OCR Interpretation


The New York herald. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, March 07, 1921, Image 8

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045774/1921-03-07/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 7

GIBBS SAYS PRIEST
WHO BACKS SINN
FEIN IS DISLOYAL
} ?
Stokes Fires of Hate, In-j
cites to Physical Conflict,
Charges Lecturer.
REPLY" TO FR. DUFFY!
Irish Pamphlets Viewed as!
Urging War Between U.S. i
and Britain.
CHAPLAIN DEPLORES WAHl
Asserts in Another Meeting,
That Money Will He Cause,
if It Ever Conies.
Sir Plilllp Olbbs closed a lecture on I
the Irlah situation last night with the ]
unequivocal charge that Catholic priests
In American who ara supporting the Sinn !
Fein direct actioniats are unfaithful to
the ideals of their vocation, "stoking up
the bad fires of hate and doing no ser- :
vice to humanity." Sir Philip, with po
licemen spread ail about, spoke in th.' '
Casino Theatre and lovelled his chal
lenge at the Rev. Francis P. Duffy,
chaplain of the ltJ5th infantry, who ad- '
dressed 1,500 persons In the Selwyn
Theatre In answer to Sir Philip's lecture
of February 25.
"I can't understand these Catholic
priests, how they can reconcile their
faith, believe in their Master's word,
and at the same time Incite to physical
conflict," Sir Philip ^ild. "J have read
articles and pamphlets prepared by Sinn
Fein as a direct incitement to war be
tween the United States and Kngland.
If there ever Is a war?which there
never will be?between these two races,
that will be the end of civilization, and !
the end of Christianity, to whose ser- \
\ fee Father Duffy and his colleagues
have dedicated themse'ves."
Sir Philip's introductory words at a;
meeting that went along smoothly for a
time and then was punctuated with fre
quent interruptions of Irish sympathiz
ers, were prophetic. He declared there
was a duel or in New York between
himself and Father Duffy, "and the but
tons are off our foils."
Irlnli Mrrtlnit Orderly.
While Sir Philip was directing his
words against what he considered the
dangerot s action of Catholic priests and
Irish Americans in support of the Sinn
Fein cause. Father Duffy spoke t > one
of the most orderly Irish meeting". In
the opinion of observers, in the history :
of New York.
"Father Duffy and his colleagues do
not see the danger ?f what they are do
ing," Sir Philip said, giving his words
an earnestness that varied from the1
cool delfberattness of his discussion otj
Irish history earlier in the evening.
' They don't see that they are playing,
with hell Are."
In the Selwyn Theatre these were
Father Duffy's words in regard to a I
possible war between England and
America over the Irish question: "I;
don't want war with England. I often
feel that those who want war never saw j
Its horrors. If ever we have armed
conflict with the British it will be over ?
the question of money?It will be a,
ghastly war. Anybody who deliberately (
!ets loose these woes on the world thould
be condemned to a hell more terrible;
than Milton or Dante ever dreamed of."
Sir Philip began his discussion of the |
attitude of he Irish Americans by de- |
scribing Father Duffy as a "great g< n-;
tlemun and a fine sportsman." At the '
Csrntifle Hall meeting of February 26
Father Duffy helped quell disorder when 1
Irish sympathizers refused to let. Sir
Philip <>roceed. Father Duffy on that I
occasion announced that he did not agree I
with the conclusions of the speaker on ,
the Irish question.
After paying his compliment. Sir,
Philip said: "A few words about Father i
Duffy, lie is on the side of evil and |
not of good."
Thrrnt From llnlcunjr.
In the second row of the balcony a
man arose and shouted: "Look out!
The Sixty-ninth (referring to the New
York regiment) will get you to-morrow."
Sir Thlllp paused a moment and then ,
proceeded, his criticism of the Irish
Americans and Catholic priests closing
an addres.s marked by the .seeming
sympathy of the audience, and by here ;
and there frequent objections of a small
knot of persons In the front of the bal
cony.
Capt. Harry Howard of the West Thir
tieth street precinct and about forty
policemen were posted in the theatre.
They guarded the aisles, were In the
hoxeti.- the foyer and back of the stage.
As fast as interruptions were shouted at |
Sir riilllp a cop hurried to the side of
the heckler, pointed a long night stick ,
and got order. No one whs ejected and
there was no trouble beyond the Inter- i
ruptlonn.
Father Duffy said the dictates of I
Justice demand that the British Gov
ernment remove its army forces from
Ireland and let tHo Irish people set up |
the Government they wish. The Eng
lish conquest of Ireland began in 1170 |
A. D, he said, and has not ended yet. 1
The priest referred to the Irish ques- j
tlon ns "tho one unsettled question In !
the troubled history of the world."
"This Irish question Is not merely a
domestic question for the British Isles
to settle," Father Duffy continued. "It
Is, and always has been, a world ques
tion. The British say that they cannot
let Ireland go, as that would be setting
up a danger on their flank. Ireland Is ,
now. and always has been, a danger on
the flank. The great war begun when
the Germans felt suro there was going |
to be a rebellion and mutiny in the j
north of Ireland. The French Directory
and Napoleon both tried to hit England
through Ireland. The Spaniards and
the Scotch ulso tried to make n?e of
Irish grievances to conduct their attack
on England.
*rmpnthr .Not for War.
"Yes, and the time will come when 8
discontented Ireland will be a breeding
plft'o of trouble between Ore at Britain
and the United States. Ireland now has
few friends in this country among those
who niuke peace or war. And, more
over. her sympathies are not trying for
war. AH tho solemn people of this i
country ure sore on Ireland now. The 1
solemn statesman, the solemn professor,
the I olemn editor, tho solemn clergy- j
num?all have a grievance against Ire
land because they have been shown u*r '
The Irish persist In taking at face value j
all the solemn stuff that did service I
while the war was on about the rights |
of small nations and human liberties !
and self-determination and all the rest |
of It. The Irish have called the world's 1
) lutT and have proved that they did not
tiMnn It.
"But If lh*re came a clash of gr?iat
/ ??? . N
Prisoners' Psychology
to Undergo Color Test
'pHE four cell blocks of the
East View Penitentiary, in
Westchester county, are being
repainted, and Warden Warren
McClellan announced yesterday
that he was trying to see the
effect that color has on crim
inals. He is permitting each
prisoner to select the color for
the walls of his cell. The prison
ers will be watched to see if the
selections have any psychological
effect. The officials, huwever,
have lixed the color for the cor
ridors. It will be light brown.
V J
political or economic interests between
the two countries some strings would
be pulled and our big mi''neles which
control public opinion would bejin to
harp on British denial of liberty in
Ireland and Hrltish atrocities in Ireland
in exactly the same way that the Urttish
writers use Poland a8 a means to hit the
Czar. and Itelgium in our times as a
means of provoking resentment against
Germany.
"Now the greatest harm that Sir
Philip Glbbs can do the Irls'.i cause Is
to persuade the American public that
his liberalism represents the English at
titude toward Ireland. Actually. .Sir
Philip has nothing that he can promise
the Irish.
Lloyd Ueornre the Man.
"The Irish know perfectly well with
whom they have to deal in this matter,
and he is neither king nor baronet,
but a mighty tougn little commoner, Mr.
David Lloyd George. Read the papers
day by day and you will find no indica
tion on the Government side in England
1 to nwltt any change in the Irish policies
?'not even a trui. with the fighting
rebels," says the Premier, and Green
wood is to stick on his Job and carry
i out hi3 policy of schreckiichkelt."
Father Duffy said that Premier Lloyd
George Is fond <jt' talking to get. the
American ear. "He has put himself in
the position of Lincoln and ha.a tried to
make the Irish appear to be the oeees
slonists.
"England knows that her government
in Ireland is a failure," the priest added.
"It is the most ghastly of alien govern
ments all over the world. The Jirltlsh
say the Irish cannot govern themselves.
1 say give them a chance. They can't
d" any worse than the English have
done themselves for 750 years. Nearly
all the crime in Ireland that they talk
about has been crime against Hrltlfch
rule."
IRISH PRIMATE MAKES
NEW APPEAL FOR TRUCE
Cardinal Would Have Peace
Return on St. Patrick's Day.
Ry the Asaooiatcd Pirsn.
Belfast, March 6.?Cardinal Xxjguc,
Primate of AH Ireland, in a letter to the
priests of the Armagh diocese makes
another powerful appeal for a truce in
Ireland and suggests the forthcoming
feastday of the first national apostle
offers an opportue occasion for an ap
peal to the Almighty for the return of
peace to Ireland, pointing out that St.
Patrick brought peace to the country. :
Cardinal Logue says:
"What a reproach it would be should
we dim by crime the lustre of this glor- |
ious inheritance. It is no excuse that
crimes even greater and more numerous
have been committed by others, fo"- (
crime does not Justify crime. We shall |
not before the Judgment seat be called
upon to account for the crimes of the
Black and Tans, or the auxiliary cadets,
or the military, who have sacrificed so
many Innocent lives on the most futile
pretence In their wild raids through
the country. We shall not even be
called to account for the blindness, ob
stinacy and partiality of our present
Government.
Deploring the disregard for human
life and property shown by 'both sides, I
which he declares threatens to reduce
the country to a state of desolation and
ruin. Cardinal Logue especially de
nounces the ambushing and attacking
of soldiers and police in crowded thor
oughfares.
"They who commit such acts know
well those armed forces will blaze a v. ay
indiscriminately, killing and wounding !
poor innocent victims, often women,
girls and children engaged In lawful oc
cupations," the Cardinal continued.
"Lawyers. I think, say such acts, en
dangering the general public, Involve
malice against all mankind, Certainly
all mankind should Join In putting an
end to them."
PLANS OUTLINED FOR
IRISH FUND CAMPAIGN
$10,000,000 Sought in U. S.;
$2,000,000 Here for Relief.
Martin Cociboy, chairman of th
Oreater New York committee- of the
American Committee for Relief in Ire- j
land, announced yesterday at a public !
meeting held in the Waldorf-Astoria j
Hotel that a total of $300,000 In pledges
already has been secured In the cam-!
palgn to raise $10,000,000 in the United
States for the suffering women and chll- I
tlren in Ireland. The quota allotted to
New York is $2,000,000. The campaign
will last one week, beginning March 17.
John 1). Kyan, member of the national 1
executive committee of the American !
Committee for Relief In Ireland, was the |
chief speaker. He outlined briefly the J
objects of the national organization. He
said that the organisation was non-po- I
lllleal and non-sectarian. and that every
penny raised in the coming campaign
will be sent to Ireland, where it will be .
distributed among the poor and needy.
Other speakers at the meeting were
C tpt. John Lucey, who will direct the
national drive; Lawrence Oodkln. Dr.
.Tames J. Walsh, Bird S. Coler and Judge j
Alfred J. Talley.
WOMEN IN PULPIT
OF BUFFALO CHURCH
Rev. L. O. Williams Sits in
Pew as They Lead Services.
Sp' tal limpatch to Tils Nsw York Hnui.n.
Bvktalo. March 4.?The Rev, L. O. !
Williams, pastor of the Church of the
Messiah here, has been endeavoring to
get the viewpoint of the women on ques- '
tlons relating to religious service. 1'>- i
day instead of taking his Msual place in
In the pulpit to conduct the morning ser
vice Mr. Williams sat-In the pew as a
layman while several of the women
workers in the church conducted the
services.
"The experiment worked admirably,"
said the preacher at the close of the
srvlcc. "I gained many valuable sug
gestions from the women which will he
useful in the future, I believe that every
minister should sit in the pew once In
n while and let the men and women of
th?- congregation do the preaching., I
believe that all would get a wider view
point."
The temporary women preachers led
the responses, read pa"?age3 from the
Scriptures and attempted sermons on
civic and national topics.
' HOT DEBATE OVER
ANDERSON TO-NIGHT
Former Regimental Associates
to Pass <?n His Presence in
Rhine Meeting.
I A hot fight is forecast for the meeting
to-night in th? Waldorf-Astoria of the
j former officers ami men of the ltfth
| Infantry, which lias been called to dis
|cu*s the appearance last Monday night
at the "Horrors or' the Rhine" meeting
I
J iii Madison Square Garden of Alexander
E. Anderron. formerly a lleutenar.t
ooionei of the regiment. Many of the
members, It was learned yesterday, fee 1
Mr. Anderson was within his rights in
appearing In the Garden meetliig.'while
others assert his having done so has
placed the regiment in a wrong light.
-\tnong those who arc; expected to at
tend are "Big nill" Donovan, formor
| color el, and the Rev. Father Francis P.
Duffy, chaplain of the unit, which for
merly was the "Fighting" Sixty-ninth.
Father Duffy is known to have a M?h
regard for Mr. Anderson, and while the
priest refused to appear in the Garden
meeting because he thought It wrong, he
| has told friends that the former officer
was entirely within his rights in ap
j pea ring. Mr. Anderson had not re
i celved an invitation to to-night's meet
I ing up to last night.
No action will be taken by the Am?r- j
lean Legion on the various post resolu
tions culling for the expulsion of >lr. |
Anderson until March 19, when the ?
Statu executive committee meets. It Is
understood the executive committee tl\?n
will iauue a statement, and it is con
sidered possible that the suggestion that
Gov. Miller remove Major Hylan for
his failure to prevent the Garden meet- I
lng will be taken under consideration I
with a view to having the State branch
Indorse the appeal.
FIIANCE FIXES WHEAT PRICE.
Pajus, March 8.?Tht >rlce of the
11920 wheat crop will be maintained ut
! 100 francs >>?>? nuintal. M. Paisant, Un- |
der Secretary of the Ministry of Flnanee.
announced in an address yesterday. (A I
I quintal Is 220 pounds.)
LIBERIA RULER HERE
FOR 5 MILLION LOAN
President King Hopes to Con
clude Credit Established
in 191U.
Charles D. R. King. President of the
Republic of Liberia and head of a mis
sion that will go to Washington to-day
to conclude negotiations with the Statu
Department In regard to a credit of
$.*>.000,000 eatable he I in the United '
?State? Treasury in 1918, arrived venter- ;
| day from London by the United >>' ties
?Mail steamship Purftiandle S?ate. P:esi
! dent King was accompanied by Gabriel
L. Dennis, secretary or tiu missimi;
Frederick B. it. Johnson of the I-Iberian i
i Supreme Court and Jonn I.. Morris of
the Liberian diplomatic service- The
I f.,the" inemhci n of the mlast >n Is 1'. G.
Wolo. graduate of Harvard, who greeted
hts colle agues at Qpirantlne, where the
President and his party were taken
aboard the Coast Guard cut''-r Manhat
1 tan by representatives of the Depart- '
it ent of State, landed at the Battery and j
escorted to the Waldorf-A-iforia.
At the Waldorf President JCtlis and
his party were provided with a suite on
the tenth floor with a private dining 1
room. They did not mlnKle with the
! other guests, who were unaware that the I
hotel wh:- entertaining African digni
taries.
President King deputized his secrttary
to Mate that the protracted negotiation
regarding the credit of $5,000,0u0 doub
iest. soor. would be brought '<> a sati.
fa ? r> conclusion, as the Government
and people of Liberia, were anxious 'o
put Into immediate operation a pro
gramme for great industrial develop
ments, including harbor imptovements,
motor road construction, industrial
school*, railways and the extension of
? -!???rapf rind telephone facilities
President King spent yesterday aft
noon sifc'htse??g, accompanied by t'..o
Stat. Department representatives. He
appeared in the i* hurl zed regall i of hln
offic-. in iudinu a napoau with ofrd of
paradise plume*. He was here two
ye i.r.s ago Before becoming President
was \ttomey-General and Secretary
of Htat>-.
WIRE NAILS
COATED ?SMOOTH
Let ua quota on your requirements
ROY L. MOVER CORP'N
36 Front St. N Y. Tel. Bow. Grn 6828-9
Frank Kiernan XCo
155 Broadway, IDac tor 1252,
The Cutler-Hammer
Hanufacturintj Co
Eloctric Mote Contra'hng Dev/ceo
and AI "ied products
90 CViutch St Mew >rbrk
ifeoffor RAJSInG
FLOUR
Especially Prepared For
Biscuits. Cakes and Puddings
Tea
CoflQQ
We sell direct to the people
James V&n Dyk Co
JO Barclay Street, N.Y
Stores and Agenc/ei Esarynhene
T1
1<?
OOVEN
AUTOMATIC
TYPEWRITER
b
Does th? work of Tour lypifts
at the vcgffj of one
C-<? typisti salary buys it
HOOVLN SERVICE. Inc.
117 West 46-Street KWYork
7*fop/iorta Rr^ant ,*61)
THIBAUT
?for wall papers
RICHARD E THIBAUT Inc.
.'.53 Madiaort Av& Nw VtorA.
Franklin Prices
$2700\Sedan. $3700
Xli0t)r'Pa,,en2er
i Runabout ivith
Winter top, $2850
fourint,
Runabout,
4-Passenger
Roadster,
Brougham, $3600\Demi Sedan, $3050
f. o. ft. Syracuse
FRANKLIN MOTOR CAR CO.
OF NEW YORK
1828 Broadway, New York
(?tenn ,t. Tisdale, President
(?lenn IK. Tisdale, .Secretary
m.
OSTER
dverttairig
IWNB NORDHEM CO
8Weat 40,h New-York
QeefSiedk Parties
APRONS AND
7XWOS RENTED
SHELDON COAT& APUOM SUPPLY
Chrjs E A bbott. Prop.
?563-lO'Avt' ? To I Chelsea 9523
EATON 6
GETTINGER
DEPENDABLE PRINTERS
NIGHT and DAY SERVICE
263 Nit\tlv Ax-?-i\uc
Tel CKelseo S660
"Mischos
I tOkasc 39 Street IJ.Y
{PTJRRIKI^S
Furs of Drpr.'i</r?Wp Quality
iNlD ? 'O -? 'J
HULLGRIPPEN&CO
HARDWARE TOOLS ? CUTLERY
AunnoenE. ? lcctqical. OLunBf ^s.
B j'l pcRz> pain muz, supplies
Phar.e GRANERCY5 306-M THIRD AV.
LUTZ&
SHEINKMAN
LITHOGRAPHERS
2 Duane St., N.Y
Slectric Irons
f 7.5o up
I
1/ you haven't enjoyed tlie
?id of Electric Appliance* <11
your daily housework, begin
now with an Electric Iron.
A practical te?;r will convinc
ingly demonstrate tne effi
ciency, economy and labor
saving of this modern house
hold convenience.
On Uenionstialujn anJ Sale at
the United Electric Shops |
?r l? Unitis [uct>ic licxr & >Wti to
!30 E??t I5tli Street
r?.h St. ? Brmdwiy :??!> St. 4 Brmttnr
I
ALEXANDER HAMILTON
'NST(TOT?
Course in Executive Training
13 AstorPlAce, New York.
7??e> <y?ntt?r oTMusic&t /TfewYvA
?and tfie Home a? 3orv/c&
VICTROLAS
and PIANOS
427-5'"Ave C j5V42St
Planting the
Seed of Loyalty
IF you should take a boy into your home,
allow him to shift for himself and find,
after a time, that he has become disloyal to
you, would you place the blame wholly on
his shoulders, or would you be inclined to
take a bit yourself? Having taken him into
your home, was it not your duty to try to
destroy all that was unworthy in him, and
develop all that was best?
The Greatest Home in the World
Every year Uncle Sam takes into this, the greatest
home in the world, thousands of boys. Boys who are
born on American soil and boys who are brought here
from other lands. Most of these boys are allowed to
shift for themselves. That a great number of them
become disloyal has been more apparent these
last few months in the many riots, disastrous strikes,
bolshevik meetings, etc., which cause the hearts of
true Americans to become heavy in their breasts.
Planting the Seed of Loyalty
There is much talk about planting the seed of
loyalty; but the many theories advanced are, some of
them impractical", all of them wrong in their point
of attack. The seed of loyalty, if it is to bear the rich,
full bloom that brings national happiness, must be
planted in young hearts and brains; in the hearts of
boys and girls who will be makers and executors of
American prosperity.
The Rotary Club of New York has carried on a
wonderfully successful Boys' Work Campaign for two
years. The club feels that it is time to give all men and
women who are interested in boys and in the future
welfare of this country the benefit of its experience
and also to consider any plans and theories which
others may care to advance.
Rotary's Public -Forum
For that reason, he Board of Directors of the Rotary Club
of New York has sanctioned the plan of the Boys' IVork.
Commit ee in organizing a Public Forum for the benefit
of all boy workers, to meet on Thursday nights for eight
sessions, beginning March 10 and ending April 28, at
the Russell Sage Building. 110 East 22nd St., at 8 P. M.
Sharp.
Under the non-partisan leadership of Rotary, an
opportunity will be afforded all boys workers to become
better equipped for their task. The eight sessions will
be held without fee or obligation of any kind. It is
hoped that everyone who finds it possible will take
advantage of this public forum to do his bit toward
learning how to "plant the seed of loyalty" in American
boys.
EjH GATTLE cCO. Jvuvi*
Loss -Dama<^ -I )elay
Next Isiuc. Times, March 14. 192!
GEHRING
I-IOTE3CL- REVIEW
GEKR.7JG HOTEL DIRtXTOKY
OFFICIAL METRDPOUUM GUIDE
R?tarlar. CHARLSS GSHR1/JC 147b 3UJy ' j
"Rees
"Rees
Cleaners & Dyers
If you want your white gloves
to rnme back to you rpotless
odorless and as soft as v. her
thty were new, have Rees and
Rees clean them
232-236 East 40th Street, N. Y. C.
Tel. Murray Hill 4561-4562-4563
?
?
?
COAIS
ANTHRACITE
BITUMINOUS
DOUGLASS BARNES !
CORPORATION ?
5"Ave. and 53aSt. Art*w York ?
:ADL?S DOUDAiJCO ANY COO'. ? |
-f EC
BRUNSWICK-BALKE
COLLENDER CO.
wbr/c/ /c&a/c-s in
Billiard and
B o \yvTi tt cp
Equipment
29-35 West 32 St.
FLOWER STEEL
ELECTROTYPE Co.
4ol Eic$!ith Lon^dcre 2870-1-2
| j 210 William St To! Degkrmn 1331
The Rotary Club of Seic York is an organization oj men representing all lines of
Lorr.mercial activity. It> purpoie is to lift men and buslm?? to a high ethical letel. Headquarttn
1 22d floor. Hotel McAlpin *
* if L tV wV'S '
Vh > ...* ; -.vl ^4 1 '!',.* j
A,, v -in iMg
REAL ESTATE
Service
uPHILLIPS^i
E&L<xbli9t)9&
l-=i8 West 72"- StyreoL
'.Q^E ^y &. Q'wy cor.170 3t
MATT UvHON
rhf bos: WM?fe>
a| yiotel
| Claridge
NEW -TORK
TIIK celebrities of three worlds
?theatrical, social and busi
ness?frequent the Claridge, part
ly 1 x'causf it is at the doorstef) of
all New N ork. gayety, hut chiefly
l>ecause it offers sueh splendid
opportunities for entertainment.
Direction of
L. M. Boomer
Broadway at 44th Street
VVILLOUGHBY'S
110 W.:i2dSt. Opp. tiimbols
Headquarters for Lenses
HauM'h & Lomb Kosh
Cooke
Goer/.
Carl Ztfiss
Wollcnuak
NEW
NETHERLAND
BANK
41 Vest 34th 5treet New York
SAFE ? DEPOSIT-VAULTS
SCHINDLER.Im
INVKSTIC-ATORS
Conduct ronf: llH)Ulrlrs for hi
tonicy*. corpciratloiil :n d Inilli IiIuhi
An urxanli'itlon of i"klll?d Invrstiv^
t?i? and Inrtt:,trl*l ?(irk>*rs utiil.i .
n'A"n~- ???cpi
Hdqtrf siNcrn nid^ 7ci corti*n?if,sioi
iU ">our
CVoi/rts to t.'ier
EQUITY FRf TGHT
CLAIMS BUREAU
350 Bmotiway
I KASTENH LJBBR
AND LEHRFELD
! |
and Refiners
of Precious totals,
14 John. 3',
Cort 5737
, AWNINGS
Flac> Decorations
; I McHUGH MFG. CO
| JR. McleiOuo. 317W3S"'t>l
J
BUTTLE
for FLOORS
BUTTLE PAPCUKT FL-OOa CO 1
?>OT W e! it. i.cr'iact-a
(TWKere
Columbus
_ m w meets
Broadway
at 66tJX
Lj )ft Stree-t
WEAVER
SELLS
OOOD
CLOTHES
I I
Vulcan
CIAS ltAN'GE6
Gooc' Hztry of iho
:a m r~7 Chniw CV>
;o'W32"'Sf. A*cv.
Drink More RireMilk
Sheffield farms
GradQA
SqqIqct
Milt.? Cream 1~3urtar::iilk.
BOURNONVILLE
WELDING OQ ,
24IV/S4" Stiefi N'Y t
Zc\mpicn Bros.
13a/cars of delightful
I French bread and roih
' 17 Cornelia 5r . New York.
_
| A Lumber \ard just off Broadway
WRIGHT LUMBER CO
140 152 W 30,J St.
Also Sash. Doors, t-leuldmq 2tc. |
A CREATIVE arl
vertising organi
zation that cuts
down on an appropria
tion as often as it "jacks"
it up.
Place your account, where it can be handled
On Inspiration!
THE
THE germ <>f inspiration
is the leaven of all
business triumphs. A man
cannot be time-clocked on
inspiration. It comes to
him at out-of-the-way mo
ment s.
At these moments he wilt dic
talr u letter tlmt inuy brin*,' u
year's contract or avert an un
pleasant conflict. I'in him to
certain time?and his letter
is a failure!
Thai is why The Dictaphone
?hould he at every man's el
bow. It absorbs spontaneous
thoughts that are valuable.
1 'lit them on paper at a typistN
convenience* but they remain
an inspiration!
MCWftWE
Made by th? Columbia. Oraphoohcric Co.
Phone Vorth 7230 Call at 2QO Broadway
AW

xml | txt