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The New York herald. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, May 14, 1922, Image 14

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14
ITIONS SEEKING AID:
OF II. S. GET WARNING
laifouv Tells League Council
of Danger of Losing
Prestige in America.
MfcLlfcF OFKKK 31 AUK
Arthur I?inglaiul Promises j
Continued Help to 27,000 j
Pussiali Kefugees.
but powers must help
Britain at Once Pledges Third
of $125,000 Needed for Volt
..1 rr.,?
p* vaiiuiuiL i laming.
flontVA, May 13 (As.sociateil Press), i
?j?ord Balfour warned the nations of 1
EtiVope to-day that they would lose
what' prestige they have in America'
unless, in making appeals for aid, they
shl?w some indication of trying to help
tliiwn.seIves. Lord Balfour's warning
voiced in connection with discussion
ny the council of the League of
Xiidions this forenoon of the American
Relief Administration offer to feed
Riflferian refugees in Constantinople.
llhe offer on which Lord Balfour j
based his remarks, employing words :
which plainly startled the council, was
presented by Arthur C. Ringland.
American Relief Administration ropreppntative
at Warsaw. Tt proposed
that, the , -lief Administration con'.inurf
the feeding and maintenance of1
~ L - L _ ,
Russian rrtugecs in uonstanti- !
nopld fi>r four months upon the oondi- ;
tion "that the members of the league |
raise? ?30,000 to finance the evacuation
of itho refugees into Europe at the end |
ofniat time. The offer entails an expense
of $123,000 and is subject to ac- j
ceptance by June 1.
$Mr, Ring-land at the same time an- I
njnmred that the Y. M. C. A. had cabled
*ti oiffcr of $,"?0,non for the vocational j
raining of these refugees after their j
eniufcal to various European renters,
le <{xpialned that the Relief Adminis:jfctl*ii
had detemined It was of no use |
> continue the feeding unlets definite
revisions were made for the future of I
be tlcfugees.
Makes I'le?l?re for Britain.
|3,ord Balfour immediately pledged j
J/eat Britain to give ?10,000, one-third
f, the amount needed to meet the
j jn< rican offer.
i "The l.'nited States unfortunately Is
/ ot a member of the league," said Lord
(flUfpniir in nddrpfiHine' flip onnfpr*?nr?#?
flit it is quite clear that an important
of the American public is deeply
lncerned with the state of affairs in I
:tiFWfr>e.
"America has shown itself ready and I
vllling to assist in restoring the world.
Hitythha: opinion can the people ther;
form of the Europe they ai'e asked to
"i^t if ft turns out that Europe docs
nut find the narrow margin of t'SO.OOJ
tdqed to meet this generous American
i ffigr? The league would not only lose ;
isfe among Its members, but would lose '
h||t ;>re-tige it has in the United .States,
r.d 1: would be one of the darkest blots
n jginc present sad sta'e of affairs in
iCidjope."
:vfr Kingiand is the first Amer'can i.o I
apasar before the council In such an \
ofifcial way. and his app arance there- .
foiv was the subject of much comment
In * league quarters. Me was aecor.'pn(|led
by C. Clafiin Davis of Constan
tl'WPle. who said the Am-oicun Red
("r|fc>s probably would continue Its relief
work thereof the American Relief Administration.
offer was accepted.
The oeuncil officially thanked th
Americans for their offer and promised
to inake every effort to raise the funds '
r ((uirert. Dr. Fridtjof Nansen, th"
league's high commissioner for Russian I
Truer, said America could always b"
depended upon to do its part in such
wdirk.
? Delay Palestine Mandate.
the French and Italian objections (o
lnwieriiat- consideration of the proposltldti
to approve the British mandate for
Palestine made it aeem certain that the
mptter would be postponed until *he
' next meeting. Lord Balfour had i
planned to ask the council to-day to
pitl the mandate on the calendar of the \
present sessions, but Leon Bourgeolfor
France and Marquis Imperial! re- !
l>(trt"d their governments unprepared te
i qfsent to approval of the maw ato at
iijM time.
the French reason for objecting to j
instnediate consideration was that
Fjbnce wished to have the mandate for
S'ma approved at the same time, while
tl* Italian reason was that the whole
nlrstlon had been complicated by the
fMt that the Treaty of Sevres had I
n*ver been ratified.
Both France and Italy cbmplained of j
in'- aurupinees 01 tne Mntisli proposal.
Which had not allowed time for these
Governments to consider the subject.
% league protectorate for Albania vlrtfiilly
was d- elded upon by the council
?lPr afternoon after Italy's objection
hid been overcome.
Italy, through her representative.
Jtttquis Imperial;, had pointed out aev- 1
nal days ago that she could not accept '
IiCh drastic participation by the
C'atrue in the government of Albaniu :
a tout assurances that Important 1
. ,? ban Interests In that country would
j . -safeguarded. The Council Intimated '
ft some of the financial, economic I
legal experts who are to he ap- j
ited by the T.eaguo to assist the 1
anlan Government would be ehosen I
Italy, and thereupon Marquis Im- ;
'"pa if\ withdrew his protest,
"the Council also decided to-day to !
atotolnt some prominent American edu- I
cltor to membership on the Internatjfcnnl
commission, which In to make ,i ;
sfiidy of Intellectual cooperation among
tie nations.
Woman s six rings seized.
lisMonils I.ntuled With Couple Not
Declared, Is ( hnrvr.
frustums officers said they found six
dftgnond set rings In the possession of
>Bn. Malvatnre Mllano. who, with hef
laEsband, was In (he first class cabin
nffthc steamship Dantts Allghlerl, which
locked yesterday. The rings bad not
higpu, declared. the agents said, and the
gt rtff were' held to await a hearing torn
orpow.
.Mr. and Mrs. Mllano are Americans
who live In New Haven. They started
f.^iJtew Haven last night saying they
would return to-morrow to claim the
ring*. Mllano snld he formerly ran a
salAon In New Ifaven. The customs
tpep said a wontsn customs Inspector
fudtijl th< rings when she searched Mrs
AOlnnv- *
B
f \\'
Pope May Leave Vatican
to Take Part in Parade
Hpt< 1(11 Cahlr to The N::\v York Heraid.
Copyright, la.'j.by Tub New York hffluu'.
New York Herald Iturcnu. )
Itome, Muy 13. ( |
PEHSISTEXT rumors continue '
that the I'ope will take part 1
in the great Eucharists i
procession May 21 through the j
streets of Home. It is not cus- j
tomary for the Pope to announce
his' plans in such matters, but by
a change made in the program the
procession will not terminate at St. j
Peter's. This is taken to indicate ,
that the Pope will he among the
marchers, as the new program will '
not permit the granting of the i
benediction from the famous piazza.
LENINE AND TROTZKY
ESCAPED ASSASSINS
Plots to Kill Moscow Soviet
Leaders Now Hevealed by
Secret Police.
Mowow. April 1 8 (Correspondence of;
the Associated Press).?Particulars of
tlio attempts to assassinate Premier
la-nine and T.eon Trotslty in 1918 have
just b^en revealed in a pamphlet which
lias heen published here by M. SemenoffVasilieff,
formerly head of the fishtIng
detachment of the Social Revolutionary
party, organizer ot the attempted
assassination and now an agent of the
secret police.
It was owing to Semenoff's revelations
and charges that a number of
members of the Social Revolutionary
party and other suspect.-, were arrested
and imprisoned by the State Political
Department and also that members of
the central executive committer of the
.Social Revolutionary party are now i
..bout to be tried before a Bolshevist
tribunal. The trial lias been set for
May 23.
The earning trials evoked numerous
protests from the Socialist Party qt
Sweden, of which Premier Brantlng is
the head, and also from the Amsterdam
and Vienna Internationales and Arthur
Henderson, head of the British Labor
party.
Tile attempts to assassinate Lenine
and Trotzky were the signals for the- socalled
Bolshevist "Red terror" which
cost Russia thousands of lives. I.enine
and Trotsky escaped, but two other
Bolshevik officials, M. Volodarsky, Commissar
of Pres.- Affairs, and M. Ouritzky,
Commissar of elections were murdered.
SrmenofT tolls in his pamphlet of the j
military anil fighting activities of the
Social Revolutionary Party In Russia in
1917 and 1918 and denounces well known
persons of the opposition parties, many
of wlic n have he n In the Cbeka prisons
for nearly two or three year*.
S'emonoff says that in the h< ginning of I
1918 it was d'-nidcd to "remote" Lenlne J
and Trotsky in Moscow and <1 E. Zinovieff,
president of the Third Internationale;
Volodarsky and OarttzUy in
Petrograd. It was first resolved to kill
Lenine and Trotzky by administering
poison in their food or by sending up a
physician who would inoculate them with
an infectious disease, fills plan, however.
was abandoned owing to some difficulties
of a technical character
A new plan to kill them by shooting
was arrived at after prolonged discussion
and full arrangements were made.
Both Leulno and Trotzky were watched
for a long time as to their movements
and habits. Lenine was overtaken when
'he left a workmen's meeting at a factory
r utside the town and shot at with |
poisoned bullets by a revolutionary, j
Fanny Kaplan. I
[A bullet recently was removed from j
T.^nine's chest, and the German surgeon j
who pf i formed the operation said an- i
other bullet was still imbedded in the :
The attempts upon Trotzkv failed. 1
He was several times ambushed at the :
Moscow railway terminus at the time of
the departure of his train, but at the j
very last minute lie always changed
his mind and went from a different station
than the one fixed beforehand. One
attempt on his life ended by derailing
one of his trains to Kazan, h. which he,
howiver. was pot present.
Expropriations of money from private
persons, as well as Soviet institutions,
were organized by the fighting detachments
as means to carry on their work.
Their chief aim, however, to prevent
the Germans carrying off the gold pa d
to them by the Bolshevists under the
Brest-Lltovsk treaty, has not been car
ried through. The plan was to derail
the train which carried the gelt' to the
border. The plotters, thanks to the as- j
sistance of one railwayman, made all !
necessary arrangements. For the purpose
of derailing they selected a hilly
spot several miles from Moscow. But !
the engine driver failed to slow down
the train to allow the attempt to take I
place as it was prearranged.
In the summer of 1920. at the tline >
of the war with Poland, Semenoff, the
informer, who at that time was a member
of the minority section of the Social
Revolutionary party, offered the services
of his little group for disorganization
work r.t the rear of the Polish army.
The Cheka helped him to get through
the front, but he was soon arrested, and
under the threat of capital punishment
was sett to th Varsow fortress.
Semenoff then wrote to Gen. Boris
Savinkoff. formerly Russian Minister of
War ami a member of the centra! execu- j
tlvp committee of tlx woclnl Revolution- '
ary party, and thanks to SavlnkofTa in- I
flujrvce Semenoff was set free, this time j
for disorganization work in Soviet Rus- i
sla. In December of 1920, Semenoff left '
Poland for Russia charged with the task ;
of killing Denlne. But Semenoff be- ;
trayed Savlnkoff and Instead of carry- j
lng out his mission he wervt with a ra- I
port to the Cheka.
2H.OOO OFF not.(Sir PAVROLL.
Warsaw. Mav 13.?Twenty-five thousand
Government employees have b?en j
discharged. It was nnnounccd to-day. !
lipon inr rBtwiiMHciiuoiiuii vi ui-j .-nm\Va*te
Commission.
J SMITH'S KNICKERBOCKER
l&Sft SALES ROOMS, Inc.
JJWbmI 825 SEVENTH AV-, AT 531) ST.
?ST PHONES CIRCLE 3614-3615
C. E. SMITH, Auctioneer
FOR A SHORT TIME ONLY
WE H AVE BEEN
INSTRUCTED TO SELL
AT PRIVATE SALE ONLY
In moid ftcrntrliing or marring with th* imc*
?'**??ar> handling of nn nix lion milf,
From Several High-Class
Cabinet Makers
At 50 Per Cent. Less Than
Wholesale Prices
INCLLPING TWIN ANI? ICLL SIZE BHD- i
ROOM SUITES, DINING SUITES IN ITALIAN,
RENAISSANCE. AMERICAN AVAL !
NUT AN I > MAHOGANY. LUXURIOUSLY
UPHOLSTERED LIVING ROOM SUITES, 1
ODD CHAIRS. SECRETARY BOOKCASES,!
EN I? AMI OATELKG TA HI ,KS. OONHOLER. 1
PERIOD MIRRORS. STANDING ANI) ]
TAMLK ELECTROLIERS
A I'ollrrllon of l*er*lnn l(ii(< ami I arprN
IN LARGE AMI SM AI I. SIZE* AT MAS !
THAN AUCTION PRICES.
I lll.r. DELIA LIIIES AT I HUN 23 MILES, j
* I
THE
MEXICO IS SEEKING "
ACCORD WITH U. S.
Washington Optimistic About
Oil Killing ami lfuerta's
Coining N isit.
LA MONT TO OET OFFER
II?? and Morgan to Bo Asked to |
Arrange Payment of South- J
ern Republic's Debts.
Siicrial Df-pat h to The New York HniiAin.
Now York Herald Bureau. I V
tYusliingtoa. I>. May 13. [
Two important developments occurred (
Lo-r'ay, indicating that adjustment of the
differences between the United States
and Mexico is becoming a possibility, j
These developments were:
Reports of a fifth Mexican Supreme
Court decision denying the retroactive
character of Article XVII. of the Mex- .
ican constitution as it applies to oil I
properties. Under Mexican procedure I '
five decisions of the Sutprente Court tire j '
necessary to constitute a precedent I (
binding upon the lower courts. | ,
Receipt of information that the
financial mission of Adolfo de la llu- 1
erta. presumably economic in charac- ]
tor. will have a political nature as
well, and that the Mexican Secretary
of the Treasurey will o.otne to Wash- 1
Ington to discuss the political relations i
of the United States and Mexico with
State Department officials.
Neither of these developments Is final,
but show a trend In the direction of a (
settlement. The Mexican authorities are
assumed to he seeking a way out of
their difficulties.
The fifth decision of the Supreme
Court bearing on the confiscatory nature
of the Mexican Constitution, while it
constitutes a precedent is not wholly
satisfactory. The previous decisions are
regarded as being somewhat hazy and |
the present decision, while holding Ar- I '
tide IT is not retroactive so fer as oil r
properties are concerned, lias no bearing !
upon properties owned by Americans i
where no oil exists.
The conference which Secretary of the !
Treasury <ie la Huerta will have with j
financial representatives in New York ! :
will be preliminary to the political Mature
of his visit to the United States. 1
He will propose a plan for the settlement
of all Mexico's foreign debts, in- 1
eluding default payments. These proposals
will be made directly to Thomas <
W. Laniont as chairman of the international
bankers committee and will be i
along the lines suggested by Mr. Lainont
as furnishing a suitable basis for i
the negotiations In June. ]
From such fragmentary disclosures I
as have been made it appears that Mr. !
de la Hutrtaa will propose that all or i
Mexico's debt be taken over by the New i
York bankers, headed by Mr. Lamont
and the Morgan group, who will under- t
take to pay the Kureopean creditors. t
The Government of Mexico then will ^
propose to make arrangements with the f
New York group for a definite schedule i
of payments, certain specified payments
to be sot aside for that purpose. f
Secretary de la Hyerta willl be nc- \
eompanled to New 1 ork by the under
Secretary of the Treasury, Salvador
Urbika, who will act as chief counsel !
for the mission. Others who will at- !
tend will be Joaquin Sant^ella, an oil | '1
expert; Glallo Rubio, interpreter: Au- |
gustlnoLegorretta, manager of the Mex- i
lean National Bank, and Uodolfo Monies. !
WAR KCHO IN JUDGMENT. I
Seattpe. May 13.?An echo of the 1
Spruce Railroad controversy in connec- 1
tion with the Government's wartime air- '
plane program was heard here to-day 1
in the announcement of a judgment for
$63,710.10 In favor of the United States f
against C. K. Erlc.kson, Seattle con- 1
tractor, and bis bondsmen. 1
KG* .
I?'
Fur Storage?25
eJay-1
24 FIFTY-SEVENTH
Special O
ORES
| for Mc
Frocks of figured
eight distinctive r
for country wear29
A smart model fr<
plain and figured
made over Crepe <
ACk
-T ^
I
A number of su
imported figured (
exceptional qualir
number of Polka Dc
69
About ten Chiffon
type. These drcss<
79
All these dresses are <
&
X&t
NEW YORK HERALD
|
New 'Sleeping Sickness' :1
Afflicts a Churchgoer
DU. WILLIAM CARTER, pastor
of the Throop A\enue
Presbyterian Church. Brooklyn,
reports a novel case of "spirit
uai sleeping sickness." A member
of his church, .according to Dr.
Carter, "went to a neighboring
church, apparently in a daze, thinking
it was Throop Avenue, and
dropped his regular weekly offering,
in a Throop Avenue envelope, j
ih the plate."
"Fortunately," continued Dr. Carter.
"the treasurer was honest and
sent it hack to us." But he warns
his people that their church is at
the corner of Throop avenue and
Macon street, and adds:
"It is generally understood that
some people sleep in church, but
this is the first case of people
sleeping on the way to church."
-/
ZOURT'S OIL RULING
!
r?D4Tirfrc r\Dt>vnr%hi!
VJIl/l J II IjLI J V/Ui%JUVJVyi? I
Umico's President Comments
on Latest Decision.
Mexico Citv. May 13 (Associated !
> ?<*).- Discussing the Supremo Court's
decision on the Anijiaro cases, which ar
mderstood to define article 27 of the !
Constitution relating to the nutionaliza- j
Lion of petroleum deposits, as non-retro- j
active, President Obregon to-day expressed
to the newspaper correspondents
approval of the tribunal's action
and explained his personal theory relative
to petroleum matters.
Subsoil rights according to the President.
have always been possessed by
lard owners in Mexico, when such is
dearly set forth In their title, and the
Government has respected this. But
wlon owners have paid taxes on sur-]
face holdings only then it is clearly I
evident that they renounce their title to '
tic subsoil rights.
Persons who acquired properties
pror to May 1, 1917, the date on which (
:he n"\v Constitution became effective
ar.d denounced the subsoil regulation,
acquired a possessln 011 which they
have paid eorresj?onding taxes and
therefore the Government resiieets their
rights.
Tlie gist of the President's remarks i
was that persons or companies who j
purchased or leased properties in;
Mexico prior to May t. 1917, and speci- j
Tied their intention .1 exploit the sub- ,
soil have a elea title to whatever
minerals or petro.vum is found there, j
whereas, unless a specific declaration]
af an intention to explore for oil, &c? |
was made those products belong to I
the nation.
The President made no declaration |
clative to property acquired after j
May 1, 1917. Asked if Senor de La
riuerta. Minister of the Treasury, was j
roing to Washington, the President re-;
jlied: "I undestand banking matters I
ire to he discussed in New Vork "
President Obregon appeared optimls-1
,1c over the outcome of the conferences. !
laying: "It would be quite unusual if'
vlien a nation wishes to pay its debts !
tome arrangement to that end could not 1
>0 made."
The President intimated that Mexico j
ihortly would recognize the Adminis- j
ration of Gen. Orellana In Guatemala, i
AGAIN FLY 1,200 MILES. ,!
1'v.o Aviators Itetnrn to Texas j
From California.
San AntoSio, May 13.?Lieut.-. L. S.
Andrews and D. H. Doolittle, who flew
'rem Kelly Field. San Antonio, to San
Diego, in less than twelve hours last
veek, arrived at Kelly Field 011 their
eturn flight at 7:50 o'clock to-night,
laving left San Diego this morning.
Unofficially, it was stated that the
lying time on the return Journey, 1,200
niles. was less than on the outbound
light.
*3%
9
1o on valuation
fborpe
1 STREET WEST
ffering of
3SES
mday
1
Crepe de Chine,
nodels. Suitable
-specially priced.
j
50
ock developed in
Georgette crepe,
de Chine slip.
.50
miner dresses of
Ihiffon Cloth of
/; included are a
)t Crepe de Chine.
.50
i robes of a dainty
ss sold at 165.00.
.50
of exceptional value
?
i
^SUNDAY, MAY* 14,
CONEY ISLAND OPENS
SEASON BY PARADE
I
Amusement Kesorts iit Full 1
Blast ? Bathing Beach's ,
Start Will Be To-dav. j
I.una Park ami tjie Steeplechase were j
opened Inst night and Coney Island's
amusement season now is on in full i
blast. The opening1 followed a parade '
through Surf avenue from West Twen- |
tieth street to Ocean Parkway, partlci- i
ployes and led by threo bands, includ- |.
lug Arthur Pryor's Hand. ! j
The Steeplechase has been open on I
Sundays since Easter, but amusement '
seekers had their first opportunity this
year to see the wonders of I,una Park
last night. Admission to the park this
year is ten cents, except on Saturdays
and Sundays, when it is twenty cents, a
reduction from war rates.
V>urtng' the winter the buildings and
structures in buna Pari, v era repainted
and thousands of additional electric
lights were installed.
There are more attractions also, including
a dozen new circus acts and
new shows and several new "rides."
"The Sheik Harem," "Skin, lite Perfect
Woman," "A Trip to China and Monkey
Hand" and Walter Bockwtth's lions and
Charles Weir's tigers and boars are
among the new attractions. A. K. Wallace.
who. managed Luna Park last sen-i
son. Is again its directing head. Herbert
Evans Is amusement manager.
Tlio battling season will be ushered j
In at the Brighton Beach baths this nf- I
ternoon and the occasion will signalize j
the formal opening of the beaches in J
the metropolitan district. Harold Stern's
Band will assist.
Several champion swimmers and point |
winners at the last Olympic games will
be on hand for the opening. There ;
include the Misses Aileen Biggin, Helen;
\\ ainwright, Gertrude Kderle and >
others. Another athletic feature of the !
day will be the continuation of the A. j
A. I*, handball tournament on Bri"gh- I
ton's new courts.
SINCLAIR OIL CONTRACT !
CALLED LAND GRABBING
Independent Producers Appeal
for an Investigation.
Washincton. May 13.--a petition to
the Senate protesting against Government
leasing of naval oi' reserves reeelvdU
from the National Association of
Independent Oil Producer*, was read 111
the Senate t cday by Seria'or La Kollette
t Wis.. Rep.), whose resolution for an
investigation of the least, no y
adopted.
The petition declared that the "delivery
of j ilie naval reserves to the
Standard O.'l-Sltielalr-Dohenv interests
constitutes a return to lis era of land
grabbing ana carpetbr syitig wnoso
uydra head of iniquity v m crushed by j
the policy of President Roosevelt almost i
a. decade agfl. /
W. II. Gray, president of the lnde- I
pendent producers of Tulsa, Okla.. j
signed the petition and advised Senator
J?a Follette that the association had
authorized a committee of oil experts to
assist in the forthcoming Senate investigation
Protests wore made ag-ir.st the policy !
of the Secretary of the I nit riot and the |
Se< retary* of the Navy "if. opening the j
naval reserves at this tlr.v for exploitation"
and especially against the lease
given to the Sincla'.r Interests In the j
Teapot Dome Wyoming dlrtriet.
HOI1F, WORK IN SHOE TRADE. I
Brockton, Mass., May in.?The W. D. I
DouglasShoe Company to-day increase?l [
Its weekly working schedule to forty '
hours. Toe plant has been running oti
a thirty-five hour basis. Improvement |
In business conditions was given as the i
reason for the Increase,
i um
('r*eare
Rc
Development of thi
' its consequent intr<
resulted in a fitti
use?the Radio Cal
compact space a"
graceful proportioi
I welcome addition t(
THE FLINT &
Completely equipp
ceiving Set, and lo
tion; receiving rar
t
A moderate charge
i. t ;,?i\ 5' ^ -1 \
V&4rt iV/TW r; .JU>
pj jj
I . ... ?
1922.
ALIEN COUNTERFEITER |
HELD AT ELLIS ISLAND
Shows Harding Pardon From
Atlanta.
l?na::o Lupo, 45, an Italian citizen
called "Jjupo tho Wolf," who, with
seven others, v.as sent to Atlanta penitentiary
about ten years ago for coun- !
tert'elting, was prevented from landing''
rrom the Dante Alighierl yesterday by j
Ihe Immigration authorities.
Eupo showed a pardon from President
Harding and said that the others of the
band were ut the pier to welcome him :
home. He explained: i
"l returned to Italy last fall to see 1
my relatives, but my wife and four children
are here in New York, and I do i
not see why I should be prevented from (
landing and going to see them." He said i
Lhey arc living at :i3S East 116th street. ]
Lupo said he had arranged witli i
wealthy relatives in Italy?to ship to <
New York quantities of Italian products j
so that he can become an importer and ]
a good citizen. A board of special in- ,
quiry will pass on his case.
FOR ft
Spf
Vei
If the manuf
he did, these
, their regular
. realizes that
woolens and
for us, accor
plete range oi
,OF
This inclm
our entire
priced Imj
tic Topcoa
$65. Sli
Raglan or
sizes, but i
5TH AVENUE, J
SECOND FLOOR?U S
I
' t
isPine
first in fiew
new, bea
idio C
e wonderful wireless telephone i
eduction into the modern home
ng accompaniment for househ
ainet. Not only does it contain
complete Receiving Set, but
is and many rich designs mak
> the furnishings of the living ro
HORNER RADIO CABINE'
(AS ILLUSTRATED)
ied with Westinghouse R. C.
ud speaker horn, ready for insta
ige, 300 miles.
PRICE $325.00
for installation, depending on locatio
CABINET ALONE
(AH ILLUSTRATED)
Including Amplifying Horn
Size of container space for Set, ao inc
13Vs inches high, 15^ inches v
PRICE $122.00
,7. Other period design Radio Cabi
I;'. Iron $99 to |>T^
HECKSCHER FOUNDS '
HOSPITAL IN MUNICH
?
Donates 10,000,000 Marks to I
Work for Disabled Men.
- It
Munich, Bavaria, May 13.?August j
Hackscher of New York, has donated |
10,000,000 marks for the erection here |
it a hospital for shell-shocked soldiers, |
it was announced to-day. .
i
Mr. and Mrs. Hcekseher sailed for I
Curope nearly two months ago, nnd It I
was said at their home last night that
they probably would return about June
1 So far as could be learned they had
ru> Intention of making such a gift wlu
they left New York, or at any rate if
they did they confided their plans to
no one. Mr. Heckscher was born in
Hamburg. He came to the United
States when he was 110, and had $500
In his pockets. lie is now 74 and is reputed
to be one of the largest Individual
owners of real estate In this city.
The most conspicuous public oenefac- I
4EN and YOUNG
iING SU
*y Specially Jt-ricea
$37.00
acturer had not given us the <
suits would be selling at $5C
prices. This is quite obviou
each suit is made of specia
was cut separately and tailorc
ding to our own specification
f sizes?regulars, longs, shorts
-Final Clearance?
ring Topcoat
Formerly $50 to $65
des the balance of
: stock of higher
jorted and Domes- /n '
its formerly $50 to x -C 1 j 1
p-on models with
set-in sleeves?all
lot in every style.
ames McCreery & Co.
E THE SPECIAL FIFTH AV
x? i w " 1 11
Pufoi
vs/^op
( andjbractic
ibinets
and ^ii|lhC
has
old :( S-W/
i iSiofJi
1 ,,
inets | ":A>
i
FLINT QUALITY DEPEI
FURNITURE FOI
DROOM, DINING ROOM AND
tplete displays in this season's
AT PRICES ATTRACTIV1
ED FURNITURE
*lint&HornerG
ZO-26 West 36^ S<
09Convent#nflyiiear Fifth Avenue.''
? -- ^ K
y >
Ion of ilr. and Mrs. Heckscher was in
020 whr-ji they organised the Heckscher
foundation for Children and donated
I4.0fr0.000 to the Society for the Preentlon
of Cruelty to Children for the
reclrion ?t a Children's Institute at
fifth avenue and 104th street. The
mlldlng is nearly completed.
r 1 .J
Moosehead Lake, Maine
SPRING FISHING
Mount Kineo Annex
OPENS MAY 10TH
Rates |4. Bath $5 per day.
Boats. Gt'ldes. Outfit* Available.
SUMMER OUTINGS
Mount Kineo House
OPENS JULY FIRST.
RATES REDUCED
DEFINITE POLICY TO ESTABLISH
EXCLUSIVE PATRONAGE.
Cottages and Camps for Rent
J. W. GREENE, Mgr.. Kineo. Maine.
MEN
ITS |
at
cooperation
I and $60?
s when one
lly selected
id expressly J
>s. A comand
stouts.
I
rs |
75
35TH STREET
rENUE ENTRANCE
*4 ' * ""
(hire
' V'1
,,
. 1
rl
MDABLE
LIVING ROOM
choicest designs
SLY LOW
SUMMER RUGS
?Inc. 1
- " JUi J
)

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