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The New York herald. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, May 12, 1922, Image 12

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12
s1ate1arities?d
ends half century
Celebrate* Foundation by i
Louisa Lee Schuyler in All
l)ay Session.
' HAS CHANGED CONDITIONS|
First Child It Sent for Adop-j
^-t An \f ol.'Ak< 1 /l/lnn^c * iVnvnv
i it'll fianro .1 v ?vjl
Handicapped.'
The Slate Charities Aid Association
yesterday observed the fiftieth anniversary
of its founding by .Miss Louisa . '
T.ec. Schuyler. The day's program, end- 1
ins last night with a dinner at the j'
Hotel Biltmore, reviewed the asaooiu- ;
tlon's half century of accomplishment '
And set the mark for future develop- J
nient of social service. '1
Homer Folks, who lias been secretarv ; 1
of the organization for the last twenty- I
nine years, sketched the lines along 11
whieh the work will be carried, and ! 1
Ttieutioned several definite Objectives. It 11
will be the aim of the association, he i.
said, to secure special classes for all i '
dlfllcult and bac kward children In j'
schools: to have clinics ava'lable in 11
every part of the State for those ap-j1
psrently mentally disturbed or deficient; '
to do away with the remaining two- t
thirds of the volume of tuberculosis as it 1
esisted fifteen years ago and to bring <
prompt and expert medical diagnosis i
and treatment to every sick and in- '
Jured person in the State. I
Mr. Folks said the association during
its fifty years of service had ac- f
coinpliahed six revolutionary changes in '
social conditions. He described these as 1
raving ucrvu ciinini > mc vcim v>
nick, through the establishment of tho i
first training school for nurses at Bell*:- <
vuc In 1872 : In the care of the insane, <
securing their removal from poorhousos
to State hospitals: in the tuberculosis
situation : In the care ot dependent chil- <
dren : In the care of homeless children,
by placing 3.500 of them in carefully
selected families, and in tlie passage of
a model public health law and a reorganization
of the State Health Department.
First Adopted Child.
Tlie afternoon session was devoted
chiefly to the subject of adopted children.
Tho first child the association
placed when it began this branch of
its work twenty-four years ago, Miss
Marjorie Wendell, addressed the association
as a guest of honor. She told
the story of her experience as an
adopted child. "Being adopted," she
paid, "has never been a handicap to mi
cither socially or in business. Two
neighbors of ours were so favorably Impressed
with adoption that they both
adopted little girls."
The parents of children whom they
acquired through the association also !
spoke at the afternoon sessicn. Mrs. j
Philip Thompson told how she and her :
husband adopted first one child and then
another, and how following the adoption ,
of the second a child of her own was ,
norn. ,\u uncc oic fiuai.j
me," she said. N
. Miss Sophie Van S. The;*, superintendent
of the association's child placing
agency, on the subject of "How Our
Otildron Turn Out." said; "Ail of the
t'OO children placed by the association
who are now over 18 years of age are
competent, self-respecting ciMar-t.E. There j
are few- brilliant, personalities among
them, but they have had a? an average j
a better education than the average ,
cj^d of the community." Many "before
and after" pictures were shown.
Dr. John H. Finley, chairman of the
anniversary committee, presided at the
dinner. Among a group of five minute
speakers were William J. Wallin. presi- '
dent of the State Conference of Mayors;
Isaac Adler of Rochester. George F.
> anfield. president of the association,
and the Rev. Robert F. Keegan. secretary
for Catholic Charities of New York
Diocese.
Message Front llnghea.
Secretary of State Hughes, the hon- .
orary chairman of the anniversary, i
sent a congratulatory message in which
he said: "I desire to emphasize by this
personal message my appreciation of
the lasting obligation of the people of :
the State for your splendid reenforce- '
xrent of its charitable enterprises."
Miss Schuyler, founder of the association,
was prevented by illness from att<
uding.
Dr. Finley. as toastmaster, said: |
"Tiierc is no appeal that charity makes
to human sensibilities more poignantly j
expressive than the words. 'Help us give i
n. child a chance.' The State Charltler !
Aid Association has been making this |
appeal for twenty-four years, and It has 1
never gone unanswered.
"We sometimes wondur, because progress
In social work is so difficult, or
seems at times entirely lacking. If it is '
all worth while. Always there comes
some such answer as wt heard to-day
from the charming womanhood and
wholesome manhood that has been d-?- i
veioped from what we once knew as .
helpless waifs of thw streets and tene-1
ments."
The speakers pointed out that the as- j
so< latlon does not consist merely of a'
headquarters in New York, .hut repre- !
s< nts the work of 12,000 citizens In all !
parts of the State interested In health '
and charities, with fifty-two countywlde !
committees on public health, sixteen '
agencies handling dependent children,
nine local committees working on mental 1
hygiene, seventy-six visitors to State j
Institutions, and a stafT of flfty-four experts
In public health, child welfare and
social work.
Among those at the dinner were Miss
lame* Speyer, C. S. Rll*?, Jr.. Felix M.
Warburg. Edwin Gould, Oren Root,
George Haven Putnam, the Rev. Dr.
Charles L. Slattery. Health Commissioner
Copeland, Stanley P. Davleg and
1- wson Purdv.
HE NEVER TAKES HER
TO MOVIES{ SHE SUES
Husband Drunk Every Saturday,
Too, Says Wife.
Mr*. Ha'tle V. Mead of Vonker*
brought Milt In White Plain* y.?tefrtay
for aepr ration from Cheater E Mead of
j . Loeuct Hill avenue. Vonker*, on employee
of the New York Teleptioue Com- i
Winy, (Urging among other till ego that
he had not taken her to the m. x le* In1
. five year*. Thl* la one of tne allcga- i
tlona In the eonudilnt of r.-ucl ut.d in- i
liumar ::Pi>inenf.
S\ Mr* Mead al*o alleged '?-at hit*.
|1 baud comes hnm'' drunk every .?' iturdsy
| night. justice Morarhauaor allowed her
II.". a week alimony and $150 counsel j
? '* lees.
- ? ? r.nnr.vwini
vimacb bam..
The latest l.atln Quarter revrl lo be
civrn by tho inhabitants of Greenwich |
Village. will be held to-night In Turnmany
Hall. The various village characters,
Including those who paint, danre,
slriR nnd write an well as those who
ran never stop talking long enough to
do these things, will gyrate In a costume
hall. Those on the Inside say the
par* will be much more abbreviated
than heretofore this Beason. principally,!
\ of course, because of the warmer
1 v rather, which simply demands it.
\ \
POPULAR DEM AN I
AUTHOR OF 'FAI
Stanley Houghton's lliiullc
Wakes' Under New Name Is
Faultlessly Acted.
VAN'DERBILT THEATER?"FANNh HAW
THORN'' (Hlndlc Wak'ii, ??y .-Uaiiluy 1
Houghton: .
Mra. Hawthorn Miss Louis-' iCmury I
Christopher Hawthorn Whltfnril Kan?
Fa nay Hawthorn Miss llilocn lluUi. u
Mm. Jeffoote Miss Alice B? Inn ire Cliff*
Nathaniel Jeff cote H*u*bc:t ln'sws
Ada Miss Nannie Griffin,
Alan Jeffcote Gordon A*h
sir Timothy Farrar .W titer Kilvm
Beatrice Farrar Miss Hilda Leary
Possibly the managers' distrust of
ihe "revival" led to the adoption of a
new name for Stanley Houghton's "Hln- >
die Wakes." acted Inst night at the Vanierbllt
Theater as "Fanny Hawthorn."
which Is the name of the leading char- j
tcter. This is an unusual honor to a
heroine who does not appear at all dur- j
ing the second act. Maybe It Is by way
sf compensation for her absence from i
the view of the public.
The author of this more or less famous
play has not deferred to the popular
prejudices. He must have known that
Ills manner of telling the story of Fannji
Hawthorn's rebellion would prohibit anywidespread
favor. In the first act the
heroine is introduced to the audience in
the minute of her most abject mortifies- '
tlon over the discovery of her escapade
with the son of the mill owner. Then
she disappears from the aetlon. It is
with the companion of her disgrace that'
the second act is occupied. Of course,
she is the inevitable subject of discus- :
don. But she is not seen again until the i
a st act. I 1
Even her preponderance here prob- ; 1
tbly fails to convince the audience. The i
lero and heroine cannot be in a play ! ]
ike the married couple in the Swiss 1
thermometers, one out and the other in i
locording to the weather. An audi- J i
;nce wants to see its lovers simultane- ; 1
>usly. ! I
There is nothing revolutionary in this i
way of making a drama. Victorien Sar- J
rlou did it so long ago as "Odette," which
is not included in the list of his most !
popular works. Bold as this experiment i
is. It is not the only indication of a t
scorn of the popular demand on the part I
of the author. He makes little or no j i
effort to illuminate his drab fiction with 1 1
the Incidental tricks that may increase <
the poularity of his work. He stood in
"Hindle Wakes" altogether on the side
of naturalness and sincerity.
"Fanny Hawthorn," as the play is ,
VAN<51 mKV PR BP
i v/ii uin i uu i 1 UJUJJ
IF'WIFE'IS JEWESS
Russian Ecclesiastical Law
Automatically Would Dissolve
First Marriage.
__________
Annulment of the marriage of Anas- \
tase Andrelvltch Vonsiataky to the for- | "
mer Mile. Liohouv Mouromsky, at the j
Yalta Cathedral In the Crimea in 19-0. 1
hinges on whether the young woman Is 1
a Jewess. If so. the officials of the !
Greek Orthodox Church here can nullify j
the marriage automatically and tiie
priest who knowingly performed tn-' .
ecjrenvony can be excommunicated, 4
The New York Herald has received
from lta Paris bureau a photograph)"
ropy of the marriage certificate Issued
at the Alcxadre Cathedral in Yalta,
signed by Archprlest Nlchola Vladimirsky
and the necessary witnesses.
The ecclesiastical authorities at the
Russian Cathedral of St. Nicholas In
East Ninety-seventh street, where Vonslatskv
last February married the for- ,
rner Mrs. Marion Ream Stephens, Chicago
heiress, are convinced that the j
document is genuine. They have ret | 1
reived a similar copy with other papers I ;
forwarded by Mile. Mouromsky from !
Paris.
The existence of this document never '
has been denied by cither Mr. Vonslat- ]
sky, who is living in Ridley Park. Pa.
with his bride, or by Mrs. Vonsiatsky'.s
attorney, Clarence B. Mitchell of 40 Wall
street. Mr. Mitchell simply has said j '
that his client has "no other wife livin.T j |
than the woman he married as Mrs.
Stephens."
Vonsiatsky is said to have admitted I
marrying the beautiful young Russian | |
In romantic circumstances. He met her. I 1
so the story goes. In Yalta Just after'
that city was captured by the forces of
Gen. Wrangel There was much feeling J '
against the Jews on account of the I
Bolshevik success and there were fears
of pogroms. 1
Vonsiatsky, who was considered a i I
brilliant officer of the anti-Bolshevik
forces, took pity on the young woman I
and consented to give her a Christian 1
name to save her from massacre. After
the ceremony, it is asserted, Vonsiatsky
immediately left the city and the couple
never lived together.
l^ater. It would appear from letters
which the young woman has shown to
the Paris bureau of The New York
Herald, Vonsiatsky decided to assert
his conjugal rights and wrote several
fervent, communications to the young
woman.
Admitting that the Yalta ceremony
was performed, this does not mean that
Vonsiatsky is guiltv of bigamy, because
according to Russian church law If the
young woman Is proved to be a Jewess
the marriage is void. The church
authorities now are pursuing an independent
investigation of her antecedents,
it Is said that letters furnished to the
church by the Ttussian engineer show
that Mile. Mouroinsky spoke of herself
as a Jewess and playfully admitted
having "fooled the authorities at Yalta." ]
A photograph received by The New
York Herald shows Mile. Moroumsky
to he an exceedingly pretty young
woman, with none of the characteristics
usually associated with those of a
Jewish cast of countenance.
JOHN M CORMACK IN LONDON.
Cnnsnlt* Oprrlnllit, Whn Hn'l?
Throat In tiooil Conilltliiii,
John McCormack has arrived in London
"felling fine," according to a cable
message received yesterday by the
tenor's brother. James McCormack.
at the lattcr'a residence, 2T0 Park avenue.
The singer's inessago sent from
London yesterday states that ho
much benefited bv the voyage and
added that he had railed cn Sir St.
Clair Thomson, a throat specialist, who
ossured him that his throat la In
splendid condition and complimented the
work done on the singer's throat by
the American specialists.
Mr. McCormaek sailed from \>w York
on hoard the Arjuilania, May 2.
JACQIJKH OOtTCKT wishes to Inform his j
select clientele thst contrary 10 certain ;
reports that tend to circulate, he rontlnnes
to be st the. head of his dressmelc
Ins establishment. 21 tint de la I'aia,
Paris.
There has never ham any question
about the sale oK this establishment to
3S? I
TH1
OS SCORNED BY
VNY HA W'
mar 4
HrjKy
M iss Eileen Huban.
:iow called, is quite faultlessly acted bv
the company which AiiRustin Duncan
lias trained. In Herbert Lonuis. who
repeated his natural portrayal of the
Lancashire mill owner, there is a mem
>er or ino casi wmcn originally iinroJuced
the play syme years ago at Ma*ine
Elliott's Theater. Miss Eileen Huoan
illustrates graphically the woes and
triumphs of the mill girl. No performance
she has given in recent years so
lustifies the promise of her early days.
Gordon Ash did the most that any
actor could to make the young philanderer
interesting. Well drawn studies
?f character are furnished by Whitford
Kane. Louie Emery and Alice Cllffe.
Miss Gilda Leary played with exquisite
aathos the scene of renunciation of her
dissipated lover.
"Fanny l-Iawthorn" is one of the most
interesting performances of the^season.
It ought to restore the public desire to
po to the playhouse if anything can.
NORWOOD ACCLAIMS
JAPANESE PASTOR
London Preacher Explains
Australia's AVhite Bill in
Various Aspects.
I ne ? nni> Aiisuaiiii dim wmen nan
stirred up so much controversy among
Japanese statesmen because of Its discriminatory
features was described last,
night by the Rev. Dr. Frederick \V.
Norwood, pastor of the City Temple of
Dondon. as being based not so mueh
upon antagonistic racial as- economic
fear.
His remarks were made at a dinner
at tlie Commodore given to the Rev.
ViAsahlsa L'yemura, moderator of the
Protestant churches in Japan, by the
National Committee on Japanese Relations
in honor of the Japanese prelate's
visit to this city. Many Japanese heard
Dr. Norwood's defense of the exclusion
if Orientals from Australia.
'I*abor is dominant In Australia
through the control of Parliament," Dr.
Norwood said, "and it has adopted a
somewhat churlish attitude toward newcomers.
It must be admitted that it
massed an arrogant act, but not more so,
[ venture to say, than your own Monroe
Doctrine at the time It was promulgated,
which was considered a piece of great
Impertinence."
When sold was discovered in Australia,
he said, the Chinese population
Increased from 3.000 to 50.000 in a few
rears, and the fear anions the native
Australians of an Influx of Orientals
from the Fast became so sreat that antlImmisratlon
legislation was passed.
Speaking of labor conditions in Australia,
Dr. Norwood said that strikine
had become so prevalent. In spite of
labor's domination of Parliament, that
It had come to be resarded almost as a
"national occupation."
Many prominent clergymen and missionaries
attended the dinner In welcome
of the Rev. Mr. t'yemura. as well
as the representatives of various soot
ties Interested in perpetuating tl o
friendship between America and Japan.
Among those who sr?oki wore the Re\
Dr. John Kelmnn. pastor of the Fifth
Avenue Presbyterian Church, and who
has just returned from a visit to Japan:
the Rev. Arthur Brown of the Federation
of Churches, the Rev. William i.
Chnmh.-rlaln of the Federal Council of
Churches and Mr. K. Kumasaki. Consul-General
of New York. George W.
Wiokersham presided.
Dr. Norwood also spoke yesterday he.
fore tile New York City Association ol
Congregational Churches on the subjee'
of "Democracy and Religion." Tin
enuren, no maintained, must not bant
Itself over to any political party, bu
must feel out forever "toward thi
things that are eternal."
Ho said ho believed that the demo
eratlo tendency of the time, the splrl
of solf-doiermlnatlon "which soothe* li
the hearts of men everywhere, and fir
Increased consciousness of men of dif
feronces In conditions of well-being an
all parts of a movement which belong
to The Kingdom of (lod.
"We have made labor the oocnpatlm
of the unfortunate." ho said, "anil tli
doom of the poor. 1 believe that i
wrong. I believe the purpose of Ooi
In not making a complete world, in pro
vldlng for all our n ids. hut hiding thi
materials, wai to hind men togothc
through Industry "
Ink-Inkjj|
and wore ink!
It holds a full barrel
llnKLof ink?because
it has Ho Rubber Sac
' TTre monr'Ious _
Dunn-peN
Th. Fnmnimit IV* ?Sl* iA. liaU M IUF Wsi.J,
At ?n Deslers' ?and np
E NEW YORK HERAL
jSenate Told That
"Queen of Movies'
Is Political Vamp
Ipper House Informed Slip
Has 'Deposed Kings Cotton
and Alcohol.*
Special Dispatch to The New Voir llnullb
New York Herald Bureau. )
Wa.liiiielon, I). May II. (
The motion picture industry Is strongly
intrenched* in polities in many States and
cpenly boasts its ability to elect or defeat
candidates for office, the Rev. VVll
our I*. c rails. supermicnociii 01 cue .*utl'inal
Reform Bureau, to-day told the
Senate Judiriary Committee, which is
holding hearings on the Myers resolution,
calling for a "movie" investigation.
"The vampire c|ueen of the movies is
usurping the place in polities formerlj
held by King Alcohol anil King Cotton,"
said Dr. <'rafts.
"The facts show that the industry Is a
i trust controlled by five foreign men
| using its power as a unit against democracy.
to secure nullification of la ws not
in its financial interest. Wc are having
difficulty in securing enforcement of the
Federal law prohibiting transportation
of prize fight film. The situation would
seem to indicate that the Federal attorneys
are being tampered with."
Dr. Crafts went on to say that the
motion picture industry boasts of having
elected Cox Governor of Ohio, because
i he was not in sympathy with censorship
i agitation. They also hoast, he added.
I that they elected a Governor of Georgia.
. a Lieutenant-Governor of Michigan, a
' Mayor of Rochester, X. Y.. and that they
will Influence every election from Alderman
to the Presidency."
He urged that the Senate Committee
adopt the Myers resolution for an investigation
of the movie industry so as,
: "to drive it out of politics."
The Motion Picture Theater Owners j
' of America, at their convention to-day
adopted a resolution protesting- against
1 any form of ''centralized control" of the
j industry which "would in any way tend
to divert this great agency from the
lines of wholesome, constructive service
now being performed on behalf of na-.
tion. home, church, school and community."
Another resolution adopted declared
, that "It lias been currently reported that
motion pictures are to be produced i
i featuring Peggy Joyce, and. whereas ]
the organization "has always been op- i
, posed to the exploitation of all such j
lines of conduct," the delegates to the ]
! convention "protest against the cxhl-,
| Pit ion of all such pictures, and will not
! permit the presentation of such pictures i
j in our theaters."
Other resolutions adopted provided for
! a vigilance committee to guard against
] "fake movie stock." and suggested cooperating
with religious, educational.
| social and civic organizations.
Chicago was selected for next year's
convention.
| Notes of the Stage ]
V i
"From Morn to Midnight," the Theater
Guild's special production for subscribers
nly. has been postponed until Sunday, May
'.1, although the Guilt did not have to defer
Bernard Shntv'a production stretehltig from
Adam und Kve to as far as thought could
reach. Four performances in all will be
necessary, so the entire list of subscribers
car go away smacking their. Hps.
Percy Moore, who plays the lawyer in "The
Cat and the Canary " and Mrs. Mooic entertained
at tile National Theater last night
the nrv. r<r. Ksrl Holland of St. George's
Memorial Chapel, Charles Stafford, organist
of the chureh. and P. A. Young of Montreal,
all of whom saw thno safely through their
marriage ceremony three years ago.
Florenz JCiecfeld. Jr., will allow Brandon
Tynan to roam through the new "Follies"
j without charge. Tynan, who has always hoen
! a stanch friend of dramatic productions,
turned his ha-k on thein last season and was
; a foil for Will Rogers's lariat In the Zicgfeld
"Frolic:"
Alfrul Goodman, lender of th" orchestra
for "The Rose of Stambou]" at the Century
Theater, seeing that another muslonl director
was the recipient of one large surprise party
on his natal anniversary, went and had a
birthday to< yesterday. Sure enough bis
musicians gave him a .surprise party, even
though he declined to disclose the number of
years he had been waiting for It.
Sinre the arrival here of John Tiller, Fnglish
dancing master. Ills Sixteen Sunshine
, Girls have suddenly got busy arid introduced
a new number tn "Good Morning, Daarip," at
I the Globe Theater, now that teacher has his
l eye 01^ them.
1 Members of Charles Dillingham's "Bull
! Dog Prummnnd" company at the Kntekeri
bocker, having been emboldened by their first
' rllmpse of American baseball, took their first
IK?ek at American ra"Ing estcrday, but negI
lectcd to leave their bankrolls at home. They
j left them at the track, ,-oniing away with
Hip fixed idea that there I* somrthlns: to be
said for baseball, In default of cHrket as regards
expense.
It is pretty definitely settled that Ed Wynn
will open at the Illinois Theater. Chicago,
next Labor Pay. and Chicago can now go
ahead and be happy about It.
I Annie and Kddle Prltei'nrd. child dHnrers.
will appear with the pupils of the Bernard!
School at the 'Princess Theater next Sunday
evening, after havlnit entertained the prisoners
at Slnsc Sing last week.
I "Beyond the P.ocks" with ftloria Swnnson
1 I and ftodolfo Valentino will remain at the
r.lvoll for a second week, and Alee P. Franels,
who plays the father tn this flint and a
priest in "North of the Rio ttrande." the
photoplay with .Tack Holt anil llelie Paniets
coming to the Rlalto, will confront himself
In two pictures next week. Mdythe Chapman
also will be seen double by persons who are
j perfectly sober.
HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS.
' Tra velars'Co.,2(JW.34th.TsI.2472-Penndylvanla.
?
Announcing <
TOMORROW
MA Y-NOVE
i Central Are. I
t1
Engagement I
; SMITH'S IRRES
^ Nick D. Prounis, Managing Propri
-|
flANf F A Mh niNF
?' K?-ii't?H O , TSI'WHmv.. ICrtPt. T' l 'j;i"0^1ryi>n1
THEKNICKERI
ySr Co-appearance a
BASIL DIIRANT and I
For The Opening of
SALL? DE
TUESDAY EVEIS
NIGHTLY THEREAFTER
UonorvHtions B
' HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS.
HOTEL CLENDEN1NG
aiNOi.i; ti-'>e ; knhuii i: $a cp
ROOMS * CP | WITH HA? H
202 W?l 103d Sfe?t
? J
D, FRIDAY,- MAY 12,
PLAY BY DIPLOMATIST'S
SON IS PRODUCED HERE j
'The Weddingby A. W. Pe
zet, Presented.
The Intcr-Theater-Arts Society, a
group of artists, producers playwrights,
musicians and players, whoso avowed
aim is "? more fruitful relationship
between art and industry." presented a
three one act play at 52 Cast Seventy
ighth street last night. They gave an
Irish fairy play, "Shadow of the Moon." I
in which Miss Helen Cahagun, who
dramatized the piece from an old legend
with Miss Alice De Sola, played the
leading role. She is a Brooklyn girl |
vho has already distinguished herself in [
dramatic presentations at Barnard College.
In "The Wedding." a comedietta In a
prologue and an (tpliogue which the
author. A. Washington Pezet vrti of the j
Peruvian Ambassador in Washington.'
Ini.l I" < ??.. II nil I.. M.n
States." a principal character was taken '
by Harry Wagstaff dribble. v\ ell known
j to downtown Broadway as playwright
; and actor. In "Out of the tVest," by
Faith Van Valkenburgh Vilas. the
authoress played a prominent part.
PHYSICIAN'S WIDOW TO
STUDY WITH CALVE
Mrs. Mosher to Go Abroad to
Study for Opera.
Mrs. Juliet Holmes Griffith Mosher. |
widow of I)r. Burr Burton Mosher'and
! Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John S. Grif- I
fitb of 570 Park avenue, has been In
vited by Mine. Emma Calve to take !
' singing lessons at her home In the
! Pyrenees this summer as a result of a
voluntary tryout of Mrs. Mosher's voice
last Monday at Mme. Calve'n suite in |
the Hotel Savoy. Mrs. Mosher will leave |
in June and probably will remain in ;
France until November when Mme.
Calve returns to the Cnited States.
Armed with letters of introduction.
Mrs. Mosher. accompanied by Mrs. I
Grace Marshall Cowden of Brooklyn,
went to the hotel in the hope that Mnte.
Calve would give an opinion of her
voice. The opera singer granted Mrs.
Moeher's request and is reported to have
highly complimented her on the quality
of her voice.
Mrs. Mosher awaited the arrival ot I
SU lilt? iriUIIU? ML LIU* I rnui-ni UI *11111*-.
Calve and sang again. Mme. Calve then
invited Mrs. Mosher to be her gupst dur- i
ing the summer, telling her that she j
would tcaoh her to sing In grand opera,
and Mrs. Mosher accepted. She will be
accompanied abroad by her parents with :
whom she has resided since the death ol
her husband. I
SAVAGE BUYS GERMAN OPERA.
Secures American Kluht* for "The
Inn of Love."
, Sp'cial Cable tn The New York IIerai.v.
I Copyright, 1922, by Tub New York Herai.d.
New York Herald Bureau. )
Berlin. May II. I
| Henry W. Savage, American theatrical
producer, has bought the American j
rights for a light opera now running in
Berlin, entitled "The Inn of Love."
Mr. Savage also lias secured an option
for the American production Franz Lehar's
latest operetta. "Frasquita." which
had its premiere in Vienna this week.
MAY SPLIT FILM BODY.
Tnrmotl in Theater Ownrra' Convention
May Precede Secession.
According to some of those who returned
yesterday from the convention at
Washtngion this week of the Motion
j Picture Theater Owners of America, the
New York branch, as well as ttie Gcor1
gia organization, have made threats to
secede from that body, following the
j (urmoll in the convention which wound
up with the reelection of Sydney Cohen
to the presidency. So far no definite
move has been made, but developments
are looked for in the future.
I New York exhibitors, it Is said, of'
fered State Senator James J. Walker
1 the position of counsel at |12.00t a year.
' the salary which he received front them
formerly for similar work. Walker,
whose friends said they would put his
; name in nomination 'or the presidency
against Cohen but changed their minds
i declined the offer. He told them he was
I through with the industry, but his
! friends refuse to take this as final.
THEATER OWNKR COY VICTED.
I (Robert IT. Rrlnkoff of !>81 Fast
| Ninety-second street. Brooklyn, owner
of the Astor Moving Picture Theater at
Illoomlleid avenue and Itidge direct.
Newark, was convicted to-da.v on a
charge of admitting children un ic-r lfi
to the theater during school hours
Tt was the first case of Its kind ever
tried in TCssex county. The penalty is
$100 fine or a prison sentence. Judge
Cnffery will impose sentence May 2J.
j nr complaint was made by Eocene
i^herldan, assistant supervisor of the
I Board of Education. Brlnkoff testified
; that he did not know of the conditions,
not being at the theater frequently
enough to learn about them.
HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS.
j Travelers'Co.,20W.JMth.Tel.247"-Pennsvivanln.
Gala Opening
MAY 13TH
MBER FARM
lartadale. A*. Y.
Extraordinary of
iISTIBLE EIGHT
ctor?Tel. White Plains 1471 - 1669
J
DANCE AND DINE.
j Kendall Co., T2SM<th av . <2dKt. TV1. VM7D Hryant
IK
way and 42nd St.
NOUNCES THE
nd Exclusive Engagement of
INSTANCE BENNETT I
Tha New Supper Room
. LA LUNE
IING, MAY 16TH
AT DINNER AND SUPPER
ryant 1846-2138.
| HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS.
HOTEL
HAMILTON
The House of Sunshin*
Tirrt St. lil*f of Headway.
HOTKt, t.l CHUNK. 201 Wwl TWIli Ht.
1 IIOI HI. WUXABLl. 70Ui at. & Weil Knrt Av
1922.
ASK HAYS TO CURB
THE SCENARIO SCHOOLS
Millions Paid for Courses,Says
Photo Playwrights' League.
Los ANGELES, May 11.?Scenario writing
cannot be taught according to the
Photo Playwrights' League of America,
which has asked Will H. Hays, who is
termed by the league "the t'zar of the
Movies" to "avert another movie scandal"
by curbing the operation of seen
k In making1 that announcement here,
(ho league states the scenario school
are alleged to be using the names of
numerous prominent motion picture people
in collecting millions of dollars from
picture fans for the sale of their courses.
Will Hays, head of the?Motion Picture
Producers and Distributors of America,
had not received any complaint from the
Photoplay wrights League of America
up to last night. Oourtland Smith, secretary'
of the organization, said that in
any event this body would not have the
authority to interfere with such schools.
ACTOR'S DAUGHTER TO DANCE.
>1 Ism Constance Bennett to Become
a I'rofcNNlomi I.
Miss Constance F.ennett, daughter of
Richard Bennett, actor, will make her
first appearance as a danger next Tuesday
evening at the opening of the new
supper rcont of the Knickerbocker Orlll.
where she will appear with Bast Durant
every evening thereafter at dinner
and supper. Following the family bent,
Miss Bennett has decided on a piofessional
career.
LOEW'S 300TH THEATER.
Sn n I 'm iipIupii llniiMf C'fimiilpfPN
Largest Chain In World.
Marcus Loew will complete to-morrow
the last link in a chain of 300 theaters
stretching front the Atlantic to the
Pacific Coast when he formally opens
in San Francisco. Loew's Warfield
Theater at Market and Taylor streets.
M'r. Loew now owns the largest string
of show houses in the world, his latest
being the largest theater west of
the Floekies. The Warfield is the
twenty-sixth thbater Mr. Loew has
erected during the last year and a half.,
and he has announced recently that
It will be his last theater.
__ AMUSEMENTS.
_____________ AM ERICA S i-OREMO
WINTER GARDEN^
EDDIE CANTOR in "MAKE IT SNAPPY",
With XA\ IIAI.I'KRIN.
4Qvnff nnvatre veST 9? B VAT.
~w w li Phone Circle 3826. Eves. 8:30.
MATS. TOAIORHOW and TIKSIttY.
VANHFRRIIT THEATRE, w.A?th st.
HH UCnolL I Kvn ?;4S Mts W'ed.4Sat.2:45
FIRST MATINEE TO-MORROW.
panny Hawthorn EJ52.y
iHINDI.K WAKES)
ORCH. SEATS pkhkuhmancks $2
>4*^ AtTAP Thra 40th A B'way Kv?m
ffall -S::!0- M?t?.Tom ?ftW?l.
ri" ^Mft vMRs CQBVRN "
I VRir 42d St.. W. or B'wav. Eves. 8:30
U^niU \lntln,Ts To-m'? A Wpd.2::t0.
The Hoi AluslcHl Comedy In Town
BIJOU Tho.-i.. 40th St.W.nf Bway. Evs.8:U0.
Mat*. Tomorrow At Wednesday 2 :.'I0.
5 DOVER ROAD
Ry A. >111.NK, with fiUIC TUPRDV
Dir.of Uutbrle MK'linllc vhA J. UnLnn T
EUGENE O'NEILL'S
"THE HAIRY APE"
Plymouth W.45ih. Exxs. 8:45*
Matinees Tomo'cul & Thursday 2;4t.
I- Stl.WYN TIIKAI KK. \V. tJ at. 1
BARNEY BERNARD and
ALEXANDER CARR in
a now oonn<dy
"PARTNERS AGAIN"
HyMnntaKimtilims&.liiltwKokrrttiotxIman
]'rtr'aEvt2..")O.Mt*W(>dA8att2.N"nlII(th'r.
je?AT
AtAAntfl ST.. W. of B'Y.
Bry. 1564. Ev?. 8:30.
Mat*. Totn'wA WedTheatrea
under direction of Hugo Ricaen/eld
CRITERION M
BeginningTo-M'w(Sat.)2P.M.
The Sensation of Paris
\" Missing
Husbands"
Adapted by Jacques Feyder
from Pierre Benoit's Novel
"L'ATLANTIDE"
A Metro Super-Special
RIVOII GLORIA SWANSON I
?.* "7 >" "BEYOND THE ROCKS")
at Pi M. ICvoll Concert Orchestra
RIALTO "THE BEAUTY SHOP"
Times with Riymond Hitchcock- |
^^i^^^Fainouji^Rhilti^^rct^
a scat ^uptvm-F *f t atuhe films r J
MHMBIIIO. K HtlWAKII .1 KTIIKI VN
kll^^n' ' Doolej \ ^iilrs, Sully A
ril^llyjl loiiclifon. Wflitor'1 Murph>.
ByToau,1 iirrrn A O'Hrirti, (iwlrr A
' tlfin?i Robert t < 0
rrimv 1 ra Gordon
Lrr ^ " 'The Good Provider'
?l fltlOMH \ \l l>KMI I I
MpMMBIvl'N"
M*I]Kl9 n-' >. NoU Ml. Claire Co., Jean
P1*111#] Wl'.H rrlne. nth*.
BfTRTTrl ; 1 IIKI. t I.AYTON in
mt" >) t-J loll Mil III I I N s|
[f.1 JIVil 'I it I - A III It l\ . I 1 4 lirfnrii
|lrarii|Vll Inri-let llrmprl ,Y Co., I'aiRo A'
UXiAUm Chile, utile.,
IPA&K4LEXJ 11,1 VKMA liORIIO\ IP
1 a?sa<" - I II I 1.noli PKOVIIIC,R."
B. 3. MOSS t I'.i rnmld I'irturr. Inr., present.
CAMEO BETTY BLYTHE
^ in "Hi* Wif*'* Hu.bsmT
I ** " H'way > <"ipen P:4.t A. M.?Pop. Price*
An| IIMRI A H'wayl'l'tvnre Pally I Popular
ULUIflDIR x. 47Ml|2 r^(l * 8 30!Prire?
w All-Stminu 1 ; I I.AUK and Met t I.LOI OR
Run Show ( I" "( III 4 KI EH of I92t"
PI A/A I Ms rv~ l!nli"rt* l|tn<
m *\ 'The Gloriou. Fool'with
* aotli St. I Hrli'tiv Cliaile'l' l. - iiUvtMUtl L?U
Price K
Many smart styles
Steamer Travel are
groups where prices
Three Piece
Formerly to
Bright colored ham
materials with blous
Steamer'CoatsPlaided
fabrics and
hair cloths, richly li
:
Country SuitsTwo
piece tailored
diian homespun, ca
: fabrics.
1 Slip-on Sweatei
Of cashmere and in
light and dark shai
trasting borders.
ci I formerh
bnoes?510 to #16.50?
slippers -?oxfords??tr.
56th Street X ^FIFTH A
AMUSEMENTS.
ST THEATRES AND I1IT8. DIRECTION OF .1
I PCMTIIOV Thc;i..6^ C'ent.I'arUVV.Kvs. 8:20
i vCli lUni Slats. To-morrow .V Wednesday
i Tessn Kosta.Jn?.Barton.Marlon Green In
The ROSE of STAMBOUL
' tUIIDCDT Th*'< 14. W. of B y. Ev. 8.20.
onUDC.nl Mais. To-morrow .v Wed 2. <!
FRANCES | TAYLOR THE HOTEL
WHITE I HOMES r?m,s7y MOUSE
rotruuiiru vniairc Then.. 7th A\e..V 4th St.
unCCnn 10nKvs.8:;?i. Mt?.Tomw& Thurs.
Cleverest Comedy an I I I r T r I"V'
| of tllo Season.__ " * .V" ..
i mo Aiioirnrp i^aujiniYig."?Herald
PRINCESS w 3?'-st rtTZ 0579
T RED GERANIUW
A MATS. TOM'Wt WED, jjjg
AATHCT Then. W.ofH'wny. Kvex K:tO.
1 .. MaU. To-mor'w * Thiirn. 2:?0.
^Vfe^inTHE BLUSHING BRIDE
A belmont^.8^;^^;?..133
Fren< hTlioa.f 10.1st time In French
r\ "LA BELLE AVENTURE" ^
Vcxt If C M D V
Monday r\ L In r I (Irani Mlu lirll
Dl AVlinllCP w. 48th Si. Uvea. 8:30.
rLAinUUSt Mm. To-m w* Ttrtl. a-to.
I "UP THE LADDER" w{?g%ff
MAT. TO MORRW,
WW I.AUItK Iv.li.iTt .:c> Mls.Tlin^n^Snj
| M OPO SCO mat? M3tV&svAt^ 58
rue np?VT MVSTEOV PLAV IN TOWNI
unDA DAVCC Thoi 44th, W. or B'way
nUKM Dm i to KvM.sao.Mte.Tom w*W?J
^"rHKs MONTMARTRE
ennTU West 45th St. F.\ 8 .10
/( DUUin Mti.T.im'w & Wed. L':JJ0
Mlliw'i Nr? ( uniod)?THE
12SE? BLAYDS
With O. P. lll:<;<.|K and
A1.F..YA.N l?H A OARIJSf.F
IN K W YORK'S I, E A D T N O T
CUDIDC H'wayA tost iCvrninatiS '(
twrinc Wr'' ' -?
"doris KEANfc "i ""
'the czarina"",,;,,
1 IQPRTV
LI DC.n I I Main. To-nt'w A \Ved. 2:20.
t0 i a ^ii7cfhel*nh,lye,
thelaui to lotto Kru*er
[nm^LYCIUM?r-^5
T.T.TT.ltl hi!7** FR.en.CH]
l)}j t'{^ I OLL'J
BCI ACrn Wert 'I'll s' Kvenlnjpt 8:20
DtLAJMI M hi hi, ,'S 'IVm'w A Thur- 2:21
>lls? I'lrlr's performance as klkl II
hi- mo?t finished piece of tcllns of th?
season."? Heywo<i<l Hnmn.
DAVID HKLAHflO Presents
ienore mirifasloki
Good Horninc Dearie
Musical* 'omrily#*! ADC Kvrs.H 2.'i. Mis
denmiUon .it tin Pli? " 'I AH.it. 2.20
f ACAIETY 82MSSS Last 3 Time'
TV art CAST CT COHAN COTEDIANJ
j ' NAM H. H ARK
HARRIS }v 1' ' "" "A HUGK ?C|
7^T SUCCESS" SI
CORT *,? - WALLACE I
Mil I n s IV ?d in "PAPTAII
;ilift HuHiril.i) :ii .11) ?T I H II
MUSIC BOX i 'Mviisi. urn
W. 4Ath 81. Kv,, N I ft. V
T . U llllam ' oilier. H
T Hephotlt llrj.int I4><) I 1\y rtiiwyrp, l4f>|ly
Mat*. t\ eel. At Sal ] "Host, music
iraMrw|
lOWCRIFFITH'S,;
L_ DOORS OPEN AT NOON
I NOTE:?LILLIAN and D0R0TH1
GISH will appear in
person TO-DAY at
4:30 and 9:30 P. M.
r-APITOI JOHN BARRYMORE
I rtrill/Lin 'NHRRIOCK HOI.MBS
I It'ira* ul .">1 St. C'ayl'i I CI rand Oroh
roSITIVKLV I HIS WKKK OMl.
Vr- I?a
? I'
, 3
t
1
'
Revisions j
for Sports H ear and ;
included among the
have been revised. ;
Sport Suits?
3125 $85
espuns and imported
es of crepe and kasha.
?Formerly to 2125? $85
soft imported camel's
ncd throughout.
? Formerly to 205? $38 ! |1 ;
sport styles of Cana- 1
ishmere and novelty
S Formerly 215?$]Q !
lported mohair wool,
dcs, many with coni
$6.50-$9.50-$ 12.50
ip pumps and sandals.
ftSgSSw ! i;
kVE N U E s S7ih Street
j_ AMUSEMENTS.
jEK ttf. J
TMaxTneEliiotr?^
'wifffd.. jini). I
I Marjorie RAMBEAU m THE GOLDFISH
| With mi.TON I.At KATK.
, I Ambassador Miw/rom~w?W^T:3o
"BLOSSOM TIME'
i ?
RIT7 Theatre Went 48th St. Km 8 :?n
Mats. T?-niorrow * Wednesday 2 -to
The ADVERTISING of KATE
! I AblCAPRP West 4Sth Kt. Uvea. s3B!
LUnUAUHC Mat!I To-mw fc Wed. J.W.
I rwrv "GO EASY
LEVEY MABEL"
with ESTELLE WIN WOOD
nrDIIDI |rThea..42dSl... W.orlt way
nCrUDL|bEv?.g:30. Mix. Wed. & Sat. 2:30
mwrjummuM
rci TlkirCWKST <2t) ST. KVF.S. 8:3(1.*
| til iriUL\[?|. Wed A Wat. 2 10. J
jjl i U U H M! 6yl I yl lu
I AQTU <T Theatre, I Mat*. To-tn'n
40111 SI# Kv?. B;ja I A Thurad.i*
4 The NEST Wi
MAT. TO-MORROW. 2:30. ,
KIK ^2 FULTON
GET5 Ar.th St.. w. of b'w< I
Mate. Wed. A Pat. |
^TeTaLE The 1' VearB
1 West 4tth St. Mats. Tn-m'w A Wed. 2:30
| ?? 1
I ITTI.E Thea.. Sneelnl Tt?e?. Mat. 2:20.
fa.stoievsky .-XII r iniflT Wi'h
; ..vnendotts | Q | QJ K?TEM?
"* -
i Keclon 1(1 Polo. Mnrcaret Mower .I: OWr'I <'a?t
Err*. S :;0. Miil?.rM|FnYWN <lKt5"l.
, To-to.* l h1i. a:.?)l'?IIV,tU'Tol. Hry f.10' k
L . JiIIItjI'JaBaiiliSAZJ
Brondhwr?t.44at.Kv.?:aO.Mt?.To-m.ftThur.
Mh MONTH. I III' Ml SM 41. TRIUMPH
MARJOLAINE awxkm> v
~ _ _ - _ _ 42<1 St. Twlie Dull;
APOLLV :30.Price*SletuI
yy. i ffiltj
; 'Moot Entertaining Picture on B'way'-Tlmr- !
HEATRE8 AND STj'CCB3SB9
NEW AMSTERDAM Rgft xVi$
t!ICO. T. iirovonts
RUSSIAN GRAND OPERA
TO-N'M.II 1. "Eugpn Onrgln"; To-m'w
Mat.. To-ni'w Night,
ronrhkn" iSnow Mafcl^n*. _
Krp. Weok. May 15: Mon., "Riigen One
Bin**; Tup*.. Mfkmon"; Wrd.. T?wr'?
. Krlilp": Thins uSnpBurourliknM: Fri.
j Itnmr": Hal Mat . "F.iicpii
i I Onrgln": Sat. Night. - Horia tloi-ilonnt,"
| CD17CC Woat 42 St. Evening* at ft 2 1
| rHNltt Mala. To-tli * .V V\ "d. 2 _'t>
THE NIGHT CALL v
; EARL CARROLL M;,i
. Joartiti < ??llinrn and l.llllan l.orrnlttn r
|:UI|
i < *:<> .pnilAN THKATKK U'wav. Mi SI
' I m. vunnn Pop. M?I?. w?d. A sat . 2.i?.
11IX\ A it.
? ? month
i RUBICON!
W With VIOI.KT IIKMINti.
- Kill' Krr'torker. B'war. 3Sth Mi
I At?:;iO. I.aat Mat. To-m w 2: <0
"vOTBULLDOG drummond
I | y WlthA.K.Matthrwa. Uat t Time*
!* 4 I I HA4 I MISS
X CYLINDER LOVE'' ??&
EDDINGEK and MARY NA?n
L APPLEJACK" y|{r?,!,y
IUSIC BOX REVUE"
lorenre Moorr. Wlliln tlinnrtt, Joseph Sun I,Icy
Ward, many others. SUijnd hjt llaa?ard Short
show ever made In America." ?Olohe.
I TURNING 'EM AWAY
I FASHION
I EXPOSITION
f MADISON SQUARE GARDEN
LAST 2 DAYS?ADM. 50c.
I liy A Opens Tomorrow
MinA 6 P.M. js-tjst,
PALISADES HBf*PARK
Opp. W. I.(0th ?t. Irrrj. NOW OPKN.
tin Ulcus. JTUaworks. Baud Coot aria.

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