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The New York herald. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, March 25, 1921, Image 9

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SUCCESSES
It is bccausc we arc at all
times keenly interested in
saving money and time for
our clients, that we are
identified with so many
buildings that are solid
financial successes.
Put it up to uti to
put it up for you!
THOMPSON-STARRETT
COMPANY
Building Construction
"Morgan Lln?"
To New Orleans
Pan*enffer salUnzK ??very Saturday,
freight service Wednetdoyii ft Saturday*.
To Galveston
FYHjcht strumer* Wednesday* mid Sat*.
Through tickets and freight s??r/lcc to
tTtflstsBtppi, Loulflnna, T**a*, Mw.tco*
Morr Mexico, Arizona, California, Okla
10 ma. Colorado, Kevadp, Orr/r^n. Trans
pacific.
SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO.
^ortl'dt 4H00. 163 Broudvrny. Room 201.r>.
TRIMO
THE WORD THAT STANDS FOR
Superior
Pipe Wrenches
AND
MonkeyWrenches
FOR
SHOP, HOME and FARM
Trimo Wrenches for sale everywhere;
with Steel Frames that will not break;
Nut Guards that prevent accidental
turning of the nut in close quarters.
FOR 3ALC BY ALL DIALER*
fRIMONT MFG. CO.,101 *T
r?CTOfiT. ROXBURY, BOSTON, MASS.
ORDER
GittGERALE
CUTICURA
PREVENTS FALLING HAIR
If your scalp is irritated, and your
hair dry and falling out in handfuls,
try this treatment: Touch spots of
dandruff and itching with Cuticura
Ointment and follow with hot
shampoo of Cuticura Soap. Abso
lutely nothing better.
Pkaipt*luckPrxbrMtlJ Ailrw "CiH.iuUb
?r>WrtM.D?9*.llO.K*14?a tt.Mui " Sol-!
S'mp J* Olntmmt K an<1 Mr TalnimJ^.
girCuticura Sup ihtrti oiitxut mux.
BARKER'S
HIRSUTUS
FOR THE HAIR
IN USC ?0R OVER 7O YEARS"'
"Help Wanted"
and ,
"Employment Agency"
Advertisements for
A Better Job
Give Your
WANT" ADS.
a Chance!
Have them printed in the
NEW YORK HERALD
Phone Fitz Roy 6000.
LOOT OF EXPRESS
BAND ON DISPLAY
IN GEORGIA COURT
Hundreds of Articles Are
Brought In From Raids on
Defendants' Homes.
LOST, ONE DINNER BELL
Xejjro Tries to Rin^ Mess
Call on Lawn Mower,
Without Success.
NET IS DRAWN TIGHTER
Testimony of State's Star \Vit>
noss on Many Deals Is
Corroborated.
Special Despatch to Tub N<w Yofx Hicrald.
Macon, Oa., March 24.?For fifteen
minutes this morning, while Federal
court was taking- a rectws, deputies
from the United States Marshal's of
fice carried into the courtroom hun
dreds of pieces of stolen goods that
the American Railway Express Com
pany had recovered, in most cases
from the homes of the fifty-three de
fendants on trial on charges of con
spiracy to steal from the Govern
ment.
There was everything in the as
sortment from cigars to wearing ap
parel, automobile tlree, and even a
lawn mower.
In connection with the lawn mower
G. C. Carter, ail aged negro, told a
story that put the courtroom in an up
roar. The negro said he ordered, from
the Sears-Roebuck Company of Chi
cago a bell "what rings at dinner
time." He 'lowed they couldn't read
his writing, and sent him "this thing."
A \titness identified the lawn mower
as being the one that was recovered
from the home of E. K. Dunaway, agent
at Oglethorpe. one of the indicted men.
"Yes, suh, that's what that mail order
house sent me," said the negro. "I
thought it was a new kind of bell that
I hadn't never saw.
"I hung it up on a pole and worked
the handle up and down, but it wouldn't
ring. I took ft down on the ground and
rolled it. I turned It over and did every
thing that I could with it, but it Jest
wouldn't ring; no, auh, there ain't no
ring in it"
"Then I took It to the station and told
the agent that it wouldn't work," the
tw gro concluded, "and I told him to send
ft back and get me a bell that would
r'ng, but it never came.''
The Government showed that the lawn
mower was not returned to Chicago, but
was put off the train at Oglethorpe. H.
L. Bell of the Sears Roebuck Company
identified the lawn mower as having
teen shipped by his company.
II. C. Wilkerson, express messenger,
vho was not indicted, testified that he
purchased the ham referred to in
Hughes's testimony from W. E. Brunner
for $4. He said he did not know of any
other theft that had been committed.
The Government identified a number
of articles, including a bicycle that had
be*-n sold from express shipments. T.
A. Lovelace of Atlanta, to whom Hughes
said he and W. E. Brunner sold three
barrels of fish, took the stand.
Lovelace said that after he had gone
out of the fish business two men, one
small and the other big, came to him
and asked him to buy three barrels of
fish. He said he arranged the sale to
another party. He identified Hughes as
the small man. He could not Identify
Erunner positively
A check produced in court as having
I
I
I
been given [>v Lovelace in the transac- ]
tion bore the endorsement of Hrunnnr's
wife, whose signature was Identified |
by R. R. Allen of the Fourth National
Bank of .Macon.
Two automobile tiro? shipped by the
Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company's
Atlanta office to H. C. Perry of Shady
dale were returned. Perry stated, be
cause they were not the ones ordered.
J L. Richardson of the company ten-1
tlfied that the tires never reached At-:
lanta.
Sheriff W. 1C. Taylor of Cuthbert tes- j
tified concerning a gun that J. O. Hood |
had sold to E. C. Knight, and the gun |
was brought into court.
A stack of goods, including suits, win- i
do'.v curtains, bathrobes and other ar- j
tides, was brought in. He identified j
these as having born recovered from j
the home of Hood on a raid.
Wallace Miller cross-examined Sheriff
Taylor. The Sheriff admitted that he
did not know personally if any of the
goods were stolen.
"Is this all you got from Hood's
house?"
"No sir: we got an art square."
"Bring In thi? art square."
It was identified as the one seized.
Hardy Burke, conductor of the Cen
tral of Georgia Railroad, admitted that
he had purchased a gun from Charley
Hunter in February, 1020, but said he
had never heard of any crooked deal
ings between messengers and railroad
men.
BILL WOULD GIVE BACK
$10,000,000 TO SENDERS
Steamship Companies and
Bankers Put Under Control.
Special Despatch to Tnr New Yo*k Hicham/
New York HithIiI Bureau, I
Albany, .March 24. f |
More than 110,000,000. representing
several hundred thousand unremitted
accounts held by exprem and steamship
companies and private bankers lor
transmission to all parts of the world,
i will have to be returned to the con
signors If the bill iritroducrd to-day by
Senator Cotlllo becomes a law.
Provisions of the measure require that
nil persons and corporations engaged in
the business of transmitting money to
foreign countries must file a report of
all accounts wit'i the Superintendent of
Hanks on the first of each month. These
institutions are not regulated by the
State, and depositors clnim they ar; un
able to recover money not delivered.
The Cotlllo bill stipulates that the Su
| perlntendent of Banks shall determine
| such claims.
JURY SAMPLES LIQUOR;
ACQUITS HARRY BLACK
New Yorker in Florida Freed
in Criminal Court.
Miami. March 24.?Harry S. Black
of New York was acquitted by a Jury
in the Dade County Criminal Court
here this afternoon of having had a
large quantity of liquor In his posses
sion aboarn his private car at Cocoanut
Grove, five miles from Miami.
The jury returned the verdict in three
minutes. Ail members of the Jury were
ailower to drink from the seized stock
of whiskey by the prosecution in order
? that they might determine whether or
not it was intoxication.
In his defence .Mr. Black proved that
he was not aboard the private car at
the time the liquor was seized, and
said he had no knowledge of the whis
key being placed aboard it. He had
previously been acquitted of a similar
charge in Federal Court, but was fined
$.">00 In police court when he failed to
appear for a hearing.
( * N
Dies at 99, and Never
Had a Doctor's Bill
QALENA, 111., March 24.?
Henry Fleege, 99, died in his
home near here to-day. He had
lived there seventy-nine years.
He never had been ill a day in
his life and never had a doctor
bill. His good health slogan was
"early to bed and early to rise."
He is survived by twenty-two
grandchildren and fifty-two great
grandchildren,
v
DEBS, UNGUARDED, |
VISITS CAPITAL
Continued from Ftrat Page.
admirers aa being the soul of honor
and the Attorney-General was perfectly
willing to trust hie own statement tna
he would come to Washington ana re
turn to his cell unescorted. Mr. Daugh
-rty made it plain that he had not tno
least apprehension :ia t0 1>'B r,!jurn' .
The Debs case has been before tn s
public because of the demands lor
amnesty of political prisoners and ef
forts by his friends to obtain his re
leas.-. It was the most spectacular ea .
growing out of the war and efforts to
obtain Debs's release have been per
sistent. Samuel Gompers and o ner
American Federation of Labor offU'ials,
with a large delegation of Socialists,
had urjr. d his release as a result or
resolutions passed by the ex<-? f
council of the American federation or
Labor. , i _ _. j
Attorney-General Daugherty declared
the D^bs rase was an individual one
aii'l did not indicate a general pouo
with respect to all of the persons ar
rested under the Espionage act ior
criticism of the draft act or other war
time measures.
Appeals for Debs were based Ian,' iy
on the condition of his health. Attorney
General Daugherty said he :iPl)ear?
to be well, although apparently \ei>
nervous. Nervousness, he said, mign
be a natural condition with Debs.
( hanne of He?rt Dl*cu<t?ed.
A sit ad if Debs had indicated a chance
of heart with respect to Amertcan par
ticipation in the war, the Attorney
General said this naturally was one or
the things discussed, but that he cou i
not give the result of the discussion.
It was the policy of the Wilson A
ministration to treat political tiriforlP"
with consideration after the signing o
the armistice and many were not piac _
on trial. It was stated to-day, ho"0V*r;
that the new Administration s not ac
ceding to pressure for general *
but is bent on Justice for all of |"ose
accused of violation of the war laws.
Debs received a ten year sentence
and has served three years. Ho ao
dresfed a Socialist convention in un
ton. Ohio, on June 17 1918 in which he
attacked the conviction of Mrs. Rose
Pastor Stokes. Debs was quoted in the
speech as saying the Allies were seek
ing plunder In their conduct of the wnir
He was arrested ,or vl?laJt^" 2
Espionage act, arraigned July *? ?
and found guilty or, Kentember 13.fol
lowing ^ 'rial In which he declined to
offer a defence, admitting the
charges and saying he was willing to
, die in jail for his views. On September
4 he wis sentenced to ten years m
nrlsonment. He was admitted to fJO.OW
hnll. but Instructed bv the court that he
must go home and stay there andobe>
law He appealed to the United
States Supreme Court October 23. and
the hearing was fixed for the follow in,
J Meantime. Debs in a speech in Toledo
on November SO again attacked the con
duct of the war. This speech was In
vestigated by the Government The
United States Supreme Court on Mar1n
1911 sustained his conviction
1 viola*Ion of the Espionage act Dobs
left Terre Haute for prison in Cleveland
?ipril 3, 1919, but on June 12 of the same
vear he was transferred to the At
: ianta penitentiary, where he has bee4
ever since.
DEBS'S WARDEN WON'T
DISCUSS SECRET TRIP
Atlanta Prison Head Refuses
to Comment on Case.
Ati-anta, March 24.?The departure
from the Atlanta Federal penitentiary
yesterday of Eugene V. Debs wns
shrouded in secjecy The fa<-t that
Debs had left the prison was the sub
ject of rumor here last flight, but not
.-ven his local attorney, Samuel M.
Castleton, k?ew anything about it. ac
cording to his own statement, t red
Zerbst. warder, at the penitentiary,
avoided questioning by keeping his
whereabouts concealed and late to-day
when located for a few minutes declined
to discuss the matter.
"I'll not argue with the Attorney
General," was Zerbst's only comment,
when told Attorney-General Daugherty
had announced that Debs was in W ash
I isgton to-day.
The unprecedented trip alone and un
BUSINESS
THE STANDARD TYPE OF BUSINESS
JACKET PUT FORWARD BY FINCHLEY
FOR THE CURRENT SEASON /S OF A
RESERVED TYPE WHICH GATHERS
DISTINCTION FROM THE POISE ANP
NATURAL GRACE OF THE PERSON
WHO WEARS IT. AN INTERESTING
MODEL. EXECUTED IN PERFECT TASTE.
FIFTY DOLLARS
AND MORE
CUSTOM FINISH WITHOUT
THE ANNOYANCE OF A T/Y-ON
EE A DY? TO- PUT- Of
TAILORED AT FASHIOT PARK
mimmley
3V?it 46th.
NEW YORK
guarded to Washington, as announced
by the Attorney-General, was the first
time Debs had left the penitentiary
si?co he was sent here In 1918, and It
was presumed he went by a noon train
out of Atlanta Wednesday. His trip
to the station wa? understood to have
been -under guard of Department of
Justice agents. It Is understood this
was a precaution to prevent interview
ers from approaching the prisoner.
Debs was expected to return to At
lanta Friday afternoon and to resume
his prison duties In the hospital ward
of the penitentiary. He has been re
garded as a model prisoner, according
to a recent Htaternent of the worden,
and so far as known as been disciplined
only once. That was on the occasion
of his criticism of President Wilson just
before the latter retired from office.
Debs then whs refused permission to
see visitors or to receive mall for sev
eral weeks.
MURILLO MASTERPIECE
WILL GO TO KENTUCKY j
Mrs. Guthrie to Get Painting
She Won in Court.
Chicago, March 24.?Plans were made
to-day to transport "The Immaculate
Conception," a painting reputed to be
by the sixteenth century master Murlllo,
to the home of Mrs. Demla O. K. Guthrie
of Pnducaii, Ky., whose title to the pic
ture Wiii upheld yesterday by Judge
Wells M. Cook.
The painting was brought to Amer
ica from Spain ten years ago by Ben
jamin M:.nn of New York. Upon the
death of his wife It became the prop
erty of a daughter. Mrs. Emma Krings
of Youngstown, Ohio. It was turned
over to William T. McCandless of
Youngatown to be sold and he later
sued Mrs. Ki irigs for compensation.
\ :i Attorney who represented Mrs.
Krlngs kept the picture as his fee and
he was made the defendant in yester
day's Milt by Mrs. Guthrie, a daughter
of Mrs. Krlngs.
BEQUEST WILL STOP
IF MRS. YULEE WEDS
Will Goes to Probate in
Orange County.
SpfcHal Despatch to Tub New Yo*k Herald.
Middlbtown, N. Y, March 24.?The
will of Charles Wlckllffe Vulee of New
York and Tuxedo has been admitted to
probate In the Surrogate's Court of
Orange county. In the will, which was
executed In March, IS92, he bequeaths
the use of his property to his wife dur
ing her lifetime, and further provides,
"In the case of my wife marrying again
the trust is to be terminated and said
wife la to receive such dower or part of
my estate as she would be entitled to
In law as my widow. This provision in
cnse of my wife marrying a second tlm*
is not made with the view of preventing
her doing so, but only because I do not
think it ri^ht thnt property which name
to me from my father, the late David
Yuiee, should be held by those who
neither arc of his blood nor bear his
name."
Mr. Yulee died on February 16 at 6
East Sixty-first street at the age of 71.
He was a well known member of the
Tuxedo Park colony, a member of the
Knickerbocker Hub, the Tuxedo Club
and the Metropolitan Club of Washing
ton. He was sraduated from the t'nl
\erslty of Virginia in the class of 1872.
Mrs. Yulee wa- formerly Miss Anne P.
Murray of New York, a sister of J.
Archibald Murray and Mrs. William
Bayard Cutting.
TOWN AMIU LAXCE OUTLAWED.
Webster. Mass., March 24.?The Su
preme Court has handed down a deci
sion that the town of Webyter has no
authority to buy and maintain an am
bulance. and that for the last ten years
the town ha.- b^en conducting this de
partment Illegally. The decision, it is
said, not only affects Webster but every
other town in the State where an am
bulance is maintained by the town.
STETSON HATS
\NEW Spring Stetson carries with it the
distinction of being wdl hatted for Easter
morning and for the season to follow. We
have a wide variety of them in both our stores, in
stiff and soft hats, to choose from,
hfrcue Brosa DrumwonD
High Grade Hats ONLY
52 Broadway 1442 Broadway
Near Exchange PI. Bet. 40 & 41 8ts.
M
<- T'
\
atima
smokers
tell you
/
v, m
\ ? ?
?SjXv
:,b&i
?VHjS.. *j 137*7?,
>4s/fr the
Engineers
And the iron-workers
too! You'll be sur
prised how many of
them are loyal Fatima
boosters. Made ofthe
finest tobaccos?per
fectly blended.
FA1 IMA
yw"*J
else
lido
TWENTY for
25
Lior.rrr At Myrrh Tobacco Co.
'-but taste the
difference t

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