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The New York herald. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, May 10, 1921, Image 11

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BUENOS AIRES PORT
CLOSED BY STRIKE
Workers Demand Guarantee
That Non-Union Men Will
Not Be Used.
T\ K. CONSUL INVOLVED
Denies. However, Refusal to
Aid Chileans Led to Pres
ent Trouble.
Bp the Associated Press.
BtjBNOB Aires, May 9.?Port workers
of Buenos Aires struck to-day, (*oin
plctely tying up the port. They notlfle
the Government they would not return
to work until assurances had been given
that the non-union labor which tie
T.abor Protective Association of Employ
ers had announced It intended using to
carry on the port operations would not
be permitted to work.
The Labor Protective Association Sus
pended action upon Its decision to send
non-union laborers into the port zone at
the urgent request of the Government.
The wa^r front is being strongly
guarded by the police.
The Government strongly disappro\es
of the decision of the association, said
an editorial published by the Epoca. the
Government organ. The newspaper d.d
not.reveal what the Governments atti
tude toward the protection of free labor
would be In case the association followed
out Its Plan. +he aasociaUon was
charged by the "^spa^r asJhre^en
ing -suddenly tfl provoke a new soclal
conflict, the outcome of which would
difficult to calculate."
Consul-General Explains.
William H. Robertson, the
Consul-General here, commenting on de
spatches received in Buenos Aires o
Washington to the effect hts refuRfl'
aid five Chilean members of the crew or
the American steamship Martha
Ington to return to their country was the
cause of the port workers- boycott of tho
Martha Washington, which hsf led up
to the present tleup of the port, declared
the statements were based on a miscon
ception of facts.
Mr. Robertson said the boycott began
when the Munson Line refused to accede
to the demands of the port workers
union that the firemen of the Martha
Washington be paid off. discharged and
repatriated because of alleged ill treat
ment. He added that after the Munson
Line, charterers of the steamer, and the
] yyeal Shipping Board authorities re
ferred the demands of the union to the
consulate he refused to receive the dele
gates of the union who called on him to
press their demands, and the boycott
continued. ^
The Consul General added he ha?
been ready to listen to any complaints
or grounds for discharge presented by
the firemen themselves as provided for
by maritine laws, but that the fire
men had refused to make any com
plaints before him or to accept Investi
gation bv the consulate. On the other
hand, they had sought Intervention by
a foreign labor union with which, under
American law, he had no authority to
deal.
Had Maintained Position.
Throughout his conferences with the
Argentine Government officials Mr. Rob
ertson said he had consistently main
tained this position, and that any see
ing refusal on his part to aid the Chil
eans. or any other members of the crew,
was consequent on their refusal to make
complaints before the Consul, and be
cause of the attempt made to force the
consulate to deal with the union.
To-day's events are the outcome or
the long standing difficulties between
Argentina and foreign commercial, in
dustrial and steamship Interests on the
one hand and union port labor, which
is under control of the Government, on
the other. These commercial, industrial
and steamship interests have complained
continuously to the Government of the
unbearable Imposition* and abuses
w hich they declare port labor has com
pelled them to accept in connection
w ith the loading and unloading of ships
and the transportation of commodities
to places of business.
The boycott of the Munson Line
steamship Martha Washington, they
?iv, is only one example of the numer
ous difficulties with the port workers
which have resulted in restricting com
merce at the port of Buenos Aires.
URGES DEVELOPMENT
OF ALASKA'S RESOURCES
Engineer Warns White Set'
tiers Will Quit Country.
Washington, May 9.?Unless develop
ment of Alaska Is stimulated depopula
tion will reduce Its inhabitants to Eski
mos and Indians only, J. L. McFhereon,
a civil engineer, who spent twenty-three
years in the territory, declared to-day
before the House Territories Committee.
He urged passage of Chairman Curry's
bill to create a board of five members to
administer the affairs of the territory.
Despite Its wealth In natural re
sources, Mr. MoPherson said, the popu
lation of Alaska Is less than In 1910
and at that time It was less than In
1900. He contended It was Impossible to
administer Alaskan affairs from Wash
ington, and said It was virtually impos
sible for white settlers to get possession
of Alaska lands or resources without
consulting one or a doren of the thirty
two different conflicting and overlap
ping Federal bureaus.
WOULD COIN PKACB DOLLARS.
Washington, May 9.?Coinage of
"peace" dollars of an appropriate de
sign to commemorate the termination of
the war Is proposed In a bill Introduced
to-day by Chairman Vestal of the House
Cvthage Committee.
Deer in Palisades Woods
Leaps to Death on Beach
FULL grown deer, running
at top speed through the
woods on the Palisades, near Al
pine, early yesterday, crashed
through the guard rail at the top
of the cliff and was' dashed to
death on the beach far below.
The animal's fall waa wit
nessed bv Sergeant William
Whitley of the Interstate Park
police. He said the deer ap
parently had been frightened
and lost its sense of direction.
V /
WINTER WHEAT TO
YIELD LARGER CROP
Government Estimate Is 629,
287,000 Bushels? Rye
Harvest Up.
Washington, May 9.?This years
winter wheat and rye crops will be |
larger than those of last year and the !
hay crop will be about the same as that
of a year ago, the Department of Agri
culture's May forecasts issued to-day In
dicate. Winter wheat acreage showed
much less than average abandonment as
a result of favorable weather during the
winter and a crop of 629.2S7.000 bushels,
or 8,000,000 more than forecast a month
ago, is estimated on the acreage figures
of the May 1 canvass.
Kansas reported an abandonment of 8
per cent., which was the heaviest of any
of the important producing States, and
her crop promises this year to be about
1,000,000 bushels less than that of last
year. Abandonment .'n Ohio, Indiana.
Illinois, Missouri and Nebraska ranged
from 2 to 3 per cent. The 'crop In Ohio
Is forecast at about 13,000.000 bushels
more than that of last year, and In In
diana, Illinois and Missouri It will be
about 10,000,000 more than the 1920
crop. Nebraska's crop will be about
1,300,000 bushels smaller, and Okla
homa's about 10,000,000 less than those
of last year.
The acreage remaining to be harvest
ed, the May 1 condition and the forecast
nt production of winter wheat for the
principal growing States are:
Acres. P. C. Bushels.
Pennsylvania ... 1,447.000 95 27,788,000
Ohio 2.208,000 01 41,190.000
Indiana J.804.0O0 00 32,800.000
Illinois 2.413.000 04 46,0.-i2.000
Texas 1,701,000 72 21,428,000
Missouri 2,784,000 91 42.2ISO.OOO
Nebraska 3.238.000 02 88,848,000
Kansas 9,516.000 84 133,888.000
Oklahoma 2.976.000 84 37,408,000
Washington 1.083,000 00 20,647,000
CHARGES BY HAYTIANS
DENOUNCED AS 'ROT'
Denby Saya He Welcomes an
Investigation.
Washington, May 9.?Characterizing
as "rot" charges made by three Haytian
delegates in a memorial to the White
House, State Department and Congress,
protesting against American occupation
of Haytl, Secretary Denby declared to
day the Navy Department welcomed any
Investigation that Congress might care
to make of conditions in that republic.
"It Is the same old rot," Mr. Denby
declared, "and 1 am sick of having this
thing recur, be disproved and recur
again."
The memorial demanded the with
drawal of United States military forces
from that republic and charged a long
series of atrocities by American marines
and tbe native gendarmerie In Haytl.
50 DESTROYERS COMING HERE.
Will Lmtc <jhni-lee<on, 9. C.. To
day for Summer ((garteri.
Charleston, S. C., May 9 Rear Ad
miral A. H. Robertson, commanding the
Atlantic destroyer force, on his flagship,
the Rochester, will lead out of this har
bor to-morrow a flotilla of fifty destroy
ers, en route to New York and Newport.
The craft wintered in these waters but
will pass the summer at Newport.
ESTATES APPRAISED.
JANE M. MAXWELL (November 4, 1920).
Leaving an estate of (124,234. Relatives,
friends, nieces and nephews receive be
quists of (0,000 each, as follows: John M.
Woods. Ran Dlago, Cal.; Arthur W. B.
Wood, Garden City, L. I.; Maude M. H.
Wood, Ran Diego; Charles H. R. Maxwell,
Cambridge, Mass.. George L. Maxwell,
Cambridge, Mitt Cousin, Allfhea Mc
Dowell, Baltimore, reoelvtvs ((1,000. Frlende,
Ellon March. 307 West Ninety-third street,
(.1,000; Uettie Ellis, 314 West 138th street.
(10,000.
FELLOWBR DAVIS (September S. 1920).
Leaving an estate of (200,493. Bona and
daughter*. Fellowes Davie, 430 Park ave
nue; Plerpont Davis. Greenwich, Conn.,
and Dudley Davie, 993 Park avenue, re
ceive (40,892 each; Merle A. D. Johneou,
67 W?t Forty-eight street, the home and
content* there and (64,121. Friend, Phillip
P. Getty. Cedar place, Yonkera, (5,000.
LOUIS C. BE88QN (February 29. 1920).
leaving an estate of (83.311. Wife, Jose
phlne Naglc Beaeon. 74<) West End avenue,
receives (14,331 ; slater, Lucy C. Bwseon,
Albany, ('.a,, (12.075; mcther, Barbara
Beseon, Raleigh, N. C.. (8,050.
ISAAC WISTAR KENDALL (March 1, 1910).
Leaving an estate of 1145.103. Mother,
Lydla Wletar Kendall, 12(1 Weet Seventy
nlnth street, has a life interest In (140.103.
Alpha Delta Phi Society receives (5.000.
OUBTAV IIARCH (February 13, 1019). leav
ing an estate of (197^885 Wife, Sarah H.
Rasch. 48 East Eighty-third street, has a
life Interest In (179.785. Five Institutions
receive from (200 to (500 each.
RUSSELL W. MOORS (July 81. 1020). Leav
ing an estate of (133,498. Sisters, Lucille
H. L. Moore, Atlantic City, N. J., receives
(2.000 cash and annuity of (1,000: Jennie
Moore. South Orange, N. J., (4.000 cash
and annuity of (1,000. Friend, Otto F.
Amend. 38 West Eighty-first street, (5.000.
Princeton University receives the rnsldue,
amounting to (85,489.
ELIZABETH O. HANT8CHE (April 27,
1919). leaving an estate of (47.980. Hus
band, F.mll O. Hantsdie, 140 East Forty
third street, receives (22.4(13. Sons, Albert
E. and Earnest P. Hantsche, 4061 Park
avenue and Elmhurnt. L. I., receive $11,381
each. f
GRACE RTANNARD LEWIS (November 21.
1920). Leaving an estate of $70,804. Hus
band, Robert P. Lewis, 117 West Bsventjr
nlnlh street, receives $00,804. Children,
Robert S. and Kathleen G. Lewis, receive
$5,000 each.
HINDLEY'S
Established 1892
House Mechanics of All Kinds
HARDWARE
? ? #
ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES
Distributors for
DE VOE
PAINTS, VARNISHES, STAINS, ENAMELS AND BRUSHES.
Thos. Hindley & Son, Inc.
CBAS. T. HINOfJCT, PrM.
81? SIXTH AVENUE Bryant.
Near 49th Street $297
WARTIME CONTROL
OVER DYES IS URGED
Knox Declares, Industry Will
Become Important Agency
in National Defence.
GERMANY AN EXAMPLE
Senator Answers Attack of
Moses on Amendment to
Emergency Bill.
Special Despatch to The New Voi* Humid
New York Herald Bureau. |
Wwshlnrton. I>. C.. May ?. I
The importance of maintaining the
American dye industry and extending
the wartime control over it In the new
emergency tariff bill was emphasized
to-day by Senator Knox (Pa.) In a
speech answering an attack on the dye
amendment by Senator Moses (N. H.).
The New Hampshire Senator, who
last Congress voted against the
emergency tariff bill, announced his in
tention of opposing it again, basing ins
opposition largely on the proposal to
protect the dye industry. He charged
that American dye monopolies were
maintaining a targe lobby here, that the
Finance Committee had vitiated the
principle of the emergency tariff bill
designed to protect agriculture by adding
the dye amendment, and said it was
"cluss legislation of the most vicious
and dangerous kind."
Senator Knox said the economic
features of the dye amendment which
he had advocated before the Flnancr
Committee and is now supporting were
not nearly so important as the feature
of developing an important agency of
national defence. He showed that Ger
many had recognized the value of her
dye plants because they could be con
verted instantly Into munitions plants,
and that she. is now engaged In the same
course which will make her able to
mobilize for defence or attack In case
of future war. America, he insisted, can
do no less.
He called attention to the use of
chemical warfare by Germany, which, he
said, was due to her great command
over the dye manufacture.
"Germany's dyestuff industry," he
continued, "is now being conducted on a
greater scale than ever, and its future
prosperity and development depends upon
her ability to sell her product to other
countries. She is able to undersell America
and can drive our industry out of busi
ness unless she is prevented and thus
blot out the principal means this country
has of meeting a foe in a chemical war.
"You can sink the German battleships
to the depUis of the sea; you can blow
the great Krupp plant into hades and
cast the big Berthas Into ploughshares
and pruning knives, but if you leave the
dyestuffs In the hands of Germany she
will still have the world by the throat.
"How can we refuse to take over for
ourselves this great advantage in na
tional security? I call your attention to
tho fact that in 1914, the beginning of
the world war, there were but seven dye
plants of any size in the United States.
Now there are about 180. Yet, we hear
them referred to as monopolies.
"The dye Industry in this country will
become greater and greater and more
efficient, not only for peace purposes, but
for purposes of war."
WANTS CITY PLANNERS
TO CONSIDER AIRSHIPS
Mutt Look Long Ahead Alto
on Trantit for Workert.
Pittsburgh, May 9.?City planners
should be able to forecast at least twen
ty-live years to provide for changes the
airship will make In commerce, said John
Ihlder, manager of the Civic Develop
ment Department of the United States
Chamber of Commerce, addressing the
thirtieth National Conference on City
Planning here to-day.
"We are so young that all of the de
fects in our civic planning have not1
cropped out," he eatd.
Mr. Ihlder declared that successful city
planning depends upon adequate means
for transporting quickly and cheaply the
metropolitan worker who resides In the
suburbs and the zoning of a city whereby
workers will reside near the places of
their employment.
U. S. LOSS ON R. R. S
IS 51,200,000,000
Amount l? 9SO0.000.mMI More
Than Wat Intimated by For
mer Direetor tAearral.
NEW CLAIMS LOOMItti I P
IHffawiM Aria# Oi*r I.la
bility of tio\rmm#nt for Main
tenanee Ibiring War Period.
Mtjr ? -M'U to tit*
Oovernmert tn oparwtton -t t) rt'lrn '?
under P"b4era! control wt!1 ha atom it
$1,*00,004,000, or S300 OOM.Oo* nv?r*
than estimated by furmtr Do ? ???*<>?--*, ;?-*i
eral Mines, according to an to
day 6y Director-*}*n-rai Darts
Mr. Mine* estimated the o*? ? .>4 m
$900,478,764. Mr Davis *a 1 CI* m* ? t
considered by Mr. II;?.< a hax? *rl**n to
added. and the underestimate ??* mxli
in the allowance for mainteuam ? t ? ?
losses, additions and betterment* rn?d.
solely for war purjiose* and "the ?
counts.
Differences between tne Sdrn n *
lion and the, carrier# as ;o tn* i *
c-f the Government for under
nance during Ft ieral control, amount
Ing to several hund- ? iil .'-.ti .to; a
may be carried to ttie Supreme t'< ?
for final adjustment, the r<po : - . .
It was estimated that w.,<n ?? I ? te h
i'ers have filed their under malntcnn- ???
'.?laims they will aggregate between |
$700,000,000 and ISOO.OOU.onO
The report showed that the ran -#
administration hnd assets attgregatli*
$430,930,138.08, < onsistlng of negotiable
obligations of the carriers, such as cqu p
ment trust obligations, and notes
bonds taken by the admtnlstrat'on dor
Ing Federal control.
The delay In aettling claims h?* b-e?
caused chiefly by th? slowness of ' ?
toads in filing their claims, th. re;.
said, lidding that practical! no > I'm
had been filed In 1920. I'p to tin p?- ?
ent time 14 of the 65 roads taken ex.
have filed their claims, representing 5*
per cent, of the entire mileage, exchni
ing short lines.
"X have no desire to exaggerai?* i!.<
importance of the complexities of m.xli
ing this final settlement," the Director
General said In his report "It Is un
doubtcdly the greatest adjustment be
tween one tenant and over 600 landlord
that ever occurred. The property was
operated under the abnormal condition#
of a world war. The demand for labor
and materials In all Industrial enter
prises was greatly in excess of the *up
pdy. In the effort to combine this stu
pendous aggregate of independent lines
into a single and coordinating con. ern
much of the operating property of tinj
individual carriers was Inextricably In
termingled."
President Wilson stated at the tlim
the roads were taken over that hi
would "recommend to Congress the pas
sage of a law providing that the railway
properties be maintained In subslunt -
* ? ? ? *?"> ?d repair ?? when taken over."
?? 'i ?? inn '> thla r'commendAUon,
< 'vngrrma ppa I d-d that a atandard con
tr? . ?? ? idi a claUM. It
ta th* mf11 n nv* of opinion ovar th* con
?tru?-t?. , of !h* rulea In thla provlalon
f tha *of??i?<t 'hat h*a cauaed tha roa
harltv of th* r< *tn>v*r?l#a between th*
earriera and th* adm.iilstratlon. the re- j
port aaM.
f *t i-*ttl*m*nt prt?*nta paculiar 1
!if' rw-*a th* report raid. many of,
th*ni it- r * vrtew practical qu*allona"
arfctefc laralvi mart tnaa mrr# niattera
a# i< 4 u .n? ?r?ar
DOG WAS A SUICIDE,
DEFENCE OF MOTORIST
Owner, Suing, Saye Animal
Ueed Due Care.'
Iv ?rr..' Ma ? To th* i (ni*ntion of
J<>ha t*hak? a. tn a autt for II.MO dan.
*?-? that hla 'lop waa a np due car*
whan kltlad an tha atra*t by an automo
bile drives by i*? *t ,! r> nahua. th*
iatt*r an?wared to i* Superior Court
t lay that th* iniMi ( -i milled aul
*kl?
Tha court thu* ha# two unuaua! qu*?
i ok to d**tdr Whether a ?i >* may b*
?aid to ha * ue* t dee *r. ami whether
a .1 ? met b? ? ontt.dered lo have ended
,t# '* tr>t*n* .r al.' t a
Mr Donahi.. ? ho a an attorney, in
hla anawer aaid "tha d a ??? . ro>alnt
tha ?traet la front r th* defendant ? au
tomohlia II* ? oidonly turned and ra- 1
reived to a etrcl*. -tat.!.in* and bit in*
at other nnhnai* H- ? wni i*?pond*nt
at hla taabWtty H> ita to da* ?ald anlmala
h# hurled htmeelf under th* d?f*ndant"a
a ut nahWa and thereby committed aul
?id* "
SEX BAR IS REMOVED
BY HICK SITE FRIENDS
Vote Joint Mooting Firat Time
in Two Conturioa.
I'MILAtHCl !-'< 14. *ta> * Both Ibr mcilj
? rul women at U* Philadelphia yearly I
meeting: of HivMt* BYlenrta voted -o-da*
u> ni.. ! in )olnt i??>#i .1. to-morrow.
? -eking a ruetom maintain*-)! for mart
than too cwnturV-e
v li< >rh there had boea no formal
agre-ment, vote OA the m*rfbi| of tki
two aaaatona waa taken ?t tha am*
tlma. the action of to. a rrn?i preceding
that by Ilia man.
Both aeestamg alao voted ?? adi pt the
hoddet ayatem of hand) ' g thr finance*
of the meetln*
l\JI Nil) % * I 11 oh III K*.
\t INI. Teaaa Ma* ? With the
death of K I Ixx-ktna ? <t*titan aim
tor. the thtrit fatality fruitan airplane
-rash at a local a* *'!? t ^ield yeater
> waa record*- ! lx>rklr.g died late laat
night Mlea Margaret l.vraon and M> -
.-hunlc t'araon were klll*<l when the
plan" fell.
c
Fire Record I
A M Loea
II :SO?ISM L*aalngton a* Henel Trn
den ......Trifling
lift.'- IM Molt at tote Kin* It roe Trifling
* :1ft?art-'i lA>ng*iMxt a*. The Hroi*
Minerva Hock .. Unknown1
Mdh-IWl Lexlngaoa a*., ften'aeitn
gllvereteln Unknown
11:3ft- 117 IP K Jth at . Bather
Yaneky Ti fling
P M
lit :a*>? I Oh K. lllth at . Benjamin
Cohen Tufting
Kp^gON-LET
The Perfect Table Water
Paradise is simply the purest water on How ran any public supply of water,
record, as shown by Government re- or alY* artificially-pre pa red water,
port.. A. it gushe. forth from I'ar.- I""V J' 7Pn. V* Nat"""
_ . . ... , , , made purity of Paradise?
dise Spring in Maine, day by day, it
flows through a glass pipe Into a glass- w^at R delicious taste Para
lined storage tank, thence into a ''ls< , ^Pr enP ^ * '? 'D 1
silvor-lined bottling machine. Before ,1"nn.?j '?!? lit"""!". to go back to
lining filled, the bottle, arc mated. ,lr,nk,")! " ?rd,n?r-V *'r
rinsed and sterilired; and onlv brand- **? .parkle. like a dj.mond-.nd l.
, ... , * as flawless. It is a delight to the eve
new bottles are ever used. 11 *u . , ,,
as well as the palate. Preserve your
Thus, Paradise Water flows straight health and please your apjietite, by
to you from the Spring itself, with no drinking only Paradise -the perfect
possible chance of contamination. table water. Why not try it?
Paradise comes tn convenient cases of quarts, pints and half-pints, all full-size.
Natural or Carbonated. Your Grocer or Druggist has it or can pet it for pou.
ACKER, MERRALL & CONDIT CO. CHARLES & CO.,
All Stores. 4Id St. & Madison Ave.
1' A R A DISE SPRING C O M P A \ V. B R V XSW1C K. MAI N K
PARADISE WATER
AMUSEMENTS.
AMERICA'S FOREMOST '1
Matinee To-d*y 2:15.
WEEKS ""
lintinit UAUiacn a
TUBUS
VE HOWARD 200
A MBASSADOR Tl
Bvi. 8:30. Mats To-m'wtfl
rih fit.. Just
.1 ?st of R'way.
,'wAHat Te.Clr 8752
THEY WENT ??OVER THE TOP"
THE "DUMBELLS"
In Thalr Unique Musical Revue
"BIFF! BINGM BANG!!!"
A SURE-EIRE HIT.
PI YMDI ITU 4/lUi Street. West of B'way.
rL 1 1 n Mats. Thurs A Sat 2:20.
LITHE OLD NEW YORK
LADIES NIGHT
Is t he nnn ? ot v. new rnotion picture
Comedy llit
WWMOHURST if
HampEeN
?v WM. ARCHER
\tMinces Thurs. A Sat. 2:80.
\ BOAT I.OAI) OF H S"
( 'Aar|i.t Itarntiin _h'i It'(?? !<!_
THE
VtWLY
PAK< K
wtth Vivian Martin A l.ynne Overman.
ntt'US I/O' 'Kl"l HI" ?!'.
JUST MARRIED
MARRIAGE" Original Cast. "Finest
ssmai
T YRIC I
t V TWICE DAILY, 2 15
The World's Greatest Motion Picture
F I TIMf.F W??t 42d St. Eves s :io
Mats. Wed A Rat.. 2:30
7SHAME?
{T-'NTRAI Thea . 47thA B'way. E vs.
V-IMN 1 IVvL Nhk To.u,w Btld s,t. at 2:13
"I UN AN I' In tiie HOChK. I'oiigt. & S t. Ngt
TAMIMi of the SHKKW To-m'w Nkrht.
MACBETH. Thursday Matinee.
HAMLET. Thursday Night.
MKRCHAXT of VENICE. Fri. Ngt .ASat Mt
RnnTU 4Mb. W ?St of U way. Eves. s .30.
If' \laiinees To-m'w and Km. 2:30.
A THE GREEN
ARLISS coddess
42<i St Mats. Wed A Sat. 2:30.
?uivrn I Hv 81 ERVINE
"II ALU (with Margaret Wyeherly
and OrlKlnal Cast. "Finest
Acting In N. Y." Er World.
THEATRE
42nd St.& B'way.
AH 15 1' M
tSrvCwsJ 6v
J (jOODOH Cdmmo5?
Moat Sensational and Most Thrilling
Screen Spectacle Ever Shown
"'the ? harlot ra'e was the last word III
thrl'ls Hletorc love stor> a (treat sueecss."
H <? Welch Eve Telegram
DAILY MATS -ne-?l 50 Eve* M)e-S2 (Kl.
AMUSEMENTS.
?HEATKE8 AND HITS. DIRECTION OK I
At AC||T||Dlf THEA., (HJd St AO ntr I
or R I UN I J.arl w M w To-11' W A Sat
OPENING TONIGHT at 8:15
The Messrs LEE tint! J. J. BHTJBEKT Kr?M-nt
Oscar Straus* operetta
iNmrtWrr
ST'
ELEANOR PAINTER
AND V COMPANY OF 17,', ARTISTS
FIRST MATINEE TO N ORBOW
SELWYN THEATRES V3VstsT
TIMP^ THEATRK. EVES K 30
i nvice7 jkj. mats nil k &SAT.330
CHARLES PURCELL
in THE RIGHT GIRL
A lTe.ni Musical Entertainment,
with DOLLY CONNOLLY. ROBERT
WOOLSKY. MAX INK BROWN and
TOM LEWIS.
OTH BIO WEEK. lies) Scats $2.30.
I
PLAYHOUSE ~ y,"
wmg-TaBrf
*q"/T op a-way.
^ARTHUR ^
^CHO/T BETV/EEM
A HILAFIOUS COMEDY'
? SHAME?
ANDERBILT^
W. 40511
8 30 -HATf WED S.SAI
IT I1C WDRL11'SaWEETI IE ART
YEAR.
IRENE
SELWYN
WILLIAM FOX prtscTits a piiTturi/.ation of?
Mark Twain's ramous Comedy IiMnu?n?*e j
? a r AMMrr'Tir'i tt ?
'A CONNECTICUT
YANKEE ,N K,NC
ARTHUR'S COURT"
StaKed by Emmett J. Flynn.
M allnces 2:30. Best Sea twin Orchestra* 1.0<) I
(iiHid Orchestra Scats for \latlnccs .'f!c.
EvenltiKHH:30. 0ood8eat.sin0rchestra$1.00 1
Hoc I Sent* In Balcony ,'.0c.
AO Seals Roeervod. War Tax Extra.
PARK theatre
r ra. rv. xv Broadway and 5nth Sir
WILLIAM
FOX
Presents
OVER THE HILL
By WUlCarlrton. Difiprted by I faro* MUlarrlo
Mat*. at 2:30. fiood Seat* in < >rrhr>. 5fv.
Kv . at 8:30. Good Seat* in Orch. f 1.00.
Good Seats in Balcony fiOr.
AH Scats Heservod. War Tax Kxtra
AJij u" S FifFJi T>
Tht v* erm>*. tjttA $ J WfeoNMrf '* t'vn 1^1 ?
"v^^'Sr/ll ? tLfr?'s
"PHOEBE
or wi \i.it> ntkkk r
DOROTHY WARD rd SHAUN GLENVIllE
AMI OK* >T ' \*T
_ rmrr Mvri' re ro '<>iiH<>?
princess xz*
EMPEROR JONES Ms'*"
RJLTON V?
LAST TWO WEEKS
QVhk'i Enter Madame
324TH PKKKi'H t' \ ME T" H1"HT
BELMONT "
Miss Lulu Beit
laaTit perfobsi vvo r< ? vi<.?? r
? SHAME ?
Li file natr? of & mm n pi?*t in
44th ST THE ATR&
L DAILY ?W5 J IS EYENIN4J M
TId.W.Griffithx
MASTERPiFCg
SYMPHONYOdOi?STfiA
65 W. J5th Eve*., 8.20 I
Mat. Thura. & hat. 2.20 I
"L I LI O M"
* THEATRE Gl'ILD PHOniTmr>N |
I B 1
I ? i
?'OLBROOK BlINN
THE BAD MAN
? RITZ^Afg^ml
LONGACRE Sb8:S0
GRANT MITCHELLchawiSn
"Til K I I'VN I EST I1!. V V I >.* T( >5V \ _ *<in
Wm. A. iOth Ct Thca., E. of B y. Eva. h:20.
Hriulv's Will 01. Mats. Timrs. A Slit. 2:20.
The BROKEN WING
I set rue <r/?y4 5-v//v* ammopi A/Yt lJ
B I fOU ,vh VVe*t ?t Bw?y. Eves. 83a
J M tinees Tom' vund S; in
TIRLEO ?
DITRICH STEIN
? iTOTD
fKEPUBLK'. W. 42 St. Mt*.Wed.ASat.-J :?0.
I LAST WEEK.
IGRAOK la KCTE and
1HALF. HAMILTON
(LITTLE
THEATRE
Wi-t 44 St
Dear Me
'sik. 1st Year
Mats. Wjd.. Thurs. Sc Sat. 2 ?IO
ASTOR ME DAILY-All 5EAT.S RESERVED?
METRO.
r
Tir^k'lTTQ FOR ALL THEATRES Th. TYSON & CO. 1472 B'WAY. 4089 Brvant I
1 lLNL I J 50c ADVANCE 0risi">' established is3j iqq B'WAY. 9100 Rector |
CARNEGIE HAIL. THURS. EVE.. MAY 12
At t 15. I.AHT APPEARANCETHIB REASON
SPECIAL. SONG RISC IT A I.
GALLI-CURCI
HEATH NOW HEELING AT BOX OFFICE
Pr1i???l.$1 V- '.*?'! I
Wir T?? 1'**i M*t I ? ? Hti>tn? n . ?
CARNEGIE IIAI.E. Fltll'AV EVE MO Ft
THIRD AND LAST RECITAL
Of ri
ALFRED
MIROVITCH
UrntruHit
T!rlr*t? 7 V to ??' H'.x ln~.)
BENEFIT: UNION SOCIAL CENTRE
? ? *?* V.-U
Aeolian Mall, Friday Aft., May 13. at S. j
BAUER-GABRILOWIISCH
Benefit fur a French Mualclan.
Tlrheta at !'?<?* Office Damn A Hamlin Piano. |
"akoCTan ham., TO NIOHT AT ?:30!"
COMMONWKAl.TIt ("RNTHK ITwaenta
KOROl.EWICZ-WAYDA
F^preno War.aw 'lund Opera Co.. In P0II1I
Sonfa, Rene fit I'oilah Orphan* Kaltrf Fund.
? SHAME?
I> the nam* of a new motion picture
CAPITOL Srstiws,y
2nd SENSATIONAL WEEK
D. W. GRIFFITH'S
Hperlal Presentation
Adapted and I Hnlvrd
by ft L lloTHAFK.L
Capitol Grand
e,lrt ( PlSm )
return 3. 7, It .14
Flrat I'arformanc*
11 40 A. M
"Not a aolltary rpectarulat plrtura. to
Kgii*I It."?\cv Votfc World.
FAHAMOPNT PICTtlREB.
RJ.V o u1 "DECEPTION"
jSnMNw* u TOnU Oilmit OftfMMtfi
R!AI THEWILOSOOSE
Hyt are
RITI .KI0N W lam 4a MO*.
. THE LOST ROMANCE"
CRITI
B'way
(MM fa/fort Gamete
MCSMIYM rSJP
? SHAME ?
*fT
oc
Lotw'i New York Theatre A Roof
Cant II A M It It I' M Ho?f It I A N
"TNtt m m "? ?irrr *
Loew'tAmrrx an *,*" *.?*?*??!? JV
Ml 5mc
. Kemrvmt
StRanD
I'OLA NEGRI
CLUMHA - wt
"HIP-HIP HOORAY."
(ALLSAOI > -C PARK
oppnatt* W imtti at Faery N?<W
OPRN M? NKW ATTRACTION*
Metropolitan Opera Season
HAS CLOSED
For twenty-four weeks thousands of admirers and
lovers of grand opera have witnessed at the Metro
politan Opera House the most beautiful, artistic and
superb productions of grand opera ever known in the
history of the world. The season has been a glorious
triumph, not only for the artistes, but for the talent
ed genius Giulio Gatti-Casazza, Director General of
the Metropolitan Opera Company.
Now that the season is over and these pretentious
offerings which have been such a credit to the city of
New York are at an end temporarily, the thousands
of lovers of grand opera in this city have nowhere to
go to spend their evenings.
But?
The lovers of grand opera will find themselves amid
surroundings and in an atmosphere in harmony with
their artistic tastes, if they will attend the presenta
tion of ''The Queen of Sheba" at the Lyric Theatre.
The musical setting for this gorgeous picturization
is by Erno Ilapee, and is an inspiring score in which
many famous masterpieces are artistically blended.
"The Queen of Sheba" is the story of the love
romance of the most beautiful queen the world has
ever known, with the great King Solomon. The
scenes take place in the ancient Orient three thou
sand years ago and show the pomp and ceremony of
ancient t;mes reproduced on a scale of magnificent
grandeur.
"The Queen of Sheba" is presented by William Fox
and is unquestionably the most artistic triumph ever
known in the world of motion pictures. It is given
twice daily at the Lyric Theatre and not to see it is
to miss the greatest of all motion pictures.
NEW TORK'B I. K ADINO THEATRBS AND RUCCESSES
F M P ! R F IfwjmMliy K'? .it S K. V.- < Kvx K I.*. Vn ffdMNJO
ETHEL & JOHN j CLAIR HARIIYKNHILUR^VT///^
Barry more LLNI. Ueon
mi< ium rraiMii'i \>? Phf AM5TER0AM aoor
MK hael IIECFELOHUMKHT FROLIC
BELASCO Th?,* a h i ?' ? r-.'" tfn FISHER'S wwioanoys tmi OfKM
Lionel Atwill wmSiv
DRBURA' lARRIMORE WlCf WOW
LYQ I M . MANHATTAN '?
IN A flAlRF "THE GOLD "V 1"! op*r? Hwma TO SAT. MAY 14TH
. -the THREE MUSKETEERS'
KNICKERBOCKERS? i <v?t..mr n
THl Of AO Of TNT YEAR I
JUNE LOVE
M AT *F I' IIKHT hK \TN S3 OO
LIBE RTY 'f'fV-:. LAST 2 WEEKS
MITSI
M the rM?1r Lit "l.wljr Rllly"
BEST SLUTS TO-M W NUT. $2,
... nsn. ,,. ? in "THE TYRANNY OF LOVE"
111 IaW^i Vv ' ' "i * * *?' 2 HIRINOI.V DIFFERENT."
TUU.lu rijncu..jtjcr -? " a; M'nntKj
rllten Ami <'nmt>o>8*t by Rlrhfj.1 If Temple
r..p I'ri-r.. IV. In.-ln.l.v! ?2.
HENRY MILLER'S T!!'.,?,,~
I vs .1" Mats Till US A Hat . 2 30
MR. PIM PASSES BY
will. 1.%'ta Hope Crew a %n<t NolaMe <"??!
A THEATRE lil ll.H I'Ronr?"ri?N.
fYlUT TUBA . Most 4*?h St. Eves 8 .30
MVIA I To-morn)W A Sat. 2.30,
* ' '? .if Kutelle aJIriMiilan
Cherry, Winwood, Tynan
!1 TV R mrylk 40 St Mnt?AVd ASnt a id
FRAN
COHAN \\V. hJL* 2& * ** $2
A Twiimwiw tW.ubi ?lo'fc Trlumpli'
: TWO LITTLE
sLr ri.ss GIRLS IN BLUE
r%* i$m* RMWfV i'A?m in 1 nun'
3 AH HHARki iw 42H
MA" %\ : iyT j? ?0-BKVWT ftJ1<
TSSfflEEH
An Advertisement in the Lost and Found Columns of
THE NEW YORK HERALD offers a real possibility of
recovering your lost property. Telephone Chelsea 4000.

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