance" nml "Don .luan."
m'N. EVE., MAR 13.. TUBS AFT . MAR 15
Nnlni.it RACHMANINOFF 1'tnnint
P0PV1.AR PKH'KH, "I S. liI B,. 2."h TO 12
THE KNARE IS THE OFFICIAL PIANO.
AEOLIAN HALL
TO-NIGHT AT 8:15 P. M.
NEW YORK TRJ.0
laiencc Adler, Piano: S'lplone
Violin: Coriiellu* *'an VII t, i
lCr.A'1 ' Mo;.ni*t, Wolf Ftnarl.
i .uldl,
| AMUSEMENTS.
BE AND J. J. SHUBERT.
CENTL'RYTHEATRE ^13
1C VS. & M.VI .MAT. MX- to $2.50. I'Ol*.
?ALLS'! .VI* ('at in r.'epS'Trtarle MAT.
IN THE NIGHT WATCH I,?
Matinees Wednesday ?t Saturday, 2:30.
Nora THFA Ht- w- of
V Bayoa 1 nc-A. B y. Eva. 8:30.
<C)l!?i GHOSTS
"A Screvnin* Oomwty."?Teh.
a? TWEN'TV-KOrilTII WEEK.
SAM H. HARRIS'
Successes
pi VMfll !TH4 "'th St. ,W. of Broadway
rL. I 1VIUU I nMats Thura. & Sat. 2:20.
LITTLE 0L0 NEW YORK
I nNHAPRF W.48 at! Bryant 23. Kvs.8:30
LunuAbnc Mati Wed & Sill 2 a0
GRANT MITCHELL
in "THE CHAMPION"
The TUSATBB GUILD Presents
MB. P I M PASSKS BY
fARRIPkf ?5 W. 36th. Fltrroy 1523.
U/iK _ K% s. K ;30. Alts. Thurs. & Sat.
44TH ST. THEATRE ^??,ay.
JCrrninas 8:15. Matinees i:Ur>.
I) W. GUIFFITK I"rcser.ts
"WAY DOWN EAST"
Symphony Orchestra. All Smts Reserv 1
PF.r.GY WOOD?"Miss Lulu Belt" aare
me the most enjoyable afternoon I hare )u:.d
in months.
FT T1 NT.F WeKt 4-<l Eves. 8:45.
1 1 IN u ^ Mats. Wed. Ac Sat. 2 30.
LADIES NIGHT
EIVTINOE THKA.?HI'KOIAL MATINEES
To-day, Tues. Thurs, Fri. 2:15
"The White Villa"
iMAXINEELLIOTTTlJi
) Eves, at 8:30. Mats. Wod. A Sat. at 2:30. \
INTERNATIONAL SUCCESS! '
31st WEEK UNP^UsfN^SSTED ]
SPANISH LOVE'
EXTRA MAT. ST. 1'ATIUOK'S DAY. \
tggm&BtR
Nv83oM?uwhl?Sita?J/lw WEe w
k CO. 1472 B'WAY. 4080 Bryant
?D 1859 100 B'WAY. >100 Re ;tor
METROPOLITAN gSusc
TO-NIGHT, 8, ANDRE CHENIER. Muzlo,
Perlnl; GlRll, Danlao, Dldur?Moran/.onl.
WED.. 8, SECRET OF SUZANNE. Borl;
Scottl?Papl. (First tlmol THE POLISH JEW
("The Bells"). Delaunola, Howard; Cham
lee. Caupolli an. Lwnhnnil?Hedansky.
I THURS. MAT., $1 to f-t. AIDA. Musslo. J*z-t
]zarl, Crlml, Zanelle, Mardonea?Moranzont.
THURiTSTi ,"n 03 J ion IRD. SM ton, Del a U -
riots. Ellin, Berat; Rothler. Chalmers?Wolff.
FBI. at 8, CARMEN. Farrar, Borl, Galli;
Harrnld, Whltehlll, Annnlan?Wolff.
SAT. at 2. RIGOLETTO. Chase, Pertnl;
Haekott, De Lura. Rothler?Moranzonl.
SAT.. N. Pop I'rtrca, DON CARLOS. Pernlta.
Gordon, Clfillt; Crlml, Danlse, IJldur?Papl.
NEXT MOX. at 8, Double Bill, L'ORACOLO.
IJori: Ilnrrolil, Srottl, Dldur?Moranznnl. l'ol
!r.\v??l by POLISH JEW ("The Balls"). De
launola, Howard; Chamlce, Caupollean, Leon
hardt?Bodanzky.
HARDMAN piano used.
MANHA T T aTn Souse
PALVOWA
THE INCOMPARABLE
anp ballet russe
opening THURSDAY NIGHT
SEASONS FAREWELL 12 PERFORMANCES
Ending Suturduy, March 11).
Matinees: SAT., WED. and PAT,
All Performances SI to I'l
Kxeept Sat. Nlghta, $1 to $3.-V).
MamiKement FORTUNE GALLO.
n?TH STREET THEATRE
THURSDAY AFT.. MARCH 10th, at 2: r.O
A RECITAL OF
YVETTE
GUILBERT
FRENCH SONG.'-1. OLD AND NEW
CI IANSONS
DU CI EL ET DE LA TERRE.
Tickets at Box Office.
Mm. Hcl^n Love, 1 W. 34th. Knabe Piano.
PARAMOUNT PICTURES
I V 0 L I "The Gilded Lily"
B'wny MAE MURRAY.
at 40th"tK. RlvoU Concert Orch,
| A i"X A t'<tMKDY WEEK.
1 n I. I Vy Douglas MacLean
TIMES' In "Chicken*," Chaplin Revival.
SQUARE FAMOUS III ALTO OTUJI).
"Buried Treasnfe"
with Marion Davie?
R
R
CRITERION
B'way at 44 t-'t.
.CAPITOL wm
World'aLargest .Mosill. uutlfulTliea
"LYING LIPS"
CAPITOL GRAND ORCHESTRA.
Matinees ,10c-50c. Nights fl6c-85o.
Loew's New York Theatre 6t Roof
Cont. 11 A. M. to 11 I*. M. Roof to 1 A. ?!.
CHARLIE CHAPLIN In "THE KID."
Loew'sAmerican *??*? ??t.w.of bj^
Charlie Chaplin In "The Kid," | All S??t?
AI MM Troupe, Newsboy Sex
I u tie. jimmy lt??en & Co., otha. I Keaerved
gaiwpgB
NIPPODDOMC
Cv*t 8.IO ? IOOO PfOWJ -100 HOVllTltS
P
n. F Kelth'a | Ous Edwarda and Hla An
Al a r* tr mini Song nevue, Natl
L, ? ^ E, nuK'iinltn. Sylvia Clark.
Bryant 4.10<>. | Brnnson * Baldwin, othara
- Dally 2Bc?fl.| and ' ha*. (Chlc> Pale.
RRAMHALL ns R**' armt st. e*?. b:ib.
irl u Poll. Mat. Wed. fiOc to tl.Mk
"THE TIE THAT LIBERATES."
COLUMBIA "'?">? Tu lee Dally [Popi'.lai
POWDER PUFF REVUE.
t\!th Jnml* Coughlln nml Jack Pfart
StranD'^,^
:: ? a A ITtti - nt \M > imm hestr \.
BROOKLYN AMUSEMENTS.
flTAP A J.i- i en- I'ulto i Htroet
J I /\rv [IH||, Tel Trtanfflt 481?r
lJP"r: THE BIG SENSATION
?H'M

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