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The New York herald. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, October 13, 1921, Image 13

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HOPE FOR IDLE SEEN1
IN UGREVIVAL
New Construction Could
Employ 3,000,000 Workers
for Three Years.
?
DATA ABE SUBMITTED j
Unemployment Conference
Urges Adjustments to
Speed Work.
LOCAL ACTION SUGGESTED j
Costs of Financing:, of Materials
and of Labor Must Be
Lowered, Says Report.
fipaeial Despatch to Tin New Yoik Htun.
?w York Ilerald Barus, )
Washington, 1). C.. Oct. IS. )
Two million workers, a number
equal to more than one-half of the
nation's entire list of unemployed, can
he given regular work for three years
through a revival of the building industry
throughout the United States,
according to the findings of the conference
on unemployment made public
to-day. The findings were In a report
submitted by the committee on building
and approved by the entire conference.
At least $10,000,000,000 worth of new
construction is urgently needed by
the country as a result of stoppage
of construction during and immediately
after the war, the report
stated. It concurs with the findings
of the Senate Committee on Reconstruction.
Building on Increase.
Building is beginning to increase, it
was announced, but greater progress is
regarded as essential. Approximately 39
per cent, of building now going on is
for residential purposes, the committee
found. Indicating construction men are
whittling away at the nationwide dwelling
shortage and high rents.
To revive construction in a decided!}
beneficial mannor to the entire Country
the cost of materials, . financing of
building loans and labor, must be reduced,
according to the report.
Adjustment of these factors is a matter
that can be accomplished onlylocally
through efforts of officials, dealers in
materials, builders, workers and bankers,
It was stated.
Tho conference recommends that Secretary
of Commerce Hoover name a
eommltoee to cooperate with local
groups in bringing about reductions of
freight rates on building materials and
the standardization of building costs to
bring about economies in manufacture
of building materials.
"If local conditions prove satisfactory
there is no reason," read the report,
"why work should not proceed Immediately.
This is especially true of
persons contemplating the building of
their own homes and who are now pay
inff rentals oasea on innaua vmure*.
"Money must bo made available on
reasonable terms and in reasonable
volume and free from demands of business
and commissions of ques; lonablo
character.
"The savings deposits of the people
are the natural economic source of loans
for home building. The aggregate is
implc for this purpose even though a
portion Is paid by adequate investment
In more liquid securities to meet withdrawals.
There would bo no difficulty in
financing homes If the fundamental principle
of the use of long term deposits
lor homo loan and long term purposes
was generally followed. In every section
of the country owners have declined
to start new projects on account of the
financing charge, but both the interest
rate and commissions and the premiums j
paid for loans being discouraglngly high, j
Commissions from 10 to 20 per cent, j
hive been charged in addition to in- 1
erest at 7 and 8 per cent. When an
owner must pay such sums before construction
work starts, many projects
have necessarily been abandoned 'in the
face of continual need and demand for
building.
Iletullers Keep Prices Up.
"Many construction materials have
been substantially reduced In price,
fbme have been reduced to a point which
s retarding production. It Is apparent,
however, that other construction materials
have not been reduced' In keeping
with the trend of wholesale prices
on other commodities. In many Instances
retailers of construction materials
have not yet followed reductions
put Into effect by manufacturers and
uimone'
ANTIQUES?p|f|E FUR]
42-44 East 49th Street,
TOVFRS OF HOIN
I V jUi "%K/ V * ? * '
genial atmosphen
arrangement of them
the courteous deportir
It is a House of SerV
Europe, and frequenl
domestic production
ture, keep us abreast o!
ready at all times to
i matter of quality and
and?particularly to-c
An interesting Fall oflcrii
antique tone Early I tali
Chairs arc covered in Taj
j Regularly marked at... .
OUR SPECIAL PRICE .
Tor *!l fine furniture and wood
rial Cle*n:rNt, Oil ?sfiipped ?
FORD BUYS FIRS
REALIZES A L
Old School Book, One of 1
Than a Railroad, He S
His Education
Speoal Despatch to Tub New Yoaa Hbuij.
Cincinnati, Oct. 12.?The secret ie a,
out. Henry Ford did not come to
Cincinnati to buy a railroad as re
rorted, but a Mcduffey's first reader. ic
And now one of the life ambitions of ' U
the motor wizard hae been realized, hi
for, when Henry went to sleep tonight
one of the three unsolled "Mc- ei
Ouffey'e Firsts" said to exist nestled ' tl
V,!. nlllnw i r<
In addition to this book, which Mr.
Ford says is the volume from which
he gleaned the larger part of his edu- f'
cation, he is now the proud owner oi ?
a third, fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh
reader of the series. a
Mr. Ford to-day slipped away from ]j
his friends and visited a big book store f
on Government Square, where he timidly
asked for a McGuflfey's first reader. The i
shopkeeper smiled. n
wholesalers. This Is a subject to be n
taken up Ideally in each community.
"The question of labor costs cannot *
be regulated by national action. The
cost of living, rentals and working conditions
varies in each community. Where
fair wage adjustments have not been
niado construction is being held up. i
We believe the employer should not permit
the wage of his workmen to go t
below that point at which it not only x
provides sufficient to take care of the
necessities of life but also enough to
enable the family to educate the children
properly to provide reasonable
comforts and conveniences, and to permit
systematic saving. Due allowance
should be made for seasonal employment.
a
"The workman, on the other hand,
_* i J MAwlvnuwi ^
enouici aenver maAunuiu y. v?uvMV?.
with proper Interest In the welfare of a
the business out of which his wages are p
paid, and should eliminate restrictions d
and measures which tend to interfere o
with his production or with the pro- c
ductlon of others. Jurisdictional con- a
troversies In the construction Industry a
should be permanently abandoned as
measures detrimental to the public wel- a
fare." e
Samuel Gompers filed a protest n
against the reference to jurisdictional
disputes when the conference was considering
the committee report Gompers also
objected to a section of the report
which coupled together the cost of ma- .
terials, financing and labor. Labor, he "
said, is not merely a construction factor J
or commodity.
Takes Issue With Gompers. I
c
Mr. Donlin, president of the Building z
Trades Department of the A. F. of L. e
and also a member of the committee j,
which framed the report took Issue with h
Mr. Gompers and demanded that no
change be made In the report The o
Building Trades Department Donlin o
said, had eliminated all jurisdictional a
controversies between unions excepting 2
one between the sheet metal workers
and the carpenters. *
Less than 50,000 men are now em- r
ployed in American shipbuilding yards. *
the committee on shipping reported, as
compared with 94,478 on January 1 this 1
year and 176,705 on the same date in J.'
j 1919. Eleven out of forty steel shipbuilding
yards on the Atlantic and Gulf r
coasts are closed, according to the report,
while of the 2,079 vessels owned by
the United 8tates Shipping Board 241 t
are tied up Idle.
As temporary measures of relief both
aboard ships and In yards, the commit
tee recommenaea eunnnmivu m .......
work, split time between worker* to dietribute
the lack of Jobs and preference t
to American seamen over foreign work- a
ere. Tlie Shipping Board is now fol- o
lowing all these recommendations, the t
report stated. 2
As permanent measures of relief the g
committee recommended prompt action t
on enforcement or amendment of the
Jones shipping law; sale of Government v
owned vessels to private Interests; es- \
tablishment of a maritime code and f
faithful enforcement of the coastwise p
shipping laws. r
The committee also urged that American
ships should be given every possible
encouragement by the Government (
through contracts to carry mails an.1 I
federally owned cargoes.
FINGER PRINT TOWN;
FAIL TO GET SLAYER
Theory Bank Murderer Was
Citizen Goes Wrong.
Special Despatch to Ths Nbw Tobk Hskals.
Chicago. Oct. 12.?The plan to take the
finger prints of all the men In Glen view,
j 111., in the belief that Fred Chrlstensen,
! an employee of the Glenvlew State
I Bank, who was found shot to death In
the bank three weeks ago, was slain by
a local cttlaen. has apparently failed.
The finger prints were taken more
than two weeks ago and no trace of the '
slayer has been found. The Inquegt
was continued Indefinitely to-day for
further investigation.
=? I
1
pp~ II
xmim
N1TURE ?OBJETS d'ART
bet. Madison and Park
4E find here a con:?in
the goods, the
, the fair prices, and
lent of the personnel. II
ice. Yearly visits to
tly to the centers of
of only Fine Furnif
the wants of the day,
satisfy them in the
I comprehensiveness,
lay?in that of price.
ig: A 10-piece Walnut,
an Dining Room Suite.
jestry.
*693.?
*521.00 I
work wt recommend our ?penywSere.
$1.50 per bottle.
V YORK HERALD, TI
WIZARD SAYS KLAN
ISN'T ANTI ANYTHING
Object Is Religious and Race
Tolerance, He Tells House
Committee.
WILL DISBAND IF GUILTY
Simmons Assails Motives of
Newspapers Which Are
Assailing Order.
THB NEM
>T READER; \
IFE AMBITION
"hree in Existence, Better !
lays?Will Complete
This Winter.
"We sold the last one twenty-Ave years
So," be said.
Then seeing the shadow of disappointicnt
that tinged the other man's face,
e added, "Why don't you try the Anieran
Book Company, they used to pubsh
McGuffey's readers and they might
ave one left."
Mr. Ford plodded over to the book j
jmpany's place. W. T. Howe, the genral
manager, received him, but, like I
le bookseller beforo him, failed to ]
scognize his visitor. Ho listened while
tr. Ford stated his business. Then he
100k his head.
"There are only three unsold McGufsy's
firsts In existence, ' he said. "We
ave two here and one is in Xew York,
would hate to part wilu one of them."
Mr. Ford talked for fifteen minutes
nd won after his identity became
nown. He left with a copy of MeGufey's
First Reader under his arin.
"I'd rather have it than a railroad,"
Ir. Ford said. "I'm going to complete
ay education reading this winter."
PRAIN CREW UNIONS
UNLIKELY TO STRIKE
leads of Big Four Fail to
Beach Agreement After i
3 Days of Meetings.
Chicago, Oct 12.?Little likelihood or
decision to call a strike of r&llroad
rorkera of the big four broth.jrhood3
>am forecast to-night by L. E. Sheppard,
resident of the Order of Railway Conuctors.
After three days and nights
f meetings the executives and general
halrmen of the conductors, engineers
nd firemen to-night were still far from
greement. Mr. Sheppard said :
"It Is likely now that there will be no
nnouncement made when these conferncea
adjourn. Thus' far we can say
othlng. and It now seems probable that
Here will be nothing to say."
Warren 3. Stone, grand chief of the
brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers,
nd \V. S. Carter, head of the Brotherood
of Firemen and Englnemen, said
hey, too, would probably have nothing
o say even after the conferences.
To-day was the busiest of tbe week,
'ollowlng long sessions of the general
aonK est h * t'.irAA nrffsni
ations yesterday and Monday the excutivo
committees of the three brotherioods
Interspersed the chairmen's meetigs
to-day with secret conferences.
W. G. Lse. head of the Brotherhood
f Railroad Trainmen, the fourth body
f the big four group, arrived to-day to
wait ths action of the remaining trio.
Ir. Lee said:
"Our men havo voted to strike and I
rill give them my authorization the
ninute the other three say the word,
t is up to them."
Mr. Lee added, however, that lie wc/1
lot expocting strike action, and that ha
rould not be surprised to see the cotierenccs
end without definite action.
T. C. Cashen, president of the Kwitchnen's
Union of North America, which
ilso voted to strike on the Joint bailot
if the brotherhoods, was not in Chicago
o-day.
FARMER SLAIN IN DRY RAID.
Louisville. Oct. 12.?Two prohibition
mfopcement officers were shot and an
dleged moonshiner was killed In a raid
n a cabin near Bardstown, Ky.. early
o-day. L. II. Gilbert of Louisville and
C. E. Reed of Edmonton county were
hot through the legs when they atempted
to destroy a still in the cabin.
As they entered the structure they
nere flred on from the brush. The tire
Has returned and Arthur Burman, a
armer, fell dead. Two of his com>anionn
were taken prisoners.
?III? ..." XS
1921 VOCALION
PRICED AT PR!
^Voc
The
Supren
you at j
If yot
^ \ you ma
\ the vo
reprodi
beauty
When
j yoursel
i hil (an<
-thc(
'/ Vocal
Grad
THE AEOLIAT
AEOLIAN HALL, 2?
/? THE BRONX . In *""">
367 Ea?t 149th St. r 1? Hatt
ih fori
270 E- Fordl
TL
Special Drapatcn to Th? Nbw Yosk limu.
New York Herald Bumtn, (
Washington, l>. C.. Oct. IS. J
The Ku Klux Klan was defended before
the House Rules Committee to-day
by its Imperial wizard, Col. William Joseph
Simmons of Atlanta, who entered a
denial of the charges which have been
made against the organization.
J The Klan is not anti-Jew, anti-Catholic
nor anti-negro, according to CoL Simmons.
He insisted it was not organized
for personal gain and he declared
charges it has "taken the law Into Its
own hands" were untrue.
"The charge Is made," he said, "that
we are organized to preach and teach
religious intolerance and especially that
w? are anti-Roman Catholic and antinegro.
The works of the Klan prove
this absolutely rnitrue. Many alleged
outrages have been attributed to the
Klan, but none of these were against
Roman Catholics, Jews and negroes, per
se, and none were committed by the
Klan."
Col. Simmons counter charged that
the campaign against the Klan was
started by a New York newspaper to
gain circulation and that another New
York newspaper followed eult when its
circulation began to drop.
"Just as Judas betrayed Christ for
thirty pieces of silver," said Col. Simmons,
"so there was found by one of
these papers a former ^lansman who
for money betrayed his oath. My information
la that this man was paid
15,000 cosh and $100 a week as long as
he worked on the stories."
Col. Simmons read a long statement
In which he denied the charges against
the Klan. He was permitted to finish
his statement without Interruption, and
because he complained or illness ne was
excused from cross-examination until tomorrow.
The imperial wizard began by
revealing the origin of his lesser title.
"Colonel." He Is a Spanish War veteran.
but he did not gain the rank of
colonel until he Joined the. Modern Woodmen
of America, In which organization
he commanded a "regiment."
Ho told the committee he hoped it
would make the most thorough Investigation
of the Klan and promised that if
on* one-thousandth part of the charges
against it were proven he would call
the Grand Concilium together for the
purpose of disbanding the organization.
Representative Tague of Boston, who
Is urging the Inquiry, informed the committee
that Jewish opponents of the
Klan were unable to be present because
they were engaged In observing Yom
Klppur to-day. He Indicated that they
would be prepared to take the stand
against the Klan as soon as Col. Simmons
has completed his testimony.
INVESTIGATION BEGINS
OF K.K.K. PARADE DEATH
Waco, Tex., Oct. 12.?Twelve witnesses
were examined during to-day's
session of the McClennan county Grand
Jury investigating the fight at Lorena,
near here, October 1, when Sheriff Bob
Buchanan attempted to holt a Ku Klux
Klan parade. In which ten men were
wounded, one of whom died later.
Stress on the oath of secrecy was
laid by District Judge E. I. Munroe, In
bis charge to the Grand Jury, which
was Instructed to Investigate the affair
"thoroughly, without fear or favor" and
ft "fiv thA htdmA whATA It nvAnnrlv Ka.
longs." He expressed the belief that
more than 100 witnesses would be questioned.
Physicians held practically no hope
for the recovery of Sheriff Buchanan,
who was shot, but to-night his condition
was reported slightly Improved.
I MODELS ARB 33T
J-WAR VALUES
Irr
t
:alion
onograph Supreme
ic in its power to please
iny time and in any mood
i would simply listen,
ty hear the instruments,
ices you most care for
iced with unapproached
and realism.
you wish to play music
f, you have the wonder'
j exclusive) tone control
jraduola.
ions are priced from $60
uola Models from $135
'iod Styles from $245
Convenient Terms
COMPANY
1 West 42nd Street
OKLYN In NEWARK
>u?h Ave. 895 Bread St.
)H AM
tarn Road
Wr
1 wam 1 Hill I aw 1 ' nf
iURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1921.
At this mc
hundreds of si
."'v ?we ina
money-saving
Here's a new and positive way to
clothes costs. It's common sense; any
the reason for the saving.
The deal covers an order for a suit
coat combined. It's a combination prq
You let us send yotir order for a suit
through our shops at one and the san
tailored from the same measures. One
stead of two; a big saving in labor, det
In a nutshell, we reduce your costs b
?a Suit and an
V at $10 less than oui
CROUP ONE CP
The Feature Values De T.i
$45 Suiting* and $45 O'coalings $50 Suiting
Suit to order $30 Suit to
Ocoat to order $30 O'coat
Total, $60
iCombination Price, $50 Combinat
t -unlimited fabi
?$2,000,000 woole:
-virgin wool t1
[ORDER THROUGH C
11? J 1 A ? iJ J T T_
?t?nu ana ruui Avenue i^in ana un
Columbus Circle, 182
* <Chese ston
NEW YORK CHICAGO MINNEAPOL
i I??????? ??SS
I SAVE 2
I ON YOI.
I BURN THE J
NEW COKE m
A better Domest
Not a single piec
Few Ashes?Eas
Positively will n<
Can be used in a
Makes a wonder
Sold in alt
HI MANHATTAN
I $11-50
Ml I PER NET TON
H8 I SIDEWALK DELIVERY
H1 WM. FARRELL & SON, Inc.
He I RECTOR 1900
I Deliveries by c
am I tricts at partici
md I Coke, its use an
I SEABOARD I
WU I Newark Phone:
J Kearny 1041
mufacturing i
killed tailors a
ncrnrafp a mr
VI XXXV
event for Ne v
reduce your own. We couldn't o
man can see raent9 were already i
store. The saving con
and an over- garment orders for t\
position. Selling direct as
: and overcoat manufacturing plan
>e time, to be rock- But here s a I
t handling in- ?"ote ev?n ,our owl;
ail, overhead. wmter c,?,hes necc
y reducing our
i Overcoat made to
_ x -L_1 1.
C XcUilUUS WXlUiebdlt
JOUP TWO GROUP THREE
ixe Group Banker's Spec
i anJ $50 O'coalingi $60 Suitings and $60 O'eoal
?order $36 Suit to order &
to order $36 O'coat to order
Total, $72 Total, $?
lton Price, $62 Combination Price, $
lIC CHOICE -ORDER ANY COly
N STOCK -DELIVERY IN ON
KRU-OUT -SATISFACTION O
/
)UR FIVE CONVENIE1
iversity Place [Union Square Near Broad
3 Broadway * 202 "West 49th Street [N
u open evenings unlit 9. Others 8:30 A.M. lo 6 P.M.
Dyai Is
.IS ST.PAUL MILWAUKEE AND 10,0'
i
PER
JR WINTER'S
IfOPPERS
seaboard
JOKE
ic Fuel than hard coal
:e of slate in it
y to Handle ? No Sm<
Dt injure your grates
my stove or furnace
fill grate fire
t sizes for every household pt
BROOKLYN
$17.25 PER NET I
JL w ton
IN THE BIN
(Atcor4i?t to Brooklyn Cuitom'
HOPPERS SEABOARD COKE CO.
SOUTH 7291
PARKINSON COAL &. COKE CO. S
STACKS 5266
>ur own trucks in New Jersey subi
ularly favorable prices. For infom
id many advantages, write or phone
3Y'PRODUCT
JERSEY CITY, N. J.
44?* 13
)lant, where
re emnloved I
A 4
/
>st unusual
^ York men. '*
ifer you thi9 saving 1! the gar^
made up, like those in a clothing
les in the making?in making two
le same man at the same timet
we do, in large volume at our
t, a Royal price is always beddan
that enables us to under
i manufacturing prices on your
Is.
v 4~l n.tvjm.
your order
; makers" prices
CROUP FOUR
ial The Gold Medal
ingi $75 Suiting* and $7$ O'coatings
\2 Suit to order $48
12 O'coat to order $48
M lotai, $96
74 Combination Price, $86 I
/IBINATION
E WEEK
R MONEY BACK
SIT SALESROOMS [
way] Park Row and Bockman
ear Broadway]
00 OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS J
CENT I
; FUEL |
IN YOUR IE
HOME
?ton for ton
ake?No Gas jjp
irpose p
BRONX ^
hT5? I
FER"NET TON j ,'.j
SIDEWALK DELIVERY 1
TEPHENS FUEL COMPAN Y, Inc. I
MELROSE 4*00 . 1
irban distiation
on
us direct.
COKE CO. ?j
Jersey City Phone: ;
Montgomery 4120

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