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The New York herald. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, March 22, 1921, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045774/1921-03-22/ed-1/seq-8/

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Lincoln
Trust
Company
7 Wall Str?et
204 Fifth A??n?*
M< Broadway
72nd St. U Broadway
Capital $2,000,000
Surplus ?1.000,000
c?w*uttt Banking \i Trail ftrwiu
Durrmc if Ftreii*
Artemisia's
Mausoleum
When Mausolus. King of
Carta died, hi* widow, Arte
misia decided to erect Over
his remains the world'* most
magnificent tomb. She em
ployed the most famous
sculptors of ancient times,
hut before the tomb was
finished, she died.
These sculptors completed
their task because they loved
their work, and considered
this monument the most
glorious triumph of art the
world had ever 6cen.
The unacfeatable desire of
man for better things, lives
and acts ? in aft. in com
merce and in industry - and
now i n advertising. The higix
standard of s$n ice rendered
our clients is proof of our
aim for better advertising.
Frank Kieman & Co.
Two Generation of
Advertising Experience
135 Broadway New York
Phone K?C tor 1252
BOOK NEWS
ijH
ON MARCH 25TH
Will be published
The Peace
Negotiations
A Personal Narrative
ROBERT LANSING
This book will be for ial*
in all our stores or msy
be rented ? Send your
order today.
t* F. ?:? SI. ;i M . 4-, .?r
:vjn-w.< ?? ?,.>. ?
Ilolel Bontu, fl'wa* <?i st
ranfi Central i?*riiilnnl
Il?T?r\ Mftlkftlt. for. ll'v.a,.
i. JACOBS & CO.
C eiifTiers n
Smart Cowns, Svit* and Wrap
c! tie Highest Cttoa.
l or Immediate
Delivery
or to Order.
A wide range at
attractiv- nric*''
O VVcst 46th St
?"fc
$ Easter Books ?
ffc Fin# Fxliihiti of fairIUH ?*??
&
I
1
P??rt?, Ortotioml flnok*,
blbli1* and l'r?v*r Rant*
BUTTON'
681 Fifth Arenue
Oppome Sl.Tboma*'# (.iitirr)t
S
Jfoyt's Service, Inc.
PLA NCSEi>
A&VEUT l&ING
fHSWtst SindStrrJt, >V V C J
tur'tunp i<^ ixo'cip >,
ALLEN'S FOOT-EASE OuES 17.
fchefi ulimi plnrii or Mjm nnil 'mi !m
#?* a p?i !<?*<) of AM.KX * )?'?'>'
r,tlK. tti<> an'iMptJr ("?" ?!< i to ?'? ? niinn
Int? ft* ?hooo, It taVi s th? on* of
fnrt* am hunlon?. !natat'* r?tl?t tf>
?mfcHtn#. V'ilnir, .? vnlli- i t**i. I. . rnw-l
T>n(M<U of IK) rter fnr tfc r ft n. r? (!??<"<t li)
?if Army *ti?l Navy ()?-! .? ;? ft.
' 11" 1 1
Everything About!
Cutxcura Soap j
Suggests Efficiency |
SsLi ">? <
A
ATTERBURY CALLS
NATIONAL RULES
COLLAR ON ROADS
Charges Agreements I sed
to Extract Money on
Technicalities.
(?LASHES WITH WALSH
Insists Each Road Should
Xfo-ot iate With Its Own
Employees.
INITIATIVE IS DESTROYED
Warns That Nationalisation
and Syndicalism Are
Dangerously Near.
Chicago. March 21.?Gen. W. W. |
Atterbury. vice-president of the Penn-i
?ylv*ilia Railroad and former chair
man of the railway executives' labor i
committee, took aji emphatic stand!
against national agreements, which he
termed "prolific of misunderstandings,"
in a heated all-day cross-examination
before the Railroad Labor Board to
day.
Questioning by FYank P. Walsli. j
counsel for the union, brought vigor- !
ous replies from Gen. Atterbury, and j
time and again the witness replied by]
cross-questioning his interrogator, j
Charges that the union leader# did not j
really represent the employees, and
that national rnle* were used to pro- j
cure employment for more men and <
extract money from the roads on j
technicalities wore hurled across the j
table as the General took the stand i
against all rules of national applica- j
tlon.
Atterbory'l Tcatimen j.
The glut of Gen. Atterbury'a testi
mony may be summarised thus:
Ttulee should be negotlatfd between
fifDoials of the road* and their own em
ployees :n rri;-- the conference table "like
(i game of poker."
The eight ??'?our day could not be uni
versally aplied to all ' mployees, espe
cially train sorviee mon, "hecAuae the
r.ord didn't build the railroads that
way."
The establishment of the hourly basl.?
of shop wo! it has destroy* d the energy
I inlti."t'vo of >hop employees and
Blvj M in of pie<-e work would be the
"ivofrt dreadful thin; that could happen
to rp.ilroad employees."
National rules > onstituted a dog col
Hr around the nfecka of the railroads/
.?lilch rould b> froo to negotiate their
nwi\ rule- with their' own employees "the
in In u t ?? 'lie board cuts the dog collar."
?:i Att' rbviry w is referring io a car*
? >pi from ;i laii'ir paper representing
' ctional Itgn > ments a?> a collar on a
dog. 1:, ivied "railroads" and led by
"la'?!*."
Two I'li'.r v ;? ?c ? ;ist union official?
were laid down i?y t1'" General In the
c'liwi*- oi t lie day's testimony. He de
?: fii i.'iit although the national aRT^e
ii i r*;<? had the object of emn!o|4ng more
men. i'< ta,i "? better friend of my men
ihan any of the union men at this
table." The declaration brought from
Mi. Walsh a query whether Gen. Atter
bury i presented th" section hatida of
his road.
"No." but you do not. Those Vnon
sre not represented lure." Gen. Atter
bury replb-d.
(intck llrtortu Marie.
Soon. a'terward In a dim:up?.on of
spt effle rulea (?en. Attirburjr demanded
that the rules be Interpreted clearly ard
word* defined. Mr. Wal?h ?aid he
thought th" ordinary meaning of won!.,
applied. This brought a quick retort
from the v.ltnesj: "Yes, but w'i.-h
it comes to devising meana and methods
of getting money out of a rule j ou gen
tlemen ar?' the most expert of any I
know."
"The*o rules appear very clear to me,
flen. \tterbury," Mr. W?W> said.
"That's >>? niise you don't know anj
tiilrn; ?'bout them." the witness replied.
Gen. Atterbury mhintalned throughout
the dny (hat no net of rule* could be
negotiated which would have a national
application, and declared the only satis
faitoiv way of agreeing on rules waa
v. d ren conference between the officers
who would apply the rules and the em
pieyees whom they would affect.
In iii t> ilmony Gen. Atterbury s?Id
je nit?Hyi? h-id hcen abl" to negotiate
? itii hb employees, but that the national
ngivxments had placed a dog collar "n
the nd that .t was Impossible to
i infer ? ith the Pennsylvania employ, r-f
aut-e of th- interference of union of
fl? I-.i* He re,nl from a-veral Am' r>a i
Feij.ci: 011 of I.abor bulletins. i*hlch, he
m id. "throU i i the employees."
Gen. \tt "bur- a statement
esrller n the i, declared the
American people had r?;i bed "the part
ing of the ways."
"No mop serious question confronts
u* to-day." he said. "One road leads to
Government ownership, nationalization,
Plumb plan-b rt and ay nd lea II mi; the
other road to Industrial pence and the
continuation ff that individual Initiative,
energy a'id responsibility which Is pe
culiarly Wi'ileae The sign board on
oik road Is 'national agreements'; or
the Mi! er roiii negotiate directly with
your own r'in,ii iyee?'."
RAILWAY MARINE WORKERS
HERE ACCEPT CUT IN WAGES
f'r~T 'turn* froir First Pagi
?I 'lutJip'OC* for the roads in their con
with employee*.
*ho|? M^ii to ll?ld Mprl(ng.
A meeting of the employees of the
north Jersey division of the Central
Hail road of Xew Jersey, all of whom
?ire a (factefl by the proposed redu rion
n wages, will be held tomorrow attor
noon in Sauerwein's Hall in Jersey City,
i u> receive the report from B. M. Jewell,
1 president of the International Union of
Railroad Employees. and to eomptle
' their answer to the wage proposal*)
; .vhlch will bo sent on Thursday to Will
iam G. Bealer, president of the road,
rhia was announced last night at a
meeting of the Boilermaker*' Union by
1 Cliarie>" A. Maclntosch. representing the
i employee*.
l.a^t night's session was called to dis
fUB? the proposed wtgC reduction, but
. ot for the purpos ? of taking any defi
nite action. Two thousand of the idle
workers of the road were present, most
EMPLOYEES ACCEPT
52 CENTS A DAY CUT
Strike Arrested on Boston and
Lynn Railroad.
Boston, Mfirch 21.?Tho threatened
strike of employees of the Boston, He
vere Bcach and Lynn Railroad, a nar
row gauge line, wns a\ertPd to-da> when,
the men accepted a wag> cut of about
fifty-two cent.-' a day The company hod
proposed a reduction of eight}-~u\en
cents.
Settlement of the difficulties between
officials of the road and representatives
of the railroad unions was effected to
day by the State Board of Conciliation
and Arbitration. Under the agreement
working conditions will be changed. A
run of 100 miles will constitute a day's
work, as at present. Instead of the 108
mile run proposed by the company.
The revised wage schedule was to
have gone into effect Marah 17, but m fter
a vote the employees declared In favor of
a str kft if the reduction were made. The
matter was taken before the State I
board and postponement of a week in tlie ;
operation of the schedule was agreed ,
upon.
NEWLANDS ACT TO BE
DEFENDED IN GEORGIA
United States Takes Hand in
Birmingham Rail Case.
,.
Atlanta, March Si.?The Department
of Justice Will take a hand Iti the At
lanta. Birmingham and Atlantic Hallway
wago hearing in Federal District Court
here to-morrow to defend the constitu
tionality of tlie Xewlands act, it was
announced to-night by I'nlted States
District Attorney Alexander.
That portion of the law provMing
twenty days' notice b fore reduction of
waives was attacked as unconstitutional
In a brief flied on behalf of tlie Birming
ham Trust and Savings Company. Mr.
Alexander announced that Attorney
General Daughei ty had instructed him
to enter the cuse for the purpose of up
holding the act.
Resumption of local freight and pas
seng< r service throughout the Atlanta.
Birmingham and Atlantic system, with
the exception of the Waycroas division,
was announced to-day by P.. I,. Miners,
recelvir. New men are being put to I
wo11; daiiy Hill'k the places of .-inkers, !
It wa.s sa'-J, and lull sch^NWes toon were :
predict-d.
3RIBERY OF FEDERAL
EMPLOYEES CHARGED
Alexander Milburn Company
Makes Accusations.
Baltimore. March 21. ?Ciiargcs of!
bribing arid corrupting employees of the ;
War and Nav> departments. the Untied I
States Railroad Administration and'
ether no*' run at tenth .< . ro made In j
,,n amended deelai at*mi filed in the I
United State* t >urt to- lay by the Alex- j
ander Milburn ('ompanj in a $;.500,w00 1
.suit fihd l ust Dc-eri.i. r.
The suit, brought under the Sherman
;.n?l Clayton anti-tru-a ;.i-.vs, i- u rected
iigawist the Union Carbide and Carbon
Corpoi atIon. the Union C.irhid> Com
pany, the l.'nion Ccblde Sales <"? n.pany.
tlx Oxweld Acetylene C^mpar.:. the
i Ox Wold I tali road Ser let ?" - ;i >a-i . the
' Untie Air Products Company, t.ie Pre.?t
o-I.lte Compat ;-. Inc.. and tfie Da.vi.1
Bonrnonviil'. Company.
! WARFIELD TO GET HEARING.
I. ( . t. In Poa? on Hh Pisn l?
tnarr Knilivitv Kates
! i-pecial Dispatch to Tun v?w Vo?k Haur.p.
\rw ^ ork llrrald Kurr:?n. I
Wafdilngton, II. ( March SI. j
Assurance* wero snven to-day by Scn
| ator Ctmmilns (la.). Chairman of ti e
1 Interstate Commerce Commltte.', that a
hearing will be given to p. Davfea War
II'Id, president of the National As^ocia
ilon of Railroad tfeeuiitles Owwi". on
iiis proposal for Imi roving ralTrc. d man
agement by the establishment of na
tional itkOway service
Mr. Warfielrl eal'.< >1 on S< r.ator Cum
mins to-day and gave jilm a detailed
description of hlx profKwsM whioh is
aimed to lower rates, Increase tranapof
t- r ion facilities and reduce operation
cost?".
Si nator Cummins would not comment
because he said he had not read tlv
Proposal. He did say. however, that
the Interstate Commerce Commission
will hold a series of hearings on rail
rn><i problems after Congress meets 111
.v;i 1 and that Mr. Warfield and tho*
.^soclated with him would be given full
i |>iMirtunity to present their scheme In
detail.
m
?e
\vM\
IIM
m
is *1'
vM
m
m
"Princess" Stockings for
Easter Morning?$4.00
I I is an old belief that every
woman should wear three new
rhinos on Easter morning.
And a pair of Peck & Feck'I
"Princess" stockings of long wear
ing sheer silk, is a very happy be
ginning of the list. They are sheer,
durable and smart and their price
is :t pair. ( Tax 20c)
PECKKPECK
c.SVi /? t'th 'fi'enuf
?,-,?/ Fifth
A!.-'> AT 4
At P?:m Br icii
rn ?<c
O. Ml( illCiAN noi I I V \RD, 1 : I' \(.U
S WiilN At r iii'imfr
, 1.000 worker* who nr . 4 nd *bout
Ing that Mr Jewell will V?e
Ohlcaso to-morrow ,7t h? . .?rd, rrom
the testimony of Mr r ,of
Wage Labor Board. whfehts n^??T
sion there. This word ^2 e
w!l: determlr* the , hir Jter'o^th . f
whieh the emplov. es ? i r'p,y
Uesler on Thursday ' "<>nd ,0 Mr
General Chairman Enke of ,h. t u. w
Valley Railway Srstem iv ? L*h,*tl
United Brotherhood o? ?' *5
! Way Employee, and Raffia ?'
! borers ?ala yestcrday Vl/ fh"P
eommlttee of the Uhlgh
ployee* wlli submit to ?v. v?'<ey ?m
refusal to ac cept th " ^ ?22any "
proposal, offered by th^a-??
also rr. rlve'a^efiipfi ?t,5rso-v would
'nThiTSa^^ga*'from ,t8
-4. fi. A. RECEIVER ASSAILS
LABOR BOARD RULING
Unconstitutional, Sayn Brief
Filed by Official.
CrncAoo, March 21.?The constitu
tionality of the Kai]road Labor Board's
tr " tiU' ca*> ^ the Atlanta,
minKn;tm Atlantic Railroad was
? .ia..eng>d to-dav when the board re
celved i brief filed hv th? .. >?
u "J t ie roads re
'?? H. i. Bugg, formerly president
of the load. The employee* wore rep
resented at the hearing to-day by E.
'? Curt!*, vice-president of the Order
&??K WSJ wh0
?>oS rd'Trd^^"-^1
road was financially unfc*?Q to pay and I
that since such a situation ^idhlve
meant confiscation of the property I
a ruling by the board wu? -Z
>?u,c nfth ,m?S, STtt.'SSSS
ta'timf oTih",' ""jr ? "
clared tat,?S DiSt,''Ct Coj"' K
tr t ^'ast ,;f'fiuct,on wa. placed in ef
fect March X. 1921, by court oMer after
? dispute between errmlovee* Yv
road bad failed of settlement. Tki m t'
contention of the roa,. ^
losing $100,000 u monu,. ,t pro^d te
reduce wages by one-h?lf of tb*
>h ^ eram?d December Si ioj;
Sm??? "rr' n""' that
abi.ftv to pay war. without lis jurisdic
tion find remanded the cae? for furth .
So?T th? Cair,?r an'J
PAINTERS' STRIKE ENDS;
WAGE TO BE $9 A DAY
slnWast6 Zf'}:iTr* whlch 'asted
, . '^?f ?September and which It 1?
vei'tirdav'^Ir'fl "l??
reprevenii ?ir emTi ?' ur"an,zation<<
Bi Id'rs iXe " y"rS MJ"' al
rtnlei T^c,t""b'<-, :u West Thirty-third
Pour main points wpiv- 1 .
Lhw7n
? n. o tit I'lunnlng of n .s.nfev
ii I ' ' 1 il worl<in?f agreement for
hour eV'V"* "f " 'K' s "l ? 1 - ?n|
?>f ?! 'w,,Vi i, .J ?' l!"' rt*coirnltlon
? King neck ()f flvf,
hour.- ea.-h. PMntet?: he.caftcr will tfkn
was'^Mcd tof ,,nr 'r'^ strike
wns c,.ll(d toi force a wag.- of ?lfi u jltv I
I lie orsanfSatlons represented nt the'
SSte rn" '"rad^
; n^ ;: ^r?T.c ation,,N A^auo.,
Sociefv of m i ? a,,,! 'Jcoorator? the
...? 1 ' ?'?ntcrs mid D.???oi.ttors ??.<.
< ablnet Makers Employer A?socla
To ?'inployi rs, and th. Rrother
1 01 ? ;i,nlf r". HecoratorM and Paper- |
h.T,".S.?/ :>nd the NVw ^frli
.Vo. 9 t ounc" of thp Pa Intern Union, '
rt agreed that the employers1 or
ganization* .elect one arbitrator the
employees organisations one. and that
the^e two choose ?n umpire .o uTat ^!
OSSr ,n future be settled by arbi J
16 ARE ACQUITTED IN
FELTS MURDER CASE
Defendants Are Still l'nd?T
Indictments Charg-insr Them
With Other Crimes.
LEAVE FOR THEIR HOMES I
Troopers With Riot Guns Pa
trol Streets of Williamstown,
Which Remains Quiet.
VA ii.liamsok, W. Va.. March 21.?
Police Chief Hid Hatfield and fifteen
other men of Matcwwi. found not jpillty
to-day of connection with the death of
Albert C. Felts, n_ prlvato detective, last
May, left for their home town lato to
day.
Unless there U a change of plana,
however, they will be free a short time.
Judge R. IX Bailey announced during
the A.ft<?rnoon that the next case would
be called April 12. There are still six
Indictments against the sixteen men
freed by a Jury this morning, one each
In connection with the deaths of six
Baldwin-Felts detectives who fell mor
tally wounded with Felts during the
street battle.
V large ero*d grttierod about the
court house during the day in the hofl<
that the defendants would appear. They
were doomed to disappointment, how
ever, for the Matcwanlans remained In
the custody of Sheriff A. C. Pinson until
they left for the little mining town at
4 :45 P. M.
State troopers stalked the streets of
Williamson all day, carrying riot guns,
but the city remained quiet, and not a
?ingle untoward incident was reported.
Th?- defendants had nothing to say re
garding the verdict of "not guilty," and
they received the news of their acquittal
6oberly.
After the verdict was announced.
Wad? Bronson, Prosecuting Attorney Of
Mliiffo county, handed his resignation to
Jurixre B. D. Bailey, who accepted It,
effective April 1. Mr. Bronson said ttouf
the salary attached to the position wan
Insufficient to m&Tntain his family and
thst he would devoto himself to the
prsotlee ot law.
Samuel D. Stokes, City Solic'tor of
Williamson, was named by Judge Bailey
to succeed Mr. Bronson. When notified
of his appointment Mr. Stokes declared
that an Prosecutor of Mingo country he
was determined to maintain law and
order in the county.
Twenty-threo men of Matewan were
Indicted by a Grand Jury at Williamson
In connection with the death of l>**ltfl.
At the outset of the trial, which began i
on January 26, the cases a(raln.it several
of the defendants were dismissed, and
ax the taking of testimony progressed
others were discharged on motion of
the prosecution.
MATEWAN HAS HOLIDAY
TO GREET 16 ACQUITTED
Matewan, W. Va., March 2J.?Thh- |
little mining village called ft a holldu.v |
to-day to greet the sixteen mountaineers,
defendants in the Matewan bu.Uln trial. |
who were found not guilty by a Circuit
Court Jury at Williamson this morning.
Apparently :ill resident* of the town
were at tho station late In tlio day when
the train which brought home Sid Hat
lield, Chief of Police, and his fifteen
companions, puCfed in. A special car was
attached to tho train for tJie oonvenlence
of the hlllmen and their bodyguard,
which was made up o' Sheriff A. r.
Plncon, eix deputies. Captain Brocku?
1 i n 8tH.li) troopers.
It was a touch!r:? scene as the sixteen
oped froro the train und rus'
Into the arms of relatives and friends.
Women lauKheil and cried alternately,
and-for an hour*tho formir baitle trial
defendants wort- kept busy shaking the ,
hands of men. wonv?n and children who
flocked to the station for tho "home
coming "
snoPMrv to bk i, *in okf.
Trot, starch 81, Mor>e than l,Of'f> '
men employed by the Delaware and .
Hudson Company In the rallroajd shop?
at Colonic and Green Island will be laid
off indefinitely next Saturday, accord
ing to notices posted in tho shops this j
afternoon.
CABINET HEARS
PACKERS AND MEN
Administration Makes First
Effort to Mediate Major
Labor Dispute.
HOPE TO AVERT STRIKE
Discussions Resumed To-day?
President May Be Taken
Into Conferenee.
Washington. March 21.?After three
hours and a half iri conference with
Secretaries Davis. Hoover and Wallace,
representatives of the live leading pack- j
ers and of their union employees ad- i
journed late to-day, to meet to-morrow |
afternoon. Nona ot those participating
in the conference would make any state
ment as tx> the progress of the Initial
efforts oif tho new Administration in
mediating a major labor dispute.
Representatives of the packers and of
the employees, after conference, stated
that Secretary Davis had requested all
parties to make no statements regarding
the status of the dteensnionn. Tlie Labor i
Secretary also sent word by his privnto !
secretary to ii>nvsp?T>pr men that he had i
nothinsr to say regflrding the conference i
and announced that the discussions :
would be resumed to-morrow after tho I
regular Tue?d?y Cabinet meeting:, prob
ably at 3 o'clock, but earllor If possible.
Tho fact there are to be no morning
conferences was taken to Indicate that
Secretary Davis might bring the matter
as revealed at to-day's preliminary
meeting to the attention of President
Wardincr and other members of the Cab
inet. The recess also will allow the
representatives of both sides to confer
with their advisers or ask for further
instructions. Secretary Davis remained
in conference after the session with
Hugh L?. Kerwin, K. P. March and
Howell Davis of the Labor Department's
board of conciliators, who sat in the
conference by virtue of the fact that
they had a part in tho agreement of
1919 by the packers and their employees
to extend the Alschuler agreement of
1917.
The packers' representatives, Carl
Meyer and James L. Condon, were un
derstood to have finished stating their
case at 4 o'clock, having been inter
rupted by few questions from the em
ployees. Whether the greater part of
the remaining hour and a half was con
sumed by the employees in presenting
their side was not indicated. None of
the conferees would indicate whether
there was cause for hope that the ques
tions at issue might be adjusted and a
strike avertefl.
Secretary Davis heard the employes?
side of the controversy at 11 o'clock,
after both sides had assembled and the
meeting had been adjourned until 3
o'clock. The I^abor Secretary in grant
ing a private lioarlng to Dennis Lane,
secretary of the unions, and Redmond
S. Brennan, their attorney, gave them
the same privileges he had previously
given Messrs. Condon and Meyer.
The full conference began at 2 o'clock,
with the three Cabinet members, the two
representatives of each side and the
three members of the Labor Depart
ment's conciliation board present. Two
official reporters worked In shifts taking
the testimony.
ADS RESUMED IN BINGHAMTON. j
Heretisiitt .fnbllinit When I'll per*
Hit by Strike Aid Them.
Blnohamton, March 21.?Bingham-1
ton newspapers to-day resumed the pub
lication of display advertising, and mer
chants who had stocked up for the
Easter trade and wore unnble to adver
tise their wares are Jubilant. Pub
lishers suy that within a week or ten
days th6y will be back on a normal
basid.
The striking printers remain firm in
thiir demands and are equally confident
that they will be nble to break Into the
ranks of the non-union men. They say
that serious attempt* to Induce non
union printers to leave the city will not
be made until the publishers attempt to
roplaco the strikebreakers with non
union men who are seeking permanent
positions.
Our Banking Knowledge and
Experience for\our Benefit
J UST as our downtown office at Wall and Nassau
Streets and our Fifth Avenue office at Fifth
Avenue and 42nd Street are in the heart of the busi
ness sections of the city, so this Company itself is
at the heart of many important business trans
actions.
L.-jstrM
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;
I Iritis mit;
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The knowledge and exper
ience gained from this
close contact with large
financial affairs form part
of our working assets,
helping us to give better
service to a great variety
of customers.
Though your financial
problems be large or small,
you can consult us with
the assurance that this
Company will do its best
to help you solve them.
Bankers Trust Company
Member Fedoml Rescrre System
ItawBtftMra OfDfitt
i? Wall Slr??t
Pari# Off ft*?
9 R?e St. Florrntln
Fifth Atksm Otflcai
at ?Snd Street
OMcm 4mr Trmrmln: 18 PUom V-.fci-..
An Investment Maxim
Don't think you are investing when gram
are reaJly buying for a rise.
The only excuse for doing this Is thai
you have put most of your savings where
they cannot be lost and are playtng with
the rest of them because you can afford to
do so and lose if you must.
The part you cannot afford to lose yarn
should put into Guaranteed Mortgages and
Mortgage Certificates. 6745 small investors
put $12,163,000 into these certificates last
year ana have chosen the wiser course.
Title Guarantee & Trust Cf>.
I 76 Broadway, New York City
175 Rcmaeii Street, Brooklyn
At The New York Spring
RAW FUR
AUCTION SALE
The following merchandise will be placed on sale for
the account of shippers and sold without reserve to
the highest bidder on
APRIL 11th
and the days following at
MASONIC HALL
71 West 23rd St. New York City
DOMESTIC
2080
300
6400
50700
21200
4500
8800
65100
300
250
225
6100
300
16500
270
23000
27500
10000
342000
21000
2000
1025
200
1800
42400
16000
559
1100
11000
2350
29000
125
116000
500
Badger
Bear
Beaver
Civet Cat
House Cat
Ringtail Cat
Wild Cat
Ermine
Fisher
Blue Fox
Cross Fox
Grey Fox
Kitt Fox
Red Fox
Silver Fox
400
1000
425
4000
1300
48000
380000
9000
279000
1500
60000
600
198000
21000
100
FOREIGN
Australian Fox 450
Australian Opossum 529000
Tasmania Opossum 12000
lbs. Australian & New 1700
Zealand Rabbit 87000
Aus. Ringtail Opossum 1100
Caracul 3800
Chinchilla 20000
Chinchilla (Dressed) 57500
Chinese Civet Cat 10824
Fitch
Hare
Japanese Fox
Japanese Marten
Kolinsky
Kangaioo
Persian Lamb
Leopard
Marmot 5000
Baum Marten 9300
White Fox
White Fox Paws
Lynx
Marten
Marten Tails
Mink
Muskrat
Muskrat (Black)
Opossum
Otter
Raccoon
Seal (Alaska)
Skunk
Wolf
Wolverine
Stone Marten
Mole
Nutria
Pony
Rabbit
Russian Sable
Seal (Hair)
Shiraz
Squirrel
Sundry Fox
(Anatolian)
(French)
(Indian)
(Italian)
(Karagan)
(Macedonian)
(Patagonian)
(Spanish)
Wallaby
Wombat
Also sundries consisting of (400) Japanese Badger,
(1298) Hungarian Cat, (900) Chinchilla Rat, (2200)
Guanaco, (450) Goat, (2500) Mongolian Lamb, (400)
Flying Squirrel, (400) Wallaroo.
Goods will he on display at our
warehouse at 550 West 36th Street
and catalogs will be issued begin
ning April 6 th.
Purchasers will be allowed a discount of 1% on all
nmounts paid on or before May 31, 1921, which is th*
Prompt Day for th- coming sale. All goods must be
cleared and paid for on or before Aug. 29, 1921.
Australian and New Zealand Rabbit will be shown
at 516-520 West 36th St.
New York Fur Auction Sales Corp.
550-552 West 36th Street Nov York
business men
have asked?
?
n
"Why is The Herald so wide
ly quoted for financial news
by other financial news
agencies?"
?Because The Herald's
Financial Pages are Com
plete, Accurate, Exception
ally Well Edited and contain
?nuch valuable information
not found elsewhere.
Therefore, you may be sure
you are THOROUGHLY
posted when you read The
Herald daily.
Turn to the Financial Section now!
THE NEW YORK HERALD
Say HERALD to your newsdealer ench morning!

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