OCR Interpretation


The New York herald. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, April 01, 1921, Image 9

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045774/1921-04-01/ed-1/seq-9/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 9

Whatever you
prepare, it will be
more distinctively
good if you
"Sweeten it with Domino"
Grauiil.tted. Tablet, Povdtred,
Confectioners. Brown,
Golden Syrup.
DON'T SMOKE PAINT
Our plpee are made of the flceat Im
ported, well-seaeoned BRIAR ROOT We
use NEITHER PAINT NOR VARNISH,
leavlmr pores open to absorb moisture
They color like raeerachaums Absolutely
NO BREAKING IN Eaob pipe perfect
\nd guaranteed
M*il Order* Filled
PIPES REPAIRED PROMPTLY
BARCLAY PIPE SHOP
41 Barclay St^ Co* Church
LEITZ
BINOCULARS
An extraordinary opportunity to
Purohaso thla 165.00, 8-power Army
Officer's day and nlnht field Binocu
lars.
Regular Price $65
Special Offer
$2950
Complete with solid cowhide leather
case. The famous "LBITZ" binocular
(Brand New), of a quality that will
*tand microscopic Inspection. Con
structed with Independently focussing
eyepiece* ami Individual pupillary ad
justments make them suitable for anv
eyes. The Ideal glass for ItaoinK
Yaelitlnc and all outdoor lictlvltle
Will ship C. O. D. with privilege of
examination to any part of the U. ^
Tel. Cort. r,84a.
M. A. MODEM, * SONS.
191 Vulton St., npp. Hudson Tunnel*
*11 < ortliindt St. | .M NasMtu s(
(1 Church St. I 'ift I'lirk Row.
Mali Orders received at Pept. (J.
71 Cortland! St.. New York
Jfoyt's Service,Inc.
PLANNED
ADVERTISING
116 W?a 132 nd Street, AC YC
BOSTON CLEVELAND SPMINOPIEkD
Labor Leaders and Educators
Establish Centre of Learn
ing1 in Westchester.
THEY WEAR MOCCASINS
Bobbed Hair and Short Skirts
Supply the Usual Note of
Revolt Against Things.
[ In an upper room of a rambling frame
building: of Colonial design at the end of
; a winding dirt road about a mile and a
half out of the village of Katonah. West
chester county, a group of labor leader*
| and lesser known educators yesterday
j b.?KP.n plans for a new social order, the !
I objective of which, according to an- :
nouncement, Is tne substitution of edrira- 1
tlon for violence In radical movements. I
The utmost secrecy was maintained j
concerning the exact nature of the pro
ceedings and the Identity of those par- '
ticipating. The building in which the
conference Is being held Is known as
the Brookwood School and was founded
about two years ago by Dr. AVllllam M.
Fincke, formerly a Presbyterian clergy
man. He was pastor of the Greenwich
Fresbyterian Church, in West Thirteenth
street, but was forced to resign in May,
1917. after his congregation refused to
condone certain alleged pacifist utter
ttnees, including declarations that he
arms Pr&y f?r success of the allied
1 ester day when a reporter for The
a,w *0RK Herald attempted to get
some news of the result of the days pro
ceedings he was met with a polite but
2 m?'"811 0f any sort of in'orma
th , Wjlenl the reporter appeared at
the school a long haired youth in a worn
an whnm?^m scurr,ed "P?talrs. A worn
m'" ,the ^Ported later learned was
Mrs. Fincke and who wore an outing
costume with moccasins, appeared in
answer to the youth s summons She .2
nounced that she was charge of the
situation and demanded to know what
the inquisitive Intruder wanted
thaitlJMa WaS expl?Lined "he said
that there was no information to he
"bout tlw ?nS
-Sounds of typewriters clicking came
from an adjoining room and perhaps
thi f*MC?re ?fy?unK men and women.
the latter with bobbed hair and all
".?a.rl"g short skirts and moccasins or
sandals, peered inquisitively from door
ways opening Into the hall.
Among those who were to participate
In the meeting were John Fltzpatrlck.
president of the Chicago Federation of
mfn? i ,Was cha'rman of the
national committee for organizing iron
and steel workers which conducted the
steel strike; William Z. Foster, leader
of the 1919 steel strike; James Maurer,
pies.dent of the Pennsylvania State
federation of Labor; Jay G. Brown of
Seattle, president of the International
Timber Workers; A. J. Muste, execu
tive secretary of the Amalgamated Tex
tile Workers; Joseph Schlossberg;, sec
retary of the Amalgamated Clothing
Workers; John Brophy of the United
Mine Workers and Edward Xockles,
.secretary of the Chicago Federation of 1
Labor.
As far as could be learned no known j
member of the American Federation of
Labor was at the conference, nor was I
this body represented. This fact was!
brought to the attention of H. T. Brough
am. one ot the conferees, who seemed
to be handling what publicity was in
dulged In. but he refused to comment on
this phase of the situation, although he
Insisted that the movement involves the
founding of a new school to be sunport-d i
by organized labor. The plans, he said 1
are based on four fundamental tenets:!
"First, that a new social order Is
needed and Is comlng?ln fact, that is I
already on the way.
"Second, that education will not only
LUMBER PUT ON FREE LIST
IN NEW HOUSE TARIFF BILL
Only Exception* Are Wood Products From Canada?
Decision Remove* Menace of High Canadian
Export Duty on Wood pulp.
iHtpmir* tm Thi N*? *<mm Mas***.
Hf? la)k HmM hWM
WMMafka, l? I . ?? II U )
An mhwhiiii la put lumWr with a
few fxrr^dww. on iv frw lust M tlto
n* wtariff tail! vhKli tk* llwtM XVty%
and IImiiu Cmmhhm Is vriihi
was r<M?< h?-d Uh <tey by mm ?t Ik* awfe
commltim.
The lumber Mftwn ?f tk* imn* Mil
will be similar to that af the I'tva*
Aldrloh Ml K' ^rn?fita'l>? FuH'u'r.
Mk>klinui I'katrmaa of Uw c?<* i t >
Mid. The u'^tlon> tvrmt fh? fte? li*<
den) In general with import*' u%nm ?f
lumK' from 1'anada, ?hmh Iim Mmi*r
tart'* on the Impurtatio* vt Art ft ?n
lumtx r. These piare dull* o*t
nnd oth> r *ood product* whu .. ? ame
into competition with fruja* mtut* n ir?e
American mills.
Representative* of tha lumber tn4 --jr
In general reoommewd u> the *??? arid
M?an? Committee tk.at lumber, * *i
mrnti except ton*, be hept 0*1 she fre? ??
hasten Its coming. but will re<lm-e 10 a
minimum and perhaps do away enttrr)
wlUi a resort to violent m?rtht>da
"Third, that the workers are the one*
who will usher In this new order
"Fourth, that there la Immediate Med
for a workers' colleges with a breast cur
rlculum, located amidst healthy c ountry
surroundings where the students can
completely apply themselvas to the task
In hand."
U. S. AGENTS AND THUGS
CALLED TO TENNESSEE
Will Testify in Theft of Gov*
ernment Platinum.
Thirty special agents of the Depart
ment of Justice were sent from the New
York office last night to Nashville,
Tenn., to attend the trial of H. B
Crone, former Government chemist at
the Old Hickory Powder riant; Hubert
B. Carter, former traffic manager of the
plant, and Abe Roth and Flo Weller on
charges of having conspired to rob the
Government of fSOO.OOO worth of plati
num.
It was said that perhaps a srore of
New York gunmen have been called to
testify in the case, some for the Govern
ment and some for the defendants.
During the war 12,000,000 worth of
platinum at the plant was sprayed on
epsom salts and converted into a fortn
ready for the making of sulphuric acid.
When the armistice was signed the Gov
ernment changed it back to sponge form
and $800,000 worth was missing, the
bottles being filled with mud and nico
tine.
BOOTLEGGERS' BULLETS
LAME WELCH FOR LIFE
Grape Juice Man's Son Still
Suffers From Wounds.
Kjierial Dmpatch to Tub Nsw York Herald.
Buffalo, March 31.?William Welch,
a deputy sheriff of Chautauqua county
and son of the president of a grape
juice company, probably will be lame
for the rest of his life from the cffects
of the Ave bullet wounds which he re
ceived Tuesday night In a chase after
automobile bandits and bootleggers
through th? country roads near West
field.
Physicians believed at first that none
of the wounds would be troublesome, but
the one through the fle-shy part of
Welch's hip has taken a serious turn
and is causing some worry. Probing
has failed to locate the bullet. Welch
continues to suffer considerable pain.
?n*np*r?tlvei|y mtl? la ImportMl
??<#*? front ? 'infU, where production
e??a mtmmml ?lum-i thorn In IhLa country.
ifmm of the rewaoit* for not placing
i#t? 4?tW? on any lumber Import* ?t<
W UM ? a . tdlan a.tuatlor regarding
print f*P?r Canada to III a position, It
m rMllKd |? nnr,a?-? American print
)ia??r W'to ky ih?< iit| a high expert
da** M wood pulp aa a r*lall?tor)' mea*
M* far a klfli tariff ?m product* which
ah* Kiallv artta in th* fritted Mt.ite*
Tin lumtor tariff* thu* far ncrvmt on
**? *?y a Nlk?mfnittM rum
pa?J *f Mr fonlitey and Kapreaenta
t|v?? Ua?*tarmi-fc (N J I ami Watson
i Pa.I. This *ybi ommltt** alao ha*
charge ef wi?l ahvljair*. hut *fter
ha vine ?r**"! "tall rwnt a pound duty
or a>o.>l Mi th* fr*a?* H ha a discontin
ued *orli mi oOmt wool dutle* te m
pormrtty pending receipt of mor? Infor
mactoa The avkrommltt** ha* aaked
representative*# of the wool i*rp?t in
due* ry to auhmtt ?or? data regarding
tMa iwdua'ry
INSISTS ON JURIES
FOR LIQUOR TRIALS
Anderson Hits at Bant on,
Who Wants Dry Bill Changed
William Tf AnMtraan, Stat* Sjperln
' t'ndaai at tha Antt-Oaloon L*ague.
a itatmor.t lut night atUrklnf
A i?tant DteqrVt Attorney Mb M.
fc*r.ton. who na* advocated an amend*
mi tt to th* Htat* prohibition enforce
me -it mea*urea m a* to facilitate the
ha:?!i ng of liquor case* In the local
courta
On Wednesday Mr. Anderson criticised
the Ulstrict Attorney* office for In
activity la regard to liquor violation*
durt: * th* laat year and aaaerted that
an amentment ?*? advocated only a*
an ev?f ?n. To thla Mr Banton replied
ancusli.g Mr. Anderaon of being ignorant
of the !.!?'(? and court procedure.
Under the propose*! law Magistrate*
would t.Avr the power to l*au<- warrant*
and hold accuaed person* In b?ll for the
Grand Jury. If indicted the al>g**d of-j
ftnder* woiid be tried In the Court of
Central s ??k>n* by a jury. Mr. llanton
and Mm' other local law office!* want
tlov. Mliler to have the Mullan-Gage
i enforcement bill amended so a* to have
the caae* tried In the Court of Special
Sessions whereby no Julie* are required.
DECLINE IN INSANITY
TRACED TO DRY LAW
Hospital Commission Reports
Shortage of Help.
Albany, March II.??> ?%luctlon of
new caae* of Insanit^-^i New York
Btnte for 1?20 wa? d l^jrlnclpally to
tho decline In case# of alcoholic Insan
ity, the State Ho?pltal Commla*lon made j
known in It* annual report aubrnltted
to the Legislature to-day.
Klrst admissions to hospitals in 1117
wan at the rate of 69 per 100.000 State
resident*, while In 1&20 the rate fell to
6J.3. In t S? 17 there were St4 flrat ad
missions diagnosed a* case* due to alco
holism, and in 1920 there were only 122
case* in thla group
A shortage of physician*, ft irses ami
r.tiendants wa* shown by the 'eport. At
the end of the fiscal year there were
sixty-seven vacanclea on the medical
staffs of the State hospitals and 1.2(11
vacanclea of nurse* and attendants.
LO( KWOOI) Jl RY DIIMI??KD.
Judge John C. Knox In the federal
District Court dismissed yesterday the
special Grand Jury which considered
the evidence taken before the lx>ck
wood committee In Its housing and
building material inquiry.
More Advertising
Than Last Year
f"\ESPITE the record volume of advertising car
-?-^ried by The Herald last year, for the month of
March this year
THE NEW YORK HERALD
GAINED 41,014 Lines of Advertising
compared with March, 1920. The Herald is the
only New York morning newspaper showing a gain
in advertising lineage over last year.
When The Herald is on YOUR schedule you will
do a larger business.
THE NEW YORK HERALD
BAKER SCORED FOR
PLIGHT OF DISABLED
American Legion Commander
Says Former Secretary of
War Whs Heartless.
MEETING AT TOWN HALL
Weeks's Assistant Promises to
Stimulate Process of Care
of Injured.
Col. F. W. Galbralth. Jr., commander
of 11<? American Legion, used blunt
language to denounce former Secretary
of War H&kt-r for "heartless" treatment
t disabled service men In his address
at a maM meeting in Town Hall last
night The meeting was held under the
. indoss of the National Security League
t protest the treatment which disabled
? ..Hers and sailors huve received from
?; . . rnnv-nt bureaus charged with their
' ir.- and rehabilitation.
Sp?tldO( after J. Mayhew Wain
?r Igl AwtllUUtt Sec relay of War, had
. :\tri a pledge to "stimulate the pro
of Goverrvient" in bo far as he
ild. Col. Galbrnlth commended the
project of thin proffered aid and said:
"I am thoroughly Satisfied that he has
expres s d In :i considerate and careful
??y the ? xact sentiment of the Secre
tary of War. It was an outrageous,
damnable thing that the disabled men
have suffered at the hands of the former
ri?'-r?tary <>f War. And I come from
1 'h!<>! Why the heartlessness I don't
know. when there were camps with base
hospitals, doors locked and guards
p> if ted outside, It was contrary
to the policy of the War Department.
"Thank God for the few Intelligent,
promising statements from you, sir," he
added, turning to A.*~t?tant Secretary
Walnwrlght
"There are 27,000 disabled men In
h -spltals of the country to-night. Fifty
four per cent are In Government owned
or leased hospitals, while the other 46
I er cent are 'farmed out' In 1,200 prl
\ ,t? hospitals, and no man knows what
his i*osltion Is."
Mis. C'orinne Roosevelt Robinson read
. personal letter from President Har
<nn? whlh a-as a reply to the communi
cation submitted by Mrs. Arthur L. L,lv
??rmore and herself \s women representa
tives of the Republican National Com
mittee, in which the President reiterated
the announcement he made in Washlng
tt n that every consideration would be
?hown the soldiers.
Resolutions rebuking delay and call
ing upon i 'ongrees to give preference to
the rehabilitation measures sponsored by
the Amerl' an legion were presented by
Louis W. Htotesbury, former State Ad
Jutnnt-General, and unanimously car
ried.
WARMEST MARCH SINCE 1790.
Philadelphia Heriird of at Least
? AO Tears Hratea.
PHIUMLTK1A, March 31.?Philadel
phia experienced the warmest March
it has had for at k-ast ISO years. Rec
ords date back to 1790, and show noth
ing to compare with It. The dally mean
average for the month has been 54 de
grees. The next warmest March on rec
ord was in lfoj, when theie was an
average of 49.4.
NEGROES KILLED BY TORNADO
Albany, Ga.. March 31.?Three ne
groe.* were killed and three Injure'I in
a tornado which struck the northwestern
part of Albany this afternoon.
Among the buildings wrecked by the
storm were the plant of the Virginia
Carolina Chemical Company, the Albany
Box Factory and the grand stand at the
ball park.
BELIEF CAMPAIGN INDORSED.
Senator Lodire and Ei-(ii)t. McCnl*
Srnd Approval.
i Indorsements of the campa gn of :h? <4
I American Committee for Relief In Ire
land were made public from the com- ' o!
IttM hckiqutrt'n tram
fltat*a ?rn*l?r at>4 Kan
McOalL former Governor > f Hun
laetta. T')? ConnwUful mtbr Mpfl-*ns
w amount to aHhougt th?
iota w?? nly flO'",##?.
M>'uur ,ippr< clattra of the effort*
American* to lend ai<1 w?* reo?.\*<i
fr m Jam?e a. txiuirlaa, a Dublin
<V ' who was one of the orranliera
' the |ri?h '.Vhlt* Oroea. "I have had
,ti* i #? ?(#** rg smm-n of people
?j *#n fro-t) home* th?!r home* burned
? r I ??# loet," he wrote. "Aa la
?f <ai In war uf all kinda. the innocent
?uffer moat."
cThe modern
Damascus
blade
rrp
"\TOUR dealer knows that the best Damascus steel
*"? ever made is now excelled by the marvelous
steel of the Durham-Duplex detachable blades.
He will tell you that Durham-Duplex blades are
made from the finest Swedish steel?oil-tempered,
hollow-ground and sharpened to a perfect shaving
edge. That's why no razor on earth gives you such
a cool, clean, comfortable shave as the
GEHETE GEE*
Safe tf&azor
Moreover, the guarded edge is your protection
against cutting. And because Durham-Duplex blades
have two extra long shaving edges they double
your shaving mileage. Easy on your pocket book as
well as your face.
Standard Set One Dollar Complete,
Including Three Double-edged Blades
Additional Blades 50c for a package of 5
DURHAM-DUPLEX RAZOR CO.
Jersey City, New Jersey
Factories
Jersey City, U.S.A. Sheffield, Eng.
Paris, France Toronto, Can.
Sales Representatives in mil Countriem
(2.
Emblrm nfSatisfaction
<T
BUICK
3
Emblem ofSatisfaction
Seven trainloads of Buicks, over a thousand automo
biles in excess of our regular New York allotment,
will leave the factory between now and April 9th to
take care of our Metropolitan customers.
THE STORY OF BUICK'S GREAT SUCCESS
The reason why we have for years built and sold more Six
Cylinder Automobiles than all other well-known makers of
Sixes combined is all told in the Buick Chassis we are exhibiting
on our Salesroom Floor at Broadway and 55th Street.
It it the simplest, cleanest and freest from multiplicity of parts of any motor
car chassis in the world. We believe it is the only medium price chassis with
frame and all other parts strong enough to properly carry closed car bodies,
such at Sedans. Broughams. Limousines and Coupes.
We invite car owners, prospective owners and all who arc interested in fine
workmanship to inspect this masterpiece.
SPECIAL CLOSED CARS
We have four special Limousines for immediate delivery and
one special Brougham ready and two that will be ready in
ten days.
The Metropolitan Buick Branches Have Broken
All January, Ftbruary and March Sales Records.
A BUICK HOLDS THE WORLD'S GREATEST MILEAGE RECORD, 272,000 MILES
World's Largest Builders of Six-Cylinder Automobiles
BUICK MOTOR COMPANY
BROOKLYN
316 Livingston St.
NEW YORK
Broadway A. 55th St.
Factory Flint, Michigan
NEWARK.
497 Broa d St.
~q)
WHEN BETTER AUTOMOBILES AM; BUII.T, BUICK WILL BUILD THEM

xml | txt