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The New York herald. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, August 24, 1921, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045774/1921-08-24/ed-1/seq-8/

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THE TIE-UP
Tic your building opera
tion to an organization of
experience, if you don't
want it tied up with ex
pense!
THOMPSON-STARRETT
COMPANY
Building Construction
A Portion of Pershing
, Square sells for
nearly three million dol
lars. A great hotel accom
modates 2000 visitors and
registers from 900 to 1100
new guests every day. A
haberdasher pays?150,000
annual rental on a 20-year
leaseinvolving$3,0Q0,000.
This is uptown New York
?one great city within
another.
The newuptown branch
of the Mercantile, located
in the heart of this business
district, offers a service
which includes every phase
of the banking business.
\Mombor of FoJormi Mourn Systom
115 BROADWAY
. Uptown Office:
45th St. at Madiaon Are.
!j BORDEN BUILDING)
A NEW DAY EXPRESS TRAIN
to be known as the
"JAMESTOWN
EXPRESS"
ERIE RAILROAD
Will Be Installed. Effective
AUGUST 28
on Following; Schedule:
WESTWARD?TRAIN 1001.
From New York Dolly.
Leave West 23d St. . . 10:00 A.M.
leave Chamber* St. . . 10:15 A. M.
leave Jersey City . . . 10:30 A. M.
j Arrive Jamestown ... 9:00 P. M.
! Eastward?Train 1000 Daily.
I.eiive Jamestown . . . 7:30 A. M.
Arrive Jersey City . . . H:0<l P. M.
Arrive Chamber* St. . . 3:22 P. M.
Arrive West 23d ?t. . . . 8:25 P. M.
Parlor Car Dining Car Through Coaches
MISSION
GARDEN
FnrSale
fiy
Grocers
m
48c
per
Pound
Popular Pecause
Of Its Value
SALES ORGANIZATION
OR
INDIVIDUAL
To act as distributor for th? State
of New York for a standard electric
storage battery company; invest
ment up to 550,000 required.
Strictly high dais proposition: no
triflers or stock pedlers;' applica
tions confidential.
L 4. MeraJd, 280 B'way.
Passing years
What is more thoughtful
as the years come and go
than to fittingly remem
ber our dear ones who
have passed on?
In Memoriam
Noticesin The New York
Herald offer mute testi
mony of the thoughtful
ness of those still here.
. These notices may be
telephoned during the
day to
Chelsea 4000
After 10 P. M. telephone
Worth 1000^.
THE NEW YORK HERALD
1439,333 RAIL STRIKE
VOTES G9 OUr $00.!
Big: Four and Switchmen's
Officers Almost Ready for
Supreme Test.
DECISION IN A MONTH
Men to Be Asked if They
Accept Roads' Refusal of
Latest Demands.
WORK ON FORM OF BALLOT
Refusal of Lines to Promise
Not to Asp More Wage Cuts
Is Big- Objection.
Cleveland, Aug. 23.?Strike ballots
i for submission to 409,000 members of
the "Big Four" railroad brotherhoods
! and the Switchmen's Union of North
j America were being prepared at a
: Joint conference here to-day of mem
bers of the executive committees, chief
executives and assistant grand officers
of the five organizations.
When the conference adjourned the
form of the ballbt had not been defi
nitely decided on. The conference will
be resumed to-morrow.
In its present shape the ballot tells
the union members of the unsatisfactory
negotiations held In the last few months
between broil ?rhood chiefs and railroad
managers at .conferences In the West,:
Southeast and East as to whether the I
railroads Intended to ask for further de-j
creased wages after the 2 Vj per cent, re- '
dilution handed down by the Ballroad
Labor Board In Chicago, June I, and
now In effect, whether the roads would i
seek the elimination of time and one- I
half for overtime and asks if the mem- j
bers at-? satisfied to continue work un
der these conditions.
Executives .of the Southwestern roads :
did not meet with the chiefs.
Chief executives of the five organize- '
tlons, who have been in conference here
for several days. were Joined to-day by I
three members of the executive board of
each organization and several assistant
branch officers, about twenty-five men!
in all.
Ballots will be sent to 150,<100 active
members of the trainmen's organiza
tions, 115,000 firemen, 80,000 engineers,
50,000 conductors and 14,000 switchmen.
Warren S. Stone, grand chief of the
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers;
W. S. Carter, president of the Brother
hood of Firemen and Englnemen; L. K.
Sheppard, president of the Order of Rail
way Conductors; J anils Murdock, vice
president of the Brotherhood of Rail
road Trainmen, and acting president in
the absence through Illness of President
W. G. Lee, and 'Hiomas Cashln, presi
dent of the Switchmen's Union of North
America, were the chief executives meet
ing at to-day's conference.
When the ballot Is completed, probably
within a day or so. It will be sent to
active members of the five organizations
and a referendum vote will be taken,
j It was estimated that it will take a
1 month or more to complete the vote.
The ballots must be sent to the mem
, bers before September 1, under terms of
| a resolution adopted July 1 at a confer
cnce in Chicago of the general chair
I men of the organization.
ROADS TO SAVE LARGE
SUMS IN OVERTIME PAY
Look for Favorable Decisions
on Other Points.
; Although railroad officials here have
arrived at differing opinions on some
points as a result of their study of the
recent decision of the United States
Railroad Labor Board respecting over
time rates of pay for railroad shop
workers, they generally are agreed that
lire net result of the decision will be
TRACKLESS TROLLEY BUS
HAS TRYOUT IN DETROIT
Kuns on Rubber Tires and Can Swing In and Out of
Street Traffic Without Losing Grip?
Operated by One Man.
Special Despatch to Thi Nl'w York Mbual.d
Detroit, Aug. 23.?The trackless trol
ley bus, heralded as "the next step In
American street railway transportation,"
was given a try out on Detroit streets ;
to-day.
The trackless trolley car runs by elec
tricity, on rubber wheels, and carries
thirty passengers. It can be doublt
decked and pulls a trailer. To-day the
car attained a speed of thirty miles an
hour.
The Packard Motor Car Company and j
the Westinghouse Electric and Manu
facturing Company having cooperated
in creating a working model, the Munici
pal Street Railway strung special trol
leys over a section of Harper avenue,
and this morning, with Mayor Couzens'
and the Street Railway Commission,
demonstrated the use to which the track
less trolley may be put.
Long trolley poles give to the vehicle,
a wide range In the street, and It can
swing to right and loft to pass other
traffic. The type tried out to-day was
built by the Packard company, two
25 horsepower motors being Installed in
the chassis of a regular three and one
half ton truck. ?
The demonstration was the result of
roducs the amount paid out by the car
riers for overtime service.
The chief benefit of the decision for
tlje rallroadr, officials declared yester
day, lies In the elimination of time apd
s half pay for overtime work on Sun
days and legal holidays for all employees
whose work on those days Is necessary
for the continuous operation of the rail
road. With respect to Sunday and holl
?ay work, embracing running repalro
to cars and locomotives, signals, yards,
&c., the board took the position that "It
Is not Just to penalise the carrier for
that which it cannot escape."
$10,000 JEWELS TAKEN
BY CLIMBING THIEVES
Crawl Through Transom
From Balcony at Atlantic City
Special Despatch to Turn N?w York Herald.
Atlantic CITY, Aug. 23.?Using glass
top display cases on which to stand as
they lowered themselves Into the Board
walk Jewelry shop of Louis L. Wagman,
thieves last night got watches, rings
and precious stones valued at $10,000.
Entrance was effected through a
transom over a window, to which the
thieves had lowered themselves from the
balcony on the front of the Rendezvous
Park structure, of which the Wagman
shop Is part.
BARONE DENIED WRIT.
Mast Go to Prison for Life, Su
preme Court Itules.
Trbnton, N. J., Aug. 23.?The Su
preme Court to-day denied the applica
tion for a writ of certiorari to release
Antonio Barone. convicted of murder In
the first degree and sentenced to prison
for life.
Justice Bergen, who denied the appli
cation. held that In case a writ of error
should be granted the defendant would
have to go to trial for a capital offence.
On the second trial, the court pointed
out, the Jury might not recomtnend
mercy and the State would be compelled
to take the defendant's life.
3 CENT SANDWICH SOLD AT 10C. I
Ronton Commission Finds Hum at
Doable and Triple Cost.
Boston, Aug. 23.?The cheese sand
wich which retails for 10 cents In arm
chair lunchrooms here costs about 2% '
cents to make, the State Commission of
the Necessaries of Life reported to-day.
The ham sandwich which sells for 10
and 15 cents costs a nickel.
An analysis showed the sandwiches to
contain from Va.tO lli ounces of cheese
on an average and from 11-16 to 1%
ounces of ham.
?f
yj
ptAUTY ? STMNOTH ? POWER. ? C O M P Q R. T
Never was there such a value!
HAYNES
55
The new 1922 Haynes 55
?a full five-passenger tour
ing car with a 121-inch
wheel base ?velvety
powered, Haynes - built,
light-six motor ? indivi
dual fenders and individual
steps fitting gracefully into
semi-sporty lines?exterior
side cowl lights?cord tires
and genuine leather uphol
stery is indisputably the
greatest value oSered at
the price.
Months in * ance of its time?made
possibleby the foresight and experience
of the famous Haynes engineer?.
1V*J
l>v
V
$
1785
F. O. B. FACTORY
THE HAYNES AUTOMOBILE O.
w NEW vonu
HIS BROADWAY Tel. Clrho l ?
THE IIAYNES ACTOMOBII,E COMPANY, K?koi?. .1.
EXPORT OFFICE) 1115 llrmidwny. New York Ml . t . v
I. C. Klrkhnm. IMS Bedford Am., Ilrnoklyn, >,
M. 8. Motor < oruorntlon, 3,"II K(?*t MOtli St., I>. . N. Y,
J. .1. Worker. 1737 Blvd.. .leroey Cltjr, N. J.
t.nrrUu II. Phillip* Mm C?a 11 Central Ave.. N'cw.i. N. .1.
S3 ? T H ? HAVNdt Id AMIS 1C A'? ?,A?T CAR
i three months' thought and effort on the
I part of the Mayor and the street rail
; way department to develop some way of
meeting Detroit traffic needs. Designs
were made, specifications drawn, and
early this month the Mayor advertised
for bids on the specification.
The bus ts 24 feet long, 8 feet wide
< and weighs 11,600 pounds, compared
I with the 16,000 pounds which the
municipal street car weighs.
There are many features about the
| bus that commend It, engineers say.
I One is its simplicity of control. The
I entire control, both for power and
; brakes, is worked by the feet of the
: operator. A hind brake also is available
! for emergency uses. Power is thrown
on or off by a treadle much the same
as on an electric sewing machine. There
are two speeds, one about fifteen and
the other about twenty-five miles an
hour. There is no neutral, as on an
automobile; power is either on or off,
but the power can be made small or
great, according to the pressure of the
foot With control of power by foot,
the operator has both hands free to steer
and to open and close the single door.
The bus will be a one man affair so
far as operation goes. Mayor Couzens
said he favored ordering fifty buses im
mediately.
1,500 MORE MEN ARRIVE
FOR MARCH ON MINGO
Reported Two Regiments Are
Ready to Take Field.
Charleston, \V. Va.. Aug. 23.?Rein
forcen ents for the men encamped at
Marmet, a few miles from Charleston,
continued to arrive to-day at the hollow,
where It was estimated last night by
Sheriff Walker of Kanawha county, that
2,000 already had assembled since
Saturday with the expressed intention
of marching to Mingo county.
According to reports received at Got..
Morgan's office, 1,500 men from the
upper Cabin Creek coal fields arrived at
Marmet to-day on freight trains. All
mines In the Cabin Creek district are
reported to be idle on account of the
absence of miners.
Keports were current about the Cap
itol that two regiments of Federal troops
are being held in readiness at Camp
Sherman for duty in the coal fields
should the Governor ask for aid. Gov,
Morgan declined to discuss the reports.
A commercial airplane, carrying a
photographer, wtis reported to have been
fired upon as it circled the Marmet
camp to-day. Half a dozen bullets are
said to have struck the machine, but the
pilot and photographer escaped Injury.
SPINE SEVERED, MAN DIES.
Louis Palmer of Tarrytown, whose
n? ck was broken and spinal cord severed
on Monday, when he was hurt diving at
Croton Point Beach, died at noon yester
day In the Osslning Hospital. He wae
conscious until his death and able to
talk, although he was completely par
alyzed excepting for his right arm,
..?Mch hp cou'd move sligthtly.
PAY MUST STAY UP,
MINERS TELL DAVIS
Labor Secretary's Pica for
Consideration of Wa?re Re
vision Unheeded.
By the Associated Press.
Atlantic City, Aug. 23.?Secretary
Davis has been notified that his sugges
tion that the United Mine Workers con
sider wage reductions nt the coming
convention In Tndianapolts will not be
heeded, said W. L. James, executive rep
resentative of the mine workers at Wash
ington, here to-night
Mr. James, who arr1".d here with
James Lord, head of the mining depart
ment of the American Federation of La
bor, to see Samuel Oompers, also said
rhat the mine workers had asked the
Government to "keep Its hands off" In
wage negotiation matters.
Acting for his organisation. Mr. James
asserted he had made several visits to
the Department of Labor and that Sec
retary Davis had suggested that the
miners should consider Immediate wage
reductions, or nt least take this matter
tip at their convention to open In In
dianapolis on September 20. Mr. James
continued:
"We formally notified Secretary Davis
that the miners would not consider the
question of wage reduction. We told
s,m that because of the lack of steady
employment the miners to-day could not
make a living nt the wage rate they now
received. Also we did not consider It right
,V|at the Government should ask us to
abrogate the present wage agreement,
which runs until April t. 1922, and to
??hlch the Government Itself was a
party."
In regard to the State of Washington
where the miners quit work In protest
against wage cuts, Mr. James said the
Government was asked to "keep hands
off" In the negotiations with the opera
tors. and It was suggested that the De
partment of L?hor permit the miners to
settle their own wage difficulties In any
furt her controversion.
NEW YORK TEAMSTERS
SEATED BY FEDERATION
Death Benefit Controversy Is
Put Off by Appeal.
Rochester, N. Y., Aug. 23.?A contro- |
versy over the seating of delegates from !
six local teamster unions In New York i
city consumed nearly two hours at this |
afternoon's session of the New York
State Federation of Labor. At the end
of the discussion the delegates were
Boated.
The locals were suspended from their
International union when they refused to
pay an Increased per capita tax. They
alleged that a death benefit plan which j
they had proposed had been pigeon
holed by the International. An appeal j
from the International's action to the i
next convention has been acknowledged [
by the International, and was held by ;
the president of the State Federation to j
act as a stay of execution of the sus
pension.
Thomas J. Curtis of New York, chair- I
man of the federation's committee of j
compensation, declared before the con- |
ventlon that "the Industrial Board had
'Iven the workers a square deal and he >
ooed It would continue."
?? ????
3 MEN AND 3 WOMEN
GUARDED FROM MOB
0 Held in Slaying of 2 Sheriffs
by Marauding Party in
Kentucky.
Special Despatch to Thb New Yobk Hhuld
Knoxvii.lx, Aug. 23.?Three men and
three women are In Jail to-night at
Jacksboro, Tenn., on charges connected
with the slaying of two deputy sheriffs,
C. H. McDonuld and Andrew J. Wor
tham. They were killed on Monday
evening In the Narrows, between High
Cliff and Morley, near Jellico, after
tourists had complained that a party of
men and women were firing at passing
automobiles.
The two officers had hurried to the
scene in an automobile driven by Rich
ard King, and were shot dead.
Fred Jones and Vlrgie Reno, two of
the marauding party, were seen to throw
pistols In the river after tho shooting.
King, the chauffeur, then held them at
bay with a sand rock until Harvey
Harp, John Mowry and others arrived.
The two men and their young women
companions, Mary Bennett and Phoebe
Lane, were returned to Jellico and
locked up. Theratenlng crowds hung
about the Jail throughout the night, but
no attack was made.
Sheriff J. H. Harmon this morning
removed the prisoners to Jacksboro in
automobiles. Previously he had tele
phoned to his deputies at Lafollette to
arrest Charles Gurley, formerly Chief
of Police of Jellico, end Sophie Kelly,
said to have been members of the party
accused of the actual killing of the offi
cers, but not with them at the time.
Gurley and the three women are held
for aiding and abetting. Additional
charges. Including one under the Mann
act, are entered against Gurley.
FILM THEATRE OWNERS
FIGHT DAYLIGHT SAVING
Declare Plan Cuts Out One
Performance an Evening.
Atlantic Citt, Aug. 23.?An active
campaign against daylight saving was
launched here to-day at the convention of
the Eastern Branch of the Motion Pic
ture Owners Association, and it was de
clared that the screens in 10,000 thea
tres throughout the United States will
be used next winter and spring to co
operate In the fight on changing the
clocks again next sunvmer.
Delegates asserted that while adverse
Industrial conditions and hot weather
had lowered their attendance, they
blamed daylight time chiefly, as It vir
tually eliminated one show an evening.
They declared they would be supported
by the farmers in their work to have
the law repealed in States where it now
exists.
TWO DOCTORS DECORATKD.
Dr. George O'Hanlon, general medical
superintendent of Bellevue Hospital, and
Dr. John W. Perelli. member of the
Board of Trustees, were made Cheval
iers of the Crown of Italy yesterday by
T. F. Bernard!, the Italian Consul Gen
eral, at the consulate, 20 East Twenty
second street. The decorations were au
thorlzed In recognition of the work of
the two physicians In the reorganization
of the Italian Hospital at Eighty-third
street and the East River.
mauu
A "Sco
>>
r
Munsey's Magazine has made an- "Main Street" to mind. But our small
other "scoop"! towns totally lack thequaintness, the
'Madeleine," the literary sensation charm, the beauty of rural France,
of the day in France, is now being "Life is what this writer sees?life,
given to America for the first time by with all its dangers, all its glamours,
Munsey's Magazine, be- all its despairs, its doom,
ginning in the Septem
ber issue.
its loveliness, its loneli
ness, its glory, and its
anguish; and, through
it all, the sound of the
breeze blowing over the
woods and across the
reeds, the huge, fertile,
blossoming earth, all
seed and bloom, drift of
leaves that turn again
to flowers, and the ever
lasting Sorrow of the
Joy that mates and
u n m a t e s and mates
again. He sees the
earth with all its little
lives, so apparently
France; but here is a small, and yet so
This unusual story,
which has brought fame
to its author, took the
Goncourt prize as the
best book of the year,
and leaped into the posi
tion of a best seller al
most overnight.
"Many of us," says
Richard Le Galliennc,
"are accustomed t o
think that only sophisti
cated themes appeal to
the reading public of
With four serials
by Perochon, Sabin,
Cohen and Eliza
beth Holding, with
thirteen short sto
ries by such writers
as L. J. Beeston,
James W. Egan and
Ellis Parker Butler,
and the complete
novelette "Aot So
Easy,** by William
Slavens McNutt,
the September
Munsey's offers a
wealth of enter
tainment that you
can't afford to miss!
story of country life, written with ex- incalculable i n their mysterious
tremc simplicity by a hitherto un- significance."
known s< hool-tcachcr in the pro\ inccs, Although we are proud to give this
which last year snatched the much- grcat Frencb book to the Amcrican
coveted Prix Goncourt away from all publ|c> we fee| that th;s ;8 on)y onc
the clever ones of Pans, and which of the rcmarUabie storic3 offcrcd by
has in a few months had a sale of t^js magazjnc
seventy thousand copies."
"Madeleine" begins in the Scptcm
Nor will it be long before this book ber issue. We suggest that you get
is onc of the best sellers here. In your copy from your newsdealer early
fact, certain of its elements bring as his supply is limited.
MUNSEY'S
September issue now on sale at all newsstands
. 1 w * ';l "*""1 t.U' 1 ? ??"
oooooooooaaooooooflHSooooooocooooooaoooooooaaoooofi
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN says: " 'Tis easy to see, hard to foresee"
Does Your Family Come First?
I AOES the future happiness and safety of your
wife and children come before your own? Is
it more important than that business deal you
have in mind?
If it is, consider your will. Is it just what you want it to be?
Have you appointed an experienced and financially respon
sible executor? If not, you are invited to consult the Trust
Department of The Bank of America.
THE BANK OF AMERICA
ESTABLISHED 1612
Manhattan and Brooklyn
MMoaoooooottoannocHBooooaaooaoooooooaooooeKMHsotaa
AMUSEMENTS. 1 AMUSEMENTS.
AMERICA'S FOREMOST THEATRES k HITS. DIRECTION OF LEE & J. J. SHUBBRT.
28
I AST WEEKS. MAT. TO-M'W 50c TOK.
ComedyTo-Night
Leo shubert and Joaslo lions balk* Present
The Triumph of X
With an Excellent Oust.
FIRST MATINEE TO-MORROW.
flCTflD Thoa.. 45tli 4 H'way. Eves. 8.30.
HA I Un Matinees To-day 4 Sat. 2:30.
FIRST MATINEE TO-OAY
THE DETOUR
A Play by OWEN DAVIS.
With Effie .Shannon?Aunni n Duncan
Staffed by MR. DUNCAN.
VIOLET HEMINO 4 OTTO KRUOKIt In
48th St. The
?nt. Park \V.
Iteitular Playhouse?NOT a midnight shi) v.
Evea. 8:15. Po ular Matinee Saturday !:15
"A Rlnnlnff R?vti>'."?-Ou>nn AS rtin. II'
??Ml IC WORLD ?W
CFNTIIRY st 4 Central 1'ar.c West.
VCHI 1 UIV I Ev?.?:ia.Mt*.To-day&8t.2:15.
COOLE BY ON OF I OK
Wed. ii Sat. Mat a Resumed This Week.
POPULAR MAT. TO-DAY. 50c. TO $2.
TFE LAST WALTZ yhlX
fit I O II West I Evenings at 8:30.
40lh St. I MtS.To-d'iy 4 Sat.
MARCH HARES
3fth St. ?"diy
TKF. NIGHTCAP "AVft'iEJV!0
?t i at. i ne _ ' *t??uatly amuatn?."~Tlmea
The 1st Year
The (tauntingly Uea itli I Love Story. ^ Eva. S 30
PLAY HlrUbE Ha?.nKve. AUG. 27 " 8t' Muw' T?"DAY *8at'at 2*?
PERSONALITY
With Louis Bennlson and Henry E. D!xev\
i.t it TL 46th. West of H'way. Eves. 8:30.
>VWin Matineea To-day 4 Sat. 2:30.
A nCMCC ln THE GREEN
^AKLlbo GODDESS
MQBOICQ SfflftSkM
POPIIl.tit Xll'lNKd ? HI.
The bat
THE DRAMATIC S.vIA.4.1!
dATT-T CT Theatre, of R'way
I li w. I . Continuous 11 A.M. tu 11 P. M.
TEX RICKAKO presents
Dempsey- Carpentier
Official Rlncstde Motion Pictures.
CUIIDCDT Thea.,44th, W orB'way.Evs.8:3n
PnUCtKI Mats. To-day 4 Sat. at 2:30.
TFa^wly JUST MARRP
With Vivian Martin and Lynne Overman,
tmvrc TO THE NOB 4 tl.AYES
PC V. J TI'F.ATMK A'KVr AION >
_ c ? DDirir 3"'th E.nf B'way. Eves. 8:30 I CII. n L 4flth St. \v .of B'/ay.Evs.S: ;0
~ UAItlllvIVMats. To-m'w4 Sat. 2:30. I fwkllihMats. To-day & Sat. at 2:20.
~ MR. PIjv-. PASSES BY lk'o a t ui^nnkVo' 'LlLio.Vi =
E LAST T*i? WEEKS IN NEW YORK | FRANZ MOLNAlt'SGOMEDYoCLlFR =
DDT 1 CcC West 30 SI. Eves, at 8:30. |
rM.ACM Mats. TO-DAY 4 Sat 2:30. j
THE MASK CF HAMLET
/ NT'*/' DC" West 48th St. Eves. 8 30.
tv nUALRCi Mats. To-day & Sat. 2:30
'NOBODY'S MONEY'
with WALLACE EODINGER
WILLIAM FI?.V preseutt
p A ptf Theatre. 59 St. A Col. Cirri ?>
TWICE DAILY 230 an ! i ll
GOOD KEATS I'Olt ALL
MATINEES 50t?NIGHTS 30c-31.II
WILLIAM FARNUM n
PERJURY
DUDTIT T TP W. 42d St. Eva. 8:45. POP
Kr rur L.-t^ 81 WJ mat. to-day.
CFNTRAT H' WAV AT 47TH ST
Twice Dally. 2 30 4 8 '10.
HUNDREDS OF CHOICE SKATS
MATINEES 50c?NHilir.4 30c-U.it
THUNDERCLAP
[GETTING CERTIE5 CARTER
TIMES St
WILLIAM
COURTEN.VY
AND
101A FISHER
"It's a Darned flood
The., W ,428t. E vs.8:20.
^ M a tit. Thur.4 Sat. 2:20
Show'?and It's Clean.
LYRIC THEA., 42d SL.VV. of B" WW
TWICE DAILY, 2:30 4 8:30
THOUSANDS CHOICE SKATS AT
MATIN EEs 30c?NIGHTS 30c-.: Lit 1
SHAME m
YO' K'8 I.KADINU THEATRES. ,
NEW AMSTERDAM Wfest ^2StB?ai5
TIECFELD HIT/J flu
'4MYN MILLER&TlllA
EON ERROL'H^OUa^
OtORf THCAT1RR
.Mi iUi?mL IN^I I I Ul IWi
AECFEUFOUKi
POP. MAT. TO-PAY
SEATS AT BOX OFFICE
'"iKO. rnHIN B'y43dHt.|MAT. TO-D'YM
M. l?UHAH Eva*. 8 18. .Beat Seats u
AST 4 NIQ FITS-LAST MATS. WBD.-SAT.
l.L^'S'i'Two Little
Girls in Blue
Huut Milter's Theatre. W 4.1 St.
ntsr pup.Mir.ro-moicw
Cliwlw Dillingham Rroscnte
THE SCARLET MAN
"Top level of fun."-DeFoe. World
A Farm Comedy by Wm.I.eB?rr>n
AM k HARRIS THEATRE. W. 43d St.
>aw n. nnnnid Te, nr.Bnt <^,44.
vpenm, TO-MOR W NIGHT
SIX CYLINDER LOVE
1 New Comedy hy WrrtAnthony McCiulro
T!lih ERNEST TRUEX
"coitf si m?ttow ait
OeonteV. |^XBRfvi with Emma
lobart S 1 I ' A M pun. Frnest
rwmn __
Melody I'lay Kit || piendlnnln*
> nunc by . ? I UIUJ Mabel With V,
ayiiwnd Carl Randall
ubbell nn(| others
\ Wholesome Play with Harmony Tune*.
FRAZEE w"* 42<* s?- Erra. ?t s 20
Mats. TO-DAY A Sat. 3:20.
'The gayest comedy I ever saw."
?Booth Tarklngton
By Kaufman and
TV T T * \7 Connelly with
D U L C Y fontanne
LIBERTY DCD MATS W'ED* SAT
MAT T0DAY-50^25Qh??me?
rm
<a ANN nr-'?wiMT.TON
1A IF.TY, H'y A 40 Ml Slats Wed. A Sat
.Mu.%1141 II SEAT SAC.K TuMciititOW
MAIL OltUF.KS N11W
THE WHEEL
."I. 211
JOHN
col.l'FN
presents
A NEW PT.AY by W1NCH1I.I. SMITH.
Ct_ AMP Thee" 4fl HL. W.pdfy. iny. 070T
' stotiMS Kv?.S iO. Mi*. To-D y .?.*at.
MMUMORi-NICi PEOPiF
i'Tr?gmtnU"SolJyW*rd,Bo> Hall,
Sharkey, Rolh 4 Wilt, K.y Neilan,
IB?fc28lli5t God 4 Edwards, Rasso 4 Co.
5fhAv
23d Sh
F.I.AINK II A.MMI .ItSTKl.N In
'UKAIOKSKI .ESS MIVE" and
I.AKKV in
Inc ad Cu. A;/tI "THE KALI, Gt'V"
tntAB bHiAVt^^ StFHKMK VAI DKVIM.K
Big double fritturr "The Man
Worth While." 1-urrj Semon in
"The Foil Guy" ? Supreme Vau
deville^ and Ounoing Contest
58fh5t
ITCM3S
125th SI:
every Thursday nigh
ltlg Feature Special "Tile Mui
Worth While" nnd added ut
truction I nrr.i Semun in "The
Fnll Guy" anil Big Vaude
TOWN HALL. '
Eve*. 8.30 50c to $2. Mats. To-day 6i but.
50c. and tl.
FIRST MATINEE TO-DAY
Irvtn C. MIHor'w Colorful Muelcal Ronnie
PUT aw?TAKE
Spun from Georgia to Broadway AN'D
TOOK A* L!
,onre|a| Ml-'nleht Performance Kvery Krl.
R
R
IVOLl WALLACE REID
Broadway ln "Tl" "??" I'lie*"."
At l?th St. A Pa-amount Picture.
'AT TO THOMAS MEIGHAN
T1MFS ^ "I'APPY UK'HS"
Spy AWE A Paramount Picture.
(PJimW'SefiMTi
^CU-CJi Prolotfu? - Busror Kearor*
~ JOHN ~
McCORMACK
orr.AN GROVE ATMTORH M.
To-morrow (Tbunday) Night at 8:15
Spevial train* to Netc \urk of ten concert,
ntopping ot Intermedtote etudes*.
S-Vf . n I GLOkGE
U ! ARUM IN
"DISRAELI"
B'y, 47 St.
All This Week.
F.XINGTO ? w
GIGANTIC SfTSir I'RSTIVVI., 700 ARTIST*
TO-NIGHT?FRENCH NIGHT
i N I.I? VOl.PI?, Conductor.
M id"l' lii" MnrGul|(un?'*folti'?fe.
RESERVED Si ut* !t6c. OOo. 75o ami 81.00.
AADITA1 OtIUlWIN Present*"
? "arilUL "THE OLD NLSl"
ll'way at 01 8t. Chorua of 78 Volcea.
LUNA
iC9S?f ,...-,.~e
turtr a poot* hathino
~f7 fTT OH ' b UANiJ
CIllI.nitKN KTtr* WEEKDAt
AT?TEBN'VVXa ?/l?h PARENTS
liwb'KY 181.A NO. rut Rid** and Vr?? i'n ??
^ T-ddie" F 11% *rr^,njHif Fom.
p. ? 'I I".? meit Uc?r- %
Ciati* WMlnj, Ivan Fan
k -tf, O'l *. * Viet r Moora
A Emma TAttlefleld A Co.

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