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The New York herald. [volume] (New York, N.Y.) 1920-1924, May 14, 1922, Image 16

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045774/1922-05-14/ed-1/seq-16/

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JDNAS
! 12 East 56th St.
Between Madiaoti tfc ijth Ave?.
? /-. . ti a rrn -a a
Sport IIA'JL'B *1U
Dress HATS s15
SPORT CLOTHES
! STREET and EVENING
DRESSES
*251 P
I Monday?May 15
Tuesday?May 16
, ummm iimiihui
i". ty*, i
t#
i.
? ^
I ~ - ' _ ' ' J * j| :
Maternity Corsets j I
L f!|
I Abdominal Binders | [
i Lane Bryant ir, the largest j{| | j
house in the world selling jj I
'\ Maternity Apoarel daily to l !
f "'{ thousands of crpeciant j
j mothers. (
j I The famous Lane Eryant Corset j
im ./] '* die perfected product of 20 ;
-j 1- years of experience. It if the best j
j corset in the world. Made in our J
so I own workrooms, hence these low ' j
'r 1 prices. ' j
3-95 fi.95 to 14-50! I
; ! Lane Bryant |
ii 26 W. 39th St.?21 W. 3gth St. - I j
JUi' WCSi ^ 5'h 111
lf>H .tno
IP y*"P
L V !
A Relaxed Foot
Gives a Relaxed
Facial Expression
'"She looks as if her feet hurt."
flow often you notice an otherwise
attractive face marred by a tense,:
4j#iinod look.
A woman can't he at her best or look 1
her best when she is bothered bv shoes
bind the foot or do not give the j
arth of the foot enough freedom to
flex as it should. The
; Cantilever
Siioe";"'"
Wo men
permits the foot to maintain a relaxed
f* sition whether the wearer is walking,
' standing or sitting. It is no constructed
... ,,f I fi?>? u m nln
KI". !' ?' - - |
-?oom for exercise of the muscles and
free circulation, yet il fits snugly and j
feels comfortable.
"The arch of the Cantilever Shoe!
bring flexible, like the arch of the
human foot, the foot receives proper
and flexible support, with no restraining
stiffness when walking.
Cantilever Shoes are good looking.
They have the modish rounded toe
aifti the medium h~?l preferred by
xiiost women of today. They give
s^ch comfort?satisfaction throughout
ev'a'ry hour of the day?that there is no
feeling of weariness at night to dull
u' ah evening's enjoyment.
'Why not buy a pair tomorrow and
. U-arn the meaning of real foot comfort?
idths AAAA to E.
I
r?r\ %'ijNcN
Gfftwn hut, 511 )
White Linen, $3.75
Cantilever shoe shops
& W. 39th St., nr. 5th A v., N Y.
414 Fulton St. (orer Schrafft's), Brooklyn
DNf Broad St. (opp. City Hall) Newark
Alao aold by
J. It J. Junhwn, l.exinftan Are., at 60tli St,
L Dv Shire, 440 Coliimbu* Are., at 81 ft .St
A- Arruni, B'way, bet. 89th & 90th.
ri"?cnh?r?er"?, 'ift.T Grand St., N. Y.
O. x. iiC4 lu.rt I'ordham Kef
Mme. Moaromsky
Coming From Paris
to Face Vonsiatsky
Claimant Declares She Does
Not Seek Money, but Wants
Man Punished.
Parts. May 13 (Assoctated Press).?
I The American Embassy Is forwarding: to
t!ie United States in a diplomatic pouch
the documents filed with It by Mme.
Liobouv Mouromsky, who claims to be
the first and only legal wife of Anastase
V.-msiatsky, who was recently married
in O'c United States to Mrs. Marion
Buckingham Rear-Stephens of Chicago.
Meanwhile Mme. Mouromsltv announced
to-day that she would leave for New
York within a few duys "to prosecute
to the fullest extent" the complaint
against tlio legality of Vonaiatsky's
mttriage in the United States wltlch she
lodged at the American Embassy Thursday
"I am not after money." Mme. Moitromsky
declared. "I want redress and
I want thl3 man punished for ruining
the best years of my life."
Mme. Mouromsky. who said she would
be accompanied by her father, is undcrstrod
to have taken passage on the
steamship Rochambeau, sailing from
Havre next Tuesday. While all the
documents in the case are being dispatched
to America by the embassy.
Mme. Mouromsky said she had a full
set of certified copies which she would
take with her. She claims among other
things to have a letter from Vonsiatsky
written before his marriage to Mrs.
Stephens, asking her "not to reveal their
secret and burn up all correspondence."
Mme. Mouromsky Insists she is an
orthodox Russian and not a Jewess, as
si e understood was being' represented to
the ortiiodox church authorities in
A merica.
Special Cable to Tub Xbw York Hkraid.
Copyright, 19!!, b'j Tub New York Herald.
Xnv York Herald Riirenu, )
I'iirie. Mn.v 13. {
The exclusive details obtained by The
New York herai.n of Paris of the filing
of a complaint with the American Embassy
by Mine. Liobouv Mouromsky
charging Anastase Vonsiatslcoi Vonslataky.
now in America, with bigamy,
resulted in her apartment in the Boulevard
Hausstnaim being invaded by a
score of American and English correspondents.
They were received by Mme. Mouromsky
and a Franco-Russian interpreter,
while the young woman's father remained
in the background and refused j
to be drawn into any discussion.
" I want justice, that is all," Mme. j
Mouromsky said. "I am the legal wife i
of the man who is now married to an j
American heiress. Ho has polled the j
best years of my life. X am only 2t j
now and I trusted him implicitly. It is !
for American justice now to cay whether j
his effort to avoid his sworn duty to me j
as his legal wife shall succeed."
The questioners found the family 11 v- )
I - ..f ~ To,-!- '
ment. Their condition apparency aroused ;
sincere sympathy anions iho.-e who for
tlie first time since this international
scandal developed, have been permitted
to obtain a real insight into the life of
the average Russian refugee In the
French capital.
Escaping with only a few clothes and
Jewels from the. Crimea the father and
daughter got to Constantinople. There
Mme. Mouromsky's father bought an Interest
in a Jam factory and succeeded In 1
making a sufficient income to assure a
moderate living for his daughter ar.U
himself. Despite the fact th,%' the output
of the Constantinople 'i.ctory diminished
recently owing to the shortage
of sugar beefs obtained from Bulgaria,
yet by careful saving they have kept sufficient
funds to prosecute their case.
TRINITYANDSTTPA UL'S
DRAW GREATER THRONG
Dr. Stetson Sees Churches in
Wider Service.
Increasing attendance at services in
Trinity Church and St. Paul's Chapel by
the business people of downtown New
York Is reported In th* first annual
statement of Dr. Caleb R. Stetson,
rector of the church, in the Trinity Year
Book distributed yesterday. Dr. Stetson
said:
" i hp opporrumiy jq?r acn icc iu mgj
week flay population of lower New York
was never better."
New Year's Eve. said the report, the
th'ongs at the services were so great
that alter crowding all the pews In the
church the overflow extended far out
to the street.
Dr. Stetson also told of social service
in St. Augustine's Chapel in East
Houston street, near the Bowery. He
added:
"The experiment Is a noteworthy one.
as In the first place It ts a work conducted
by our church dioee?e in a new
Held, that of 'Americanization,' as It
Is sometimes called. It i? an effort made
bv the church to deal with a community
of foreign horn, many of whom
arc unnaturalized, as well as illiterate."
The income of Trinity Corporation In
tin calendar year of 1921 was $1,227, 75.92,
all of which was expended. The
assets of the church were valued at
$14,096,716.15.
BILLIE RHODES GETS DIVORCE.
Motion Picture Actress Snys Husttnnri
Slapped Her.
Los Anokt.ks, Cal.. May 13.?Billie
Rhodes, motion picture actress. In private
'ife Lavitfa Jobelmann, obtained a
divorce here yesterday from William li
Jobeliuann, press agent, whom she
charged with having slapped her, having
been rude to her and with being addicted
to Intoxicants.
Before she was marlred to Jobelmann
she was tho widow of William ^"Smiling
Bill") rarsons, motion picture actor,
who left her an estate valued at $150,000.
Notes of the Stags
i J
Only on" special matinee pe> fornianre will
he given of "The Idiot" at the l.lttle Then'.er.
Tills will be on Tuesday afernoon, with Mlin
ltatello Wlnr.ood. Reginald Pole. Mien Margaret
Mower, Mlsa Beatrice Wood and others
in the cast.
"Kempy." with Grant Mitchell, Txitus Rnhh,
.T. C. N'mttnt, Hlllott Nugent, Ruth Nugent.
Itelan Caraw, Jessie ronimeft" and Robert
t.ra Allen, was presented for the flrat time
Inst evening In the Strand Theater, J,aUewood.
"Montmartre" le to he sent to Chicago
next season hy th" Players Assembly. ""The
Night Call," another of their current productions.
rill he sent to Boston at the same
time. The new season In New York will be
inaugurated by them In September with a
new play.
P. Zlegfeld, Jr., has arranged with SI.
Poltlne, the ballet master, to stage a spec,
tsenior number for the tietv "Follies," In
which Mian Martha Lorber will he the principal
dancer. Mls.i tarlar was premlcie
danseuse last season In Morris (test's production
of "Mecca."
Miss JoFephlnc Drake, now featured In
"T.lllrs of the Field" at Powers'a Theater.
Chicago, will be seen nest season In a play
by Nina Wilcox Putnam.
Barney Gerard has engaged Johnny
Donley for a new revue entitled "Torn
Talk," which Will be embellished with vatldevi
le acts ami play the Bhabert Circuit next
reason.
"What the Public Wants" wl'l run one
more week, when the Theater Cmld'a other
4 iiymIuc'Ioii. "Me M",-n nets Slapped," pill
J i turn to the Garrtck,
I
THE
RUBINSTEIN OPE
PRODUCED HI
Work's Resemblance to 'Faust'
Does Xot Prevent Considerable
Individuality.
By AV. J. HKNDKHSOV.
Anton Rubinstein'* opera. "The
Demon.'' wa? produced at the New
Amsterdam Theater yesterday afternoon
by the Russian Opera Company. This
lyric drama wan introduced to the
woild as long ago as ISTo and the most
cursory reading of historical records
i suggests that it has been dead most
| of that time. The composer for once
! tried to be national in his choice of
: text as well as in his musical treatment,
j but the famous masters of his native
i land were by no means deeply im1
pressed with his achievement.
He had long been regarded as a German
by Inclination and artistic training.
His Tiussianisin was never patent
to the Russians. In "The Demon" lie
took a libretto based 011 a famous poem
of Lermontov, which lg said to breathe
I the spirit of its time, a period of
skepticism and intellectual weariness
In Russia. TheDemon is a being who
represents all that Is base and worthless
In humanity and who seeks to redeem
himself through love. The object
of his passion is the beautiful j
Circassian girl Tamara.
Having made away with her fiance,
lie pursues her after the time honored (
fashion of the melodramatic villain. |
She flees to a convent, hut he follows. !
and although for a moment moved bv
her goodness to spare her, quickly re- I
verts to his evil purpose and overcomes
her, but in the moment of his embraces
lie finds her dead, whereupon after j
the manner of the celestial choir in '
"Faust" an angel announces that rhe
; is saved. The Demon, left without
I hope or love, presumably continues bis
wicked career, and the last picture
shows the blessed demoiselle on her
way to Elvslan fields. '
The inevitable resemblances tc "Faust"
and "Meflstofele" In this work do not
prevent it from possessing a considerable
| and at times impressive individuality.
| The prologue In which the Demon and
! the Aiifjtl discuss what it: to come Is i
1 ure "Meflstofele," and the last tableau
showing the dead Ta.nara surrounded I
by angels of the chorus is "Fuust." And
there Is a prison scene w'th Mcplstophelca
as the wooer liimstdf, for this '
liend does his own tempting.
There are some characteristically Russian
episodes, as in the mountain camp
of the Prince, when a long cUoral number
is sung in the accents of the Greek
church. There is some good n.elody in
the score, but most of it falls between
two stools, or rather schools. it is j
neither essentially nationalistic nor is'
it wholly abstract. Tt has a weak flavor j
of Russianisin with a dash of Teutonlsm. !
The long ensemble which follows the i
"home they brought her wmrlor dead"
scene, that in which the Prince's body j
if laid before Tamam, is \voil written,
and doubtless if heard in more satisfying |
conditions than those of yesterday would
BENEFIT FOR FIGHTING FIFTH
I'rrforninncr to He Glrrn at Times
Square To-night.
A number of persons prominent in tlie
theatrical world have volunteered their
services for the benefit performance for
the "Fighting Fifth" to be held at the
I Times Square Theater this evening,
, among them 1 lie well known musical
| comedy star Miss Nan llalperin. Miss
Marjorie Gaperson, elocutionist, will recite
the poem "The lied Diamond." iledi- '
cated to the division while that unit of
the American Expeditionary Forces was i
on the western front. Miss Sallie Hum-,
tin. soprano: Eddie Cantor and others1
have also promised to appear.
BUNDLE DAY FOR NEAR EAST. |
i Women's Motor Corps to Collect
I lotlilnjr Throughout City.
To-morrow will be bundle day In the
| Near East relief old clothes campaign,
I and for two or three days following, at
various bundle stations In the city, contributions
of cast o(T clothing will be accepted
for shipment overseas.
Mrs. Whitelaw Held, who is actively
Interested In the campaign, has secured
the services of Stanley Sa:kett. superintendent
of the Neighborhood House, 243
East Thirty-fourth street, and a corps
of his workers, to man the relay stations,
at which the clothing picked up by the
Women's Motor Corns at the various
bundle stations will be assembled for
transportation to the warehouse. Clothing
may he sent direct to the warehouse,
foot of Fifty-ninth street. Brooklyn, or
Information concerning the location of
the nundlc stations may be obtained by
telephoning the headquarters of ihe Near
East Relief, Ashland 7180.
Col. Helen Basledo is In command of
the motor corps. Mrs. Philip Klein and
I Mfs. David Dressier will supervise the
I pickup.
i LINER BRINGS FLAG TO VASSAR.
I Gift In A pprrolnllon of Girls* A'Jsll
to Italy l.nst Year.
The transatlantic Italian liner Dante
| Alighieri arrived yesterday from Genoa
and Naples wllh a large Italian flag desj
lined to hang lt> Vassar College.
I The flag is the gift of the officers and
I crew of the Italian battleship Dante AHj
ghieri to Miss Gabriol'.a Boseno, profes|
-or of Italian literature at Vassar. II
I is presented in memory of the visit of
| Vassar girls to the Dante celebration In
] Italy last summer.
i The ship brought 89 first. 2Cfi second
! and 39j. steerage passengers.
ADMINISTERS HILL ESTATE.
| St. Taui.. May 13.?George P. Flan|
nery. president of the Northwestern
Trust Company 01 jm. ram, tu-uuy was
J named by Probate Judge Howard
Wheeler to be administrator of the 116,j
000,000 estate of Mr?. Mary T. Hill,
j widow of James J. Hill.
The appointment wag made on acreej
rnent and petition of the nine lielrr.
i seven of whom previously had sought
aelertlon of the Northwestern True'
Company, while Louis W. Hill and a.
sWrr asked that. T.ouls be iinpoinied.
Judge Wheeler fixed the bond of Mr.
1 Klannery at Sl.000,000.
AMERICANS l\ PARI*.
Special Correr.pontlrrt? to Tin Naw Voss
llNMI.s.
Parts, May 1.?The followlnx Americana
are registered at the office of The
Vain Vorfc Herald of Paris:
From New York: Mrs. Perry Byron,
Master George Tlyron, Miss Therese
Byroti. Miss f'hndot Byron. Clarence K.
Petri, Charles W. Stiache, Miss Hortense
Seurla, Mr. and Mts. L. 13. Spellman.
Miss Gladys B. Spellman, Louis A. Btlrm,
Mr. and Mrs. Perdlnand R. Stlrm, Miss
Lucille 13. Stirm and Mr. and Mrs. E. P.
Truett.
Prom other places: Mrs. Henry Pemberson,
Henry B. Pemberson. Robert
Pemberson, Philadelphia; Walter Jensen,
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. MeGuirk, NewOrleans:
Edward Werner, Detroit; l,eo
B. Sachs, Lawrence. I,. 1.: Eleanor Maddux.
Memphis. Tenn.: Mr. and Mrs.
Mlehalls. Rochester, N. Y.; Acott W.
Ifovey. Philip f. IIuway, Kansas City;
Miss Kate Morasses, Han Francisco; -Mr.
and Mrs. David M. Gattl, Washington,
IV : Mr. and Mrs. John C. Day, De-I
troll, and J It Lanhemhim, I.nj \ngcler i
NEW YORK HERALD,
RA/THE DEMON;
:RE BY RUSSIANS
' ________________________
Miss Nina Koshetz, who sang the '
role of Tamara.
!
liave some effect with a r/iscellaneous !
audience. Yesterday's listeners were '
committed to it before it began, for most I
of them were Russians.
What the orchestration of the work ! j
might be if it were adequately presented ! j
can only be conjectured. There were J
indications in yesterday's performance j j
that most of it was conventional, but I
planned witli skill. It is probable also
that the numerous declamatory utter- j
ances of the Demon would disclose pot- (
ency and even tragic emotion if delivered
by a consummate artist like Mr. | j
Challapin. Jacob I.ukin, who imper-1 .
sonatel the Demon yesterday afternoon, i ,
gave a commendable performance, but 1
he had neither the elasticity of voice j
nor the interpretative Imagination necessary
to si convincing: publication of Rubinstein's
version of the Mephistophelian '
psychology. .
Mine. Mna i\osiietz, w.io has been
specially engaged for I lie New York
season of the company, was tlie Tamara. ^
She sang some of her music creditably
and at all times was sincere and some- ,
times almost eloquent. The other per- j
sons concerned in this opera are inci- (
dentah Even the betrothed Prince
Smodal lasts only through one scene, in 1
which Vladimir Svetioff. who Itnper- \
sonated him. was happily disposed of. ,
The others proceeded decorously through j
their duties, and the chorus, as usual, l
sang very loudly, except in the camp
scene, when it discovered the possession f
of a hitherto unsuspected piano and one c
genuine "straw" bass. t
GKANT MITCHELL IN ' KEMPY." i
J. C. nntl Elliot Viment Authors of 1
New Play, Also In Cast.
Special Dispatch to Thr xr.w York Huald. t
I .auk wood, X. .T., May 13.?"Kenrpy," '
American comedy by .T. t'. Nugent and '
Elliot Nugent, was produced lor the !
first time on any stage at tlie Strand ]
Theater here to-night, with Grant | J
Mitchell as star, and a cast Includ-1
ing the authors as well as Miss j ,
Ruth Nugent as ingenue; Lotus Robb, J .
Miss .lessie Crommett, Miss Helen 1 ,
Carew, Robert Gee Allen and others. j '
The comedy Involves a young woman ;
who wants to live her own life and
carve out a great future, but who is 1
finally satisfied to resume her former I
position as the adored one of a good
' humored bachelor. "ICempy" goes to
the Belmont Theater, New York, Mon- I
dav
!
SALE AT THRIFT SHOP.
Six AVclfare Associations to Share
In Procefih.
There xvlll be a sale all this week at
; Everybody's Thrift Sliop at 114 Kast
j Fifty-ninth street, a permanent store !
! established for those who desire to make j
advantageous purchases at a reasonable j
rate. The proceeds will be divided be- ;
tween the Bryson Day Nursery, the Kips
Bay Day Nursery, the Union Settlement. '
the Maternity f'enter Association, the ,
Association to Promote Proper Housing
of Girls and the Vandcrbllt Clinic Aux;
illary.
Mrs. Rufiis I.. Patterson is chairman 1
of the committee, and among others in'
teresiod are Mme?. George V. Baker.
Tr., Charles A. Chllds, James Gore King,
Chase Mellen, Robert S. Brewster. John
j ITenry Hammond, Oliver G. Jennings,
; Willard Straight. Paul D. Oravath. j
1 Thacher M. Brown. Arthur Rvle.
1 POT.O (MB IS ATTACHED.
' Sax Mateo. May IS.?The San Mateo
; Polo Cl'tlb, a suburban social resort ;
owned by George Gordon Moore, was j
! Invaded by the law to-day for the second !
time witliln two weeks, when an attach- I
| nient was issued against the place to
i satisfy a. judgment for $49,BOO in favor I
! of tile Investment Registry of America. [
p Philadelphia financial house. Among
. the property attached to-day were I
| twenty-five ponies.
JjMCl
19 East 54
Important
LIQUIDATl
By Order of i
The Entire Stot
Exclusive Hous
j GOWNS WR,
SUITS MILL]
FRENCH UNDERW
FRENCH N
Week Commencing
The collection will be offered j
and prod
SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1
Cottages Opened
for the Summer
at White Sulphur
Many Bankers Attend Annual
Meeting of Their Association.
Special ?>;.?patc7i to Tin New York HkialdWhite
Sulphur Springs, W. Va., May
13.?The etui of -May will see the beginning
of the cottage life that is otiu
of the most attractive features of summer
life at White Sulphur. Around
the outskirts of the spacious, rolling
lawns of the Greenbrier and the White, j
set with century old shade trees, clus- j
lers the cottage colony in the famous |
Paltintore, Alabama, Florida and Kansas
Rows.
Nearly all are taken. Mr. and Mrs.
.lames E. Weir of New York and
Charleston have leased one. Mrs. George
Ehret of New York has taken the
Haw ley cottage. Mr. and Mrs. Edward
R. Stettinius of New York, who occupied
a cottage last year, are expected
again. Mrs. Charles Fowler, Jr.,
of Montclair, has leased the Casino
cottage. Airs J. K. Wise of Wilmington,
X. C., and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence
Lewis of St. Augustine, the latter a
nleco of the late Mrs. Henry M. Flagler.
will have the Colonnade..
The annual spring meeting of the executive
council of the American Bankers
Association met at The Greenbrier
this week. About 3oO members
were in attendance, representing leading
banking interests In every large city
11 the country. Addresses were given
by D. R. Forgan, president of the Na- 1
tional City Bank of Chicago, and by
T. J. R. Howard, president of the American
Farm Bureau Federation. A golf
tournament with a men's championship,
several events for women and indoor
JUU uuiuuur cuiucsia wcic ica*
tures of the week. The bankers entoyed
one evening: of water sports in
the pool. At their annual dinner ThursUa.v
night, Thomas B. McAdams, vicepresident
of the Merchants National
Bank, Richmond, was toastmaster, and
Lhe speakers included Hon. John J.
dornwell, Governor of "West Virginia:
Judge Charles F. Moore and Dr. Alexander
Irvine.
Some of those in attendance were
Messrs. Charles H. Sabin, F. H. Sisson,
Flenry Rogers Winthrop, I<\ N. Sheplerd,
C. R. Parker. W. E. Purdy, E. D.
r-uken, W. Fitz Wilson, Frank L. -Hil011.
Theodore G. Smith, James E. Clark,
N. X. Gannon, B. L. Battle, E. W. Kenlerly,
Raymond J. Barttes, Edward
Shefwood, F. C. Service. G. M. Curran,
it. D. Woodworth, Gurdon Edwards,
leorge ]<:. Allen, F. K. Houston, D. A.
Mullen, Thomas J. Hoskins, David C.
Moss, F. D. Brundage, Arthur K. Kuhn.
Li. H. Meiston, and Richard W. Hill of;
New York; Charles L. Sclienck of j
Brooklyn ; M. H. McCarter of Red Bank j
ind Edward S. Bartlett of Atlantic City.
Mr. Jerome J. Hanauer, member of |
he banking firm of Kuhn, Roeb & Co., ;
sr.tertahied Mr. Henry Tatnall, vice- j
>resident of the Pennsylvania Railroad, i
md .Mrs. Tatnall, and Mt. J. R. McAl- j
ister, president of the Franklin National
3ank of Philadelphia, and Mrs. McAl- j
ister during the week. H's guests came ;
'rom Hot Springs in Mr. Tntnall's priv- I
ite car. i
The Rev. Dr. Georpe Clark Houghton, ,
ector of the Church of the Transflg- j
tration. NViv York, gave :i May party a j
'ew days ago for the school children of | j
>ne of the nearby mountain communi- I
:ies, in whom lie is interested. With his
daughter, Mrs. Charles A. L. Strombom,
if Mew York, lie motored to the little
mountain schoolhouse, filling his car
tvith ice cream, cakes, candies and souyenlrs
of all descriptions, and he presided
over the party in the schoolhouse
card himself.
rrvY~i
CORSET
May SAIC l
20%
Discount onaJlStgaiBrModels
615 Fifth Ave.
and
535 Fifth Ave.
V J j
5 nuu^t ^
In addition to our ^
Mourning Specialties
we are showing attractive
Black Hats and
Gowns that arc not
$ mourning.
375 Fifth Ave.
Boston Copley Square WW WW. 1
th Street
|
inouncement
\
[ON SALE
il. n . i
ric tvcceicer
'k of the most
e in America
\PS COATS
[NERY FURS
EAR LINGERIE
OVELTIES
Monday, May 22
it the actual cost of material |
uction. | [
922.
g] Slender
r r?
Jari(
26 West 39PARISIAN
1
Authentic
for StOUt
Latest interpretations
lines. Developed in thf
as the most exclusive sh
I Workmanship an
Prices Marked
Charming A
An attractive collection
Summer Dresses that cmbc
latest fashion points. Dev
Dotted Swiss, plain anc
Voile, Epongc, Linen, Ging
1250 1650 <0 -l
Silk Suits
For the Summer season of
quality Canton Crepe, Si
Shantung, and light wcigl
3975 to 95 ^
Blouses & Overb
Fanciful creations of Free
Dimity, Crepe de Chine, C
Net. Strictly tailored st\
quisitely trimmed.
2-95 29 '?
Lightweight Szv>
Tuxedo and slip-over style
: Silk, Chiffon Alpaca, Shetla
, Fibre Silk, Mohair. All tl
Summer shades.
595 to 49 "
: Extrc
> Created alonp slenderizi
( | Taffeta, Wool
5-95 7-95
I ?
/anc
| ADAP1
FASHIONABLE FO
rHi: STOUT won
ARE IN SEP ARAB
NOTHING IS SO AG
YOUR FEET AND 1
ENJOYABLE AS "FE
ADAPTO SHOES AR
AND AT PRICES TO
MADE ESPECIALLY
PLEASURE TO SEE ri
IVIVAflllV www a w ?tr?r #
onwco in/\i will
Sixes 2 to 11. Jf t
HOS
Made in double extra
Silk; all the leadii
iziri8 Stout App
, eft
- 2JVM
St-SSSSi. 21 Wei
IFFECTS EMPHAS
Summer F
1 Women?
of the modes fashioned i
: newest Summer fabrics in
ops offer only to the slendei
d Materials of HIGH,
at LOWEST Cost of
Tezv Summer
of Cool A charming prcs
idv all the modes in slend
eloped in Gracefully fash
1 figured Veiled Foulard;
ham. Canton Crepe, (
2's? 3500 49
Coats '
excellent Canton and Ro
lk Faille, fcta, Satin, Bro<
it Twills chi 11a Satin and !
39-5
1louses Summ
tch Voile. Sport and dress
jcorgette, Satin, Moonglo
'le or ex- nara, Burr Bai
Flannel, Gabard
4-95
caters Smart
s in pure Various combin
md Wool, dress wear. Leg
le newest Taffeta and Hi
and ribbon trim]
6??
x Size Bathing
ng lines for the stout woman
Mohair and Mercerized Cottc
. OO ro A1'50
t0 3 Caps ar
Qryant
ro Shoes
OT-COMFORT WEAR
IAN AND HER GOOD
LE IF HER FEET ARE C
GRAVATING AS SHOES
OUR GOOD NATURE; I\
ET YOU ARE ABLE TO
E HERE IN ALL STYL
FIT YOUR PURSE; THl
FOR YOU?AND IT 1
THAT YOU ARE P ROPE I
GIVE YOUR FEET A N
'(it/is AAA to EE?$1(
Under the direction of
R. BYRON SCHINDLER,
r service provides a Foot
ocialist to personally
pcrvise your fitting,
upon request. j
IERY to Harmonic
l sizes in T.isle, Silk with T,i
ig shades. 98c, $1.25, $1.
ant
st 38S St.
IZED IN \
'ashions ^
?s to 56 |
' I
y
ilong slenderizing
as wide a variety
: woman.
EST quality
Production
i e Dresses
entation of the latest
crizing Silk Frocks,
ioncd of plain and
; Renee, Roma and
7rcpe de Chine.
5? to 125 ??
& Wraps
shanara Crepe, Tafcaded
Canton, Chinlight
weight Woolens.
1 IT* fv-t
to 163?
er Skirts e
i models of Baronet
\v, Canton, Rosha:r
or Spiral Crepe,
ine.
?o 2950
Millinery .
ations for sport or <
horn, Canton Crepe,
ats that are-flower
ned.
t? 29-s?
ts - 1
Of Surf Satfn, j
)n. ithing
Shoes,
id Accessories
9&#*
Stout
'Women
DISPOSITION
OMFORTABLE. I
r THAT CRAMP
iOTHING IS SO
FORGET
ES AND SIZES, J
pv 7/ i i;r Dppv n
HI II /I r 17 AJMJUl I J.3EC0MES
OUR
RLY FITTED IN
EW FREEDOM.
1.00 to $15.00
r 1
sic l op and All
,65 to $3.95
r iffiil i Wiahl

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