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Weekly national intelligencer. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1841-1869, June 24, 1848, Image 3

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NATIONAL INTELLIGENCER.
tt? ^ ??"?" ~r~rr. ~':ur"7 TT ~ r- r ? -
THE NEW LOAN. *
From the government paper (the Union) of Sun
day |we learn that the bids for the Loan of Si*,
leen Millions of Dollars were opened on Saturday
in the presence of the Secretary, of the principal
bidders, and spectators, in the large entrance hall
of the Treasury Department. The total amount
bid was #30,334,000, nearly every dollar at a
|>remiuui.
" The whole loan was bid for," says the Union,
?? in the name of * Corcoran & Riggs, for them
selves, Baring, Brothers <fc Co. of London, and
others,' at a premium of $3 2-100, the premium
?offered by them above par amounting to 8483,200.
They were the highest bidders for abou 1814,000,000;
the remaining 82,000,000 bringing a premium rang
ing from 3 3-100 to 4 5-100. The total premium
(realized is about half a million of dollars."
To these particulars furnished by the government1
paper, we ire enabled to add the following:
The amount offered at 3 per cent, and upwards
w" $18,341,000
At 23 to 3 per cent, premium 7,116 000
At 2 to 2? per cent. do 1,616,000
?At to ? per cent. do 1,821,000
At under li per cent, do 1,399,000
AtPai 51,000
To,al $30,344,000
Upon this result of the offering for the Loan, the
4Union remarks as follows :
44 When we compare this result with the lou of forty-six
millions of dollars by discounts on the Government loans du
ring the war of 1813, as shown by the Committee of Ways
and Means in their report to Congress of 1830, and the sale
of one and three-<juarter millions of dollars of our United
States six per cent, twenty years'stock at a loss, by discount,
-of 24 per cent, as late as 1842, in time of profound peace,
the premium of half a million of dollars realized on the pre^
sent loau must be a subject of universal congratulation by
men of all partita throughout the country."
Certainly we may all congratulate ourselves that
the Government has made money, instead of losing
it, by this transaction. The official news of Peace
with Mexico, the Union thinks, must greatly have
increased the premium. We doubt it. The fact
of the disturbed state of Europe, under the natural
eflect of which capital is seeking investment in
Government stocks in this country, where it is less
exposed to fluctuation in value, and to possible loss,
is doubtless the governing motive of the European
houses. They, when they gave their orders, could
not know what to depend upon in regard to the
Peace question, then undetermined. They placed
confidence in Messrs. Corcoran Riggs, and that
they acted wisely in the selection of their agents is
shown by the result. The terms on which the
Loan has been taken, so far from being favorable
to the borrower, are greatly so to the lenders. The
premium is not greater than that which the five per
cent, stock of the State of Massachusetts commands
at this moment. For a stock at the same rate of
interest (five per cent.) the Governmeht of the Uni
ted States ought to have commanded quite as large
a premium as they are now to receive on this new
six per cent. Loan.
It is the contractors, probably, therefore, and not
the Government, who are to be"the great gainers by
this Treasury operation.
THE TREATY OF PEACE.
The annexed just reflections on the return of
peace with Mexico are extracted from an editorial
article of the Milledgcville Recorder:
44 For the restoration of peace we offer thanks to
? Providence. To say nothing of the great moral,
4 physical, and national evils of war, war is so un
natural a position fortius young, independent,and
* onward country, that its infliction is to it as the
4 ague to the human body, shaking it and making it
? look blue and to feel vastly uncomfortable, with
4 out actually prostrating it or stopping its ordinary
4 avocations, but bringing great discomfort and leav
ing, in all probability, strong svmptoms of dropsy
? and disorganization behind. We hail the peace of
? the country with gratification ; but not with the
4 less indignation at the conduct of those who un
4 necessarily and recklessly en toiled the evil on us :
4 nor without looking forward with deep anxiety to
4 the evils which are in prospect before us, as" the
result of the war, and which even peace cannot
* obviate.
" J rom 4e conquest part of the business we great
' it- u n no ordinar>' amount of mischief.
4 We shall not, however, at this moment dwell on
4 this topic. The evils we fear will present them
selves soon enough ; indeed, they are already in
4 dicated portentously enough. Our present chief
hope rests on this: that Congress will, for vet a
4 long time to come, let the conquest remain as'it is,
4 and refuse even a territorial government till more
propitious times. This may stay for a time the
evils which even the blindest cannot fail to know
4 threaten us."
WISCONSIN.
The Legislature of the new State of Wisconsin
met at Madison on Wednesday, the 7th instant.
The Lieut. Governor presides in the Senate. N.
?E. Whiteside* was elected Speaker of the House
of Representatives.
Gov. Dkwkv's message recommends common
school education , legal reform ; the erection of a
State prison; the modification of capital punish
ment, so that only the deliberate murderer shall be
put to death; the abolition of militia parades and
musters ; a direct tax, moderate expenditure, and no
repudiation^ river and harbor improvements, and
homestead exemption.
On Thursday, the 8th, Henry Dodok and Isaac
P. Walker were elected United States Senators by
the following vote :
Demos.?Walker........61 H'i^p.?Whilon 53
Dodge Art Collins .23
GEN. TAYLOR IN .MISSISSIPPI.
A letter from Natche* to a gentleman of this city,
under date of June 4, 1848, says: 44 If Gen. Tay
44 lor does not receive the nomination of the Whig
44 National Convention this week, there will be no
*4 contest, not even an electoral ticket, in Mississip
44 pi. With Gen. Taylor we can carry Mississip
44 pi and the entire South."
('iwreriani) Coal.?The Cumberland 44 Civi
lian" learns, by a letter to a resident of that place
from s correspondent in New York, that the Cunard
steamers are using exclusivsly the Cumberland coal.
It was by means of this cosl that the 44 Acadia"
made her recent very quick trip, and we doubt not
that the 44 America" employed the same Coal in her
wonderful passage of ten days across the Atlantic.
Gen. Pikrrf. Van Cortland died on Tuesday
at Peekskill, New \ ork, in the 86th year of his
age, after a life honorable to his fame and useful
to his country. He left a retirement of many years
in 1840 to serve as a Harrison Elector?a Whig of
. the old school, he cast an electoral vote both fOT
Jefferson and Harrison, and was the firm oppo
nent of modern progressive and aggressive demo
cracy. .
THE L?Hh A I' BU11HLHA MAIL.
Referring to the great inconvenience inflicted on
the Public, North and South, by the present unfor
tunate arrangement of the great Southern in ail route,
the /'hilailelphia Inquirer makes the annexed
remarks :
" We begin now to hope that the mail* may be put right
even under the present Administration, and that Old Zack
may not have this, in addition to other reform*, to carry out
ou hi* accession to office. It would be difficult to credit, were
not the fact generally admitted, that the Postmaster General
i? actually paying more for carrying the great Northern and
Southern mail, by a tedious and uncertain water route, than
would be requisite for the moat certain and expeditious land
conveyance. And this, it appear*, i* the case, not because
the railroad and steamboat line between Washington and Rich
mond demanded more, but because tho Postmaster General
insifted, as a condition of their continuing to carry the mail,
that.they should take less than the compensation they had
been before receiving, which (as it appear* from the result)
was several thou*and dollars less than the mails can be car
ried for on the route substituted by him. We trust the joint
resolution reported by Mr. Pearck may pass speedily, and
the communication between the North and tiouth be put on a
proper tooting. At present a letter mailed in Philadelphia for
Charleston require* about four days; it being delayed on its
way (in addition to the necessary delays by the Chesapeake
Bay route) some twelve hours in Baltimore."
The editor of the Inquirer will have seen, as
all our readers will see, that the resolution report
ed by Mr. Pearck has passed the Senate, and we
trust it will now find more favor with the other
House than the same proposition did when lately
before that body, although so zealously advocated
by the able chairman of the Post Office Committee
and other leading members of the House. Mr.
Pearce accompanied his resolution with a full and
lucid report of the case, embracing all the facts,
and snstaining conclusively, we think, the proprie
ty of restoring the mail to the old route on the
terms proposed. /
We learn from the New Orleans papers that a
volunteer expedition for Yucatan is fitting out from
Vera Cruz, and that J. H. Peoples, Esq., late
editor of the American Star, in the city of Mexico,
seems to be at the head of the movement. Large
numbers of our soldiers are volunteering. Another
account also states that the Government of Mexico
intend sending troops to Yucatan, and that our sol
diers are volunteering. The fighting of Americans
and Mexicans under the same banner suggests cu
rious reflections, and the probability of strange re
sults.
The Locofoco* presses and orators continue to
the last to shed "crocodile tears" over Mr. Clay.
It requires some forbearance (says the Alexandria
Gazette) to aee this with patience. But do they
thank they deceive any body by their hypocritical
pretences of admiration for Mr. Clay? Why, if
lie had been the Whig candidate, there is not one of
these "sympathizers" who was not ready to com
mence the work of abuse which they have heaped
upon his head ever since 1828. They are now
realty sorry that they lose the chance.
In the State of South Carolina, as the People
do not vote for Electors of President and Vice
President of the United -States, it will be necessa
ry to hold an extra session of the Legislature to
choose Electors; and it is understood that his Ex
cellency the Governor will convene, for that pur
pose. the new Legislature to be chosen on the 2d
Monday and Tuesday in October next.
" Don't Desert your Colors !"?Gen. Taylor
had a happy way of quieting his discontented sol
diers. Always ready to sympathize with them,
they were seldom backward in lighting with him.
Now and then, however, he discovered a faint
heart; and that, too, occasionally among the best
fellows in the army. The following is an instance:
"Old Zack ard bis Mek.?It is said that the night be
fore the battle of Buena Vista a number of the regular* as well
as volunteers were trying to make themselves soiree. When
Old Zack heard of this feeling among the men he ordered an
old man not scared at triilcs, but who had been found crawl
ing off' under very suspicious circumstances, to be brought be
fore^ hun. 'Why, Borden,' i aid Old Zsck, 'I'm told you
were trying to desert your colors j you certainly are not a
man of that stripe >' ? Well, General,' said the downcast
soldier, ' to tell you God's truth, I was, and am sort of kkeer
ed a little, for they say old Sa&ty'e got' bout 6fty thousand of
the best troops in Mexico, has picked his ground, and will
give the boys here the hardest fight any of os ever did see !
So I thought there'd be a mighty small chance for our litUe
crowd to-morrow, and the best chance for swhile would
b? ?' " Well, you go back to your mew ; things look a
link desperate to-night, but you do your duty to-morrow, and,
if we lose the fight, come and find me and I'U desert with
you/' -
If there are any in the Whig rank* a little dis
heartened. let them take courage, stand fast to their
colors, and "go back to their mess." ?? Old Zack"
never turned the back of his hand to a friend, nor
the back of his coat to an enemy. He is a true
soldier and a true Whi%.?J/tll>any Evening Jour.
The following Letter has been addressed by Gen.
Dearborn, of Roxbury, (Mass.) lo the Editor of
one of the papers of that State :
HiWTSOtll CoTTAOK,
Roxbury, June 9, 1848.
Diar St a : On my return home this evening from the
Forest Hills, I received your very kind letter in relation to the
candidate for Vioe President of the United States, and am
happy to aaeure you that I shall most chwrfully and ardently
unite with my ft*How-citizens of the Native American and
Whig parties in the support of the Hon. Millard Fillmore,
of the State of New \ork, who he* been nominated by the
National Convention la Philadelphia for that important office.
I have had the honor of being acquainted with Mr, Fili
Mona for several years, and do not know any gentleman who
is more entitled to the respect and confidence of the American
people than that eminent ?tate*man. As chairman of the
Committee of Ways and Mean*, during the period he was in
Congress, be evinced an ability as a financier and orator of
the highest order, snd discharged the onerous and responsible
duties of that station in such an efficient and *sti?factory man
ner as to have acquired a reputation as a legi?ls?or which but
few oilier members have attaii.ed nince the establishment of
the constitution.
Of an unimpeachable reputation, and distinguished as a
jurist, as well for his long, constant, and able tflort* to de
velop the natural resources, and promote the Assicclttral,
MrrNASicAL, MARt-fACTvaiRo, and CoMRtaciAL lama
tut of this v*M and flourishing Republic, he it pre emmentlv
qualified for the dignified station for which be has b*?n desig
nated, and truly deserving of the united, determined, and ge
nerous support oi every patriotic citken throughout the
country.
With the independent, gallant, victorious, and ever illus
trious General Zackart Tatlor as the candidate for Presi
dent, and the I <ng-trie<i, faithful, and honest patriot of tm*
Larks for Vice President, there cannot be a doubt but that
thev will be elected by tn'umphsnt majorities
frith great respect, your most obedient servant,
H. A. S. DEARBORN.
Charles W. Em).
SPIRIT OF THE NEW YORK DEMOCRACY
Monster Democratic Mf.etino in Troy.?
1 There was an overwhelming rally of the Demo
cracy of Troy to ratify the nominations of Cass
and Butler, in front of the Court House in that
city on Thursday evening. It is acknowledged to
have been one of the largest gatherings ever wit
nessed in that city, and was characteriied by the
utmost enthusiasm and animation.
rtox tik alhaht jovvhak. or iawidai ivkwiko.
The meeting was large; but it did not ? ratify
the nominations of Cass and Hutler." The reso
lution affirming those nominations wia voted down,
Jour to one!" It seems qnite impossible to ratify
Casa'a nomination, even at a Hunker meeting.
otui i Ainu THE NOMINATION.
We published last week the letter of General
Nlott o| June 3, to the Hon. Truman Smith, of
Connecticut, in reply to one from that gentleman of
the same date. The latter letter, although in a
maimer essential to a proper understanding of the
reply, we louud ourselves obliged to omit, with other
not unimportant matter, in order to procure space
lor the proceedings of the Convention. We laid it
aside, however, with the full resolution to print it,
in connexion with the Scott letter, at the first op
portunity : and we accordingly present them boih
to our readers this morning.?i\orth American.
Wahhikoto-c, June 3, 1848.
General Wiittixld Hrorr-Dear Sir, Being a member
of the Whig -National Convention, which, within a brief
bpace, i? to aMcmble at Independence Hall, in the city of
Philadelphia, [ address you on the subject which is to occupy
the deliberation, of that body. Feeling, a. I do, the urgent
necessity which exists of effecting a change in the administra
tion of our Government, to the end that the destinies of this
jjreat and free people may be confided to much wafer hand#
than they have been or are lively to be in if we fail in our en
deavors at the approaching election, I am anxious that the
proceeding* of our friends at the nominating convention should
be characterized by a spirit of moderaUon and forbearance, and
by au evident determination to do justice to the feelings, mo
lives, opinions, and claims of all. In a country so vast as our
own, with a population of at least twenty millions of inhabi
tant. and with many distinguished public character, well
'kiii tbe P'wideney, it is not surprising that there
should be some diversity of opinion a. to the selection of can
didates to curry out our view, of public policy , nor even that
sectional feelings and jealousies should intervene in ?ome de
gree to mar our harmony and disturb our deliberation.
Among the public character, referred to, the names of
Messrs. Clay and Webster and Judge McLean, civilians, and
Gen. Z. Taylor and yourself, of the military service, are like
ly to come prominently before the Convention j and if either
shall be nominated and elected, then, as I think, our Govern
ment and all the paramount interests of this great people will
be brought once more under wise, safe, and patriotiVauHpices.
In the first instance, I shall, as at present advised, vote for an
eminent civilian?partly to repeat what I underatand to he the
wishes of my constituents, and partly to give expression to the
sentiment more than once announced by yourself and Gen
I ay or, that, in high civil functions, civilian, should ordina
rily be ?elected. But if, on mature consideration, the Con
vention shall become convinced that there i. not a sufficient
certaintyof a favorable result to make it prudent to use either
he name of Mr. Clay, Mr. Webster, or Judge McLean, then
it is manifest that either you or Oen. Taylor must be the Whig
candidate for the Presidency. If the Convention shall deem
it best to bring your illustrious name before the country, there
is no one who will consecrate his faculties more entirely to the
success of the cause than I shall. But it i. possible that the
Convention may think that the name of Gen. Taylbr can be
more advantageously presented than that of any other indivi
dual ; and there are some considerations in bis favor, grow,
ing out of the condition, past, present, and prospective, of the
two House, of Congress, which our mutual friend, the bearer
hereof, will explain to you, and to which 1 attach great weight.
But my principal object in addressing you ? to inquire whe
ther, if Gen. Zachary Taylor shall be nominated, you will
. "ny difficulty in giving him your support, and whether it
is your desire that your numerous and devoted friends, .cat
tered throughout the Union, .hould concur cordially in the
nomination. It is manifest that we can do nothing without
union and harmony; and with them I believe we can put an
end to a domination which has been mischievous to the coun
ty, as it has been f.aught with injustice and persecution to
Gen 1 a_vlor and yourself. With nothing abated of that high
admiration and respect which I have long cherished for vour
character, both public and private, believe me to be truly
your fuend. TRUMAN SMITH.
WASHinuTojr, Ji-se3, 1848.
Dear Sir : I hasten to acknowledge the honor of your let
ter of this date.
I admit and feel all the force of the public viewa you h#ve
laid before me.
Until within a few days, I had not supposed that my name
whs at all likely to be brought before the great Whig Na
tional Convention, now soon to meet in Philadelphia to select
the candidate of the party tot the next President of the Uuited
States.
Whether I receive votes or not in that enlightened body for
'"Sh distinction in question, I shall, as a Whig, feel my
self under every obligation that can bind a citixen to his coun
try, and give to the nominee?whether he be one or other of
the lour distinguished name, with which mine is associated
by you?all the moral influence and support it mav be in
my power rightfully to exert, and 1 ought not to doubt that
all Whigs will be equally patriotic and earnest in the same
gocxl cau^e.
Reciprocating the peronal friendship with w hich you honor
me, 1 remain, my deal sir, fciUifully yours,
u ? WIXF1ELO SCOTT.
Hon. Tkckax Smith, J*c. fcc.
GREAT RATIFICATION MEETING PROPOSED.
The nomination of Gen. Taylor and Millard
I illinore was received with every demonstration of
joy and enthusiam by our neighbors in the State of
Indiana. A despatch from Vincennes puis the in
quiry :? HTien shah1 the great ratification meet
ing take place ? To this our contemporary of the
Republican responds: ? Let the meeting take place
it Old Fort Harrison, near Terre Haute, the
FIRST BATTLE OROUND OF Gen. TaYLOR."
ro this proposition we respond affirmatively,
and trust a similar expression will at once be made
by the W hig papers of Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, Ken
tucky, and Missouri. Let the time be designated
b\ our Whig friends in Indiana, and thousands of
Whigs will resort to the ?first battle ground" of
'he " of the People," there to congratulate
each other on the prospect of our country's redemp
tion, and to mature a system of co-operation that
will secure to (Jen. Taylor as Urge a popular vote
as that which was given to Geo. Harrison in the
campaign of 184(1.?St. Louis New Era.
The Military Court of Inquiry having heard all
the testimony in the case of Gen. Pillow, has ad
journed over until Wednesday next, when General
Pillow will make his defence, and Gen. Scott
place before the Court his summary of evidence.
The Court will then proceed to make up its deci
sion.
The Clay County Tribune, published at Liberty,
Missouri, the place of Col. Doniphan'* residence,
?ays:
" Wb ?*"? 'n "veral Democratic paper, in Missouri
that Colonel Doniphan Jeclinea to be an elector on the Whig
ticket. Here, where he lire*, no Mich fact i. known, and it
i. reasonable to suppose that it would be known here as won
?a at distant place*."
f will not have war !?8uch is the promis
ing title of an article in the Paris .itsemblee Ra
tionale, an extract from which we annex :
" The first step beyood the frontier would be combat s the
fir* cannon shot fired by Franca would be the signal for a
European conflagration , the firet victory woold league the
foreign Power, again* us. !? this the prosperity and social
progress which we were promised ' War! What ! war
before you have gol a constitution ! War as a solution of all
difficulties ! War as an expiation of pa* errors ! War as j
the basis of our policy ! War a. a source of prosperity ? War
as a cloak for our financial confusion ! War instead of the 1
organization of labor! War for the purpose of extinguishing
our credit, annihilating our trade, paralysing our manufac
ture#, and discouraging our agriculture ! War with Austria,
which we attack in Italy, with Russia, which we encounter
in Poland, and with Germany, which will second the two
empire. ! War with England, which has not forgotten the
conquest of Algeria or the Hpaniah marriages ! Without,
useless sucr<*saee or fatal reverses ; within, distress, ruin, and
misery. I. thi. what we were promised > And do we not
here again find the fatal influence of the party rejected by the
National Assembly > And in what a situation doe. this rash
and incapable Government pretend to draw the sword ! No
finances, no preparations, no alliances. Where are we <
whither are we going
The Auditor and Comptroller of the State of Texas are
carrying out the provisions of the law to ascertain the debt
of the late repuMfc of Texas, and have isaed B notice "to all
? person. having cliims or demand, for money against the
, late republic of Texaa to present the sane to the Auditor
, and Comptroller of Ptihlie Accounts on or before the second
, Monday in November, 1849, or they will be postponed '
W Mt rviin WUIABI Al/AUbM I ?
The annual examination of the Cadets of the
United States Military Academy at West Point was
brought to a close last Thursday. la the evening
of that day, at eight o'clock, the officers of the
Academy, the cadets, visiters, &c. assembled in the
chapel, and appropriate addresses were then deli
vered by the Hon. Ashbel Smith, of Texas, the
President of the Board of Visiter?, and Col. A. W.
Doniphax, of Missouri. The whole Board, it is
understood, are unanimous in their praise of the
institution. At the close of the addresses there was
a brilliant display of fireworks.
On Friday morning, at the solicitation of the Board of
Visiter*, there wa* an artillery target exerciae, under the
charge of Lieut. Clark, of Pennsylvania, late of Duncan'*
command in Mexico. The distance of the target was 1,360
feet, and, notwithstanding iho prevalence of high winds at the
time, the target was chattered three time* in twenty dis
charge)*, while shell*, thrown from a mortar, and calculated
to explode at a great aud definite distance, did so with wou
derful accuracy.
The cadets are expected to go into encampment in the
course of a week or ten days, when they will be relieved from
their studies until the first of September.
Xames of Bourd of Visiters.?Mr. Ashliel Smith, of
Texas, President. Professor W. C. Larrabee, of Indiana ;
Hon. Wm. Prescott, of IS?w Hampshire; Col. C. W. Wil
son, of Virginia; Col. A. W. Doniphan, Missouri; Gen. J.
McDsnials, Vermont; Major Patterson Lander, Kentucky ;
Col. A. H. Kedfield, Michigan; Dr. J. li. M. Ramaey,Ten
nessee ; Dr. H. Askew, Delaware; Hon. Dutee J. Pearce,
Rhode Island; Col. Robert Hamilton, New Jersey.
Invited, but did nut attend.?Col. Gadsden, of South
Carolina ; Gen. James Yell, of Arkansas ; Isaac N. Morris,
Esq., Illinois.
Members of the Graduating Class??William P. Trow
bridge, JameS C. Duane, Roberts. Williamson, Walter H.
(Stevens, Andtew J. Donelson, James M. Haynes, Joseph C.
Clark, jr., Rufus A. Roys, Nathaniel Michler, jr., John C.
Tidball, Wlllfcm E. Jones, Edward B. Bryan, Benjamin D.
Forsythe, Janles Holmes, George H. Paige, William G.Gill,
John Buford, jr., Truman K. Walbridge, Richard I. Dodge,
Thomas F. M. McLean, Thomas S. Rtiett, Robert M. Rus
sell, William A. Slaughter, Grier Tallmadge, Charles H.
Tyler, John C. Booth, Thomas K. Jackson, A. Galbraith
Miller, Nathaniel H. McLean, George C. Barker, Ferdinand
Paine, Charles H. Ogle, William N. R. Beail, William T.
Mechling, Charles W. Greene, Hugh B. Ewing, GeorgeW.
Howland, N. George Evans,'Hiortias D. Johns, Daniel Hus
ton, jr., James W. D. Lyon, Geo. H. Steuart, jr.
THE REGION OF MINESOTA.
COllHKSPOSDEKCE OF THE NEW YOBE TBIBI.-JTE.
Falls op 8t. Axthost, Jcjte, 1848.
Will you accept of a short note from a New Yorker, who
has by chance rambled more than two thousand miles from
the great city of Gotham into the wild cold Northwest, the
savage region of ihs Minesota Territory, which at some fu
ture time I supjK)se expects to become a 8tate ' I am told
there are now about sixteen hundred white inhabitants, inclu
ding the half-breeds, in this young and infant territory ; and
the Lord knows how many Indians, rattlesnakes, gophers,
prairie hens, some deer, (wild animals,) but few dear or dearies
that I saw. The forest abounds with wild plums red and
black currants, two kinds of gooseberries, aud thousands of
acres of the prairie are covered with strawberries. About half
of the country is prairie of a rolling kind, covered with many
species of flowers, which in some instances give these prairies
the appearance of flower gardens. Rides on horseback across
these beautiful prairies at this seauon of the year are most de
lightful ; occasionally galloping up a mound of considerabta
height, and the wide expanded sea of prairie in all directions
breaking upon you in the most imposing manner. Nature
has not been sparing in her charms in this far-off land <i
MinesoU, in the way of variety. The mighty Missihsiph, I
even thus far from its mouth at the Gulf of Mexico, a large,
beautiful river, flowing on toward the ocean as the Father of
Waters, sweeping in its way all before it, as the tyrant of
floods, going hither and yon as it pleases. The width and
size of the Mississippi here is quite beyond what I had ex
pected. Seven miles below the Fslls of St. Anthony St. Pe- j
ter's river comes into the Mississippi, bringing in one-thud of
the water which forms the riveT below.
The Falls of St. Anthony arc more beautiful than the Falls
of Niagara, but not so terrific and grand. The rapids above
and below the Falls add much to the beauty of the scene, and
seein to give enchantment to the spot of no ordinary character
The Minesota Territory is settling along.the river and up
about St. Croix Lake quite fast. At the head of Lake St.
Croix is the small but fast-growing town called Stillwater, of
some thirty houses. At the mouth or outlet of the St. Croix
Lake is quits a little settlement on each side ; but I think there
is not much rivalship, as there are no marks of enterprise on
either side. 8ix miles below Fort 8nelling is St. Paula,
where lives Henry Jacks, Esq., who has filled and does 611
many ef the moet important offices in the Territory. He is a
Virginian by birth, fall of life and vivacity, and one of the
early pioneers of Minesota, and will no doobt be particularly
identified with its future progress and history.
FROM VERA CRUZ.
The latest new* from Vera Crua is to the 4 th instant,
brought to New Orlesns by the ship Amf r,ct<
Ths official annunciation of the ratification of the treaty of
peace having been made in that city, the troops which the .
American carried out were not landed and were ordered back.
They comprise 190 recruits for the 4th and 6th infantry, and i
33 others for different corps.
The civil authority of the city of Vera Cru* was delivered
over to the Mexican' on the 1st instant. The American flag
still floated aw the city and castle.
On the morning of the 3d inrtant a terrible state of excite-1
ment wm produced by an accident which occurred in the lower
pait of the city. An awful explosion of powder took place, |
causing the death of from twelve to twenty persons; most of
tiem women. The house in which the explosion took place |
was occupied by forty Mexican washerwomen and tortilla
makers. It was a resort for poor people from the country,
and a supposed haunt of guerrillas. How the powder came j
to explode is not known. Fortunately the accident occurred
when most of the women w?re in the yard washing, or many j
more might have been killed. Considerable damage was d ine ,
to some of ths builJings in the ridnity. At the time of the |
explosion Gen. Smith was only about two doors above the ^
houae, and barely escaped l?ing killed.
There hai been no later arrival from the interior of Mexico. |
REVOLT AT MARTINIQUE.
The brig Columbia, Csptain Webster, which arrived at
New York from St. Pierre, Martinique, on Huntley I set, had
on board as paesen(rertMes*ra. T. B. Duchamp, E. Ituchamp,
L. l>nchamp, F. Craasotis, Thomae Regnal, and F. Deagnrt
to, and thafar families. These gentlemen were wealthy plan
ten at Bt. Pierre, and have been driven hence by the revolted
black*. They fled on board at night, and were kindly receiv
ed by Captain Webeter, who determined to protect them at
all hazard*, the black* having manifested a design to attack
hie ahip for having given them auccor. Thia audden calami
ty hae made the unfortunate fugitive* pennileae.
We hear that tba Mack* were continuing their tnaaeacree
and ravage*, and all who could were fleeing from the ialand.
Many had gone to IVew Orleans, and in some Instances rap
tain* of ve*?ela lying in port bad denied shelter to the wretch
ed fugitives, under fear of being attacked by the rebels. In
one instance TmaYT-atx pertom, including tmmen and
ehildrm, irere driven into a home and bwnt to death, fire
h/wing been applied to the building.
The new Governor of the inland was daily expected te ar
rive from France, and perhap* hie presence may occasion a
favorable alteration ia the lamentable state of affaire. Bu*i- 1
n?a* of all kinde waa at a stand, vessel* were lying In port j
with cargoes that could not be sold, and unlees the Mack*
were aubdued it waa evident the place would be ruined.
The New < >rieana paper* of the 9th instant announce the
arrival there of the magnificent ?teamahip Credent City, in
a run of seven <!aya from the harbor of New York to the I
?eonth of the Mieeieaippi. Bhe had a fresh wind ahead, and .
it was Bometimeo rather eqaallv during the peseaga, but the <
weather waa tpneratiy fair. Her engines worked admirably '
well during the whole way, without the siigbeet accident or ,
interruption, and ahe baa been proved to be one of the finest
aaeboats afloat, running very ateadv, and to the perfect aatis
factkm of all on board. Her speed averaged MS miles m
twenty-four houm, and at timee abe dished through the water
at the rate of *73 miles in that time.
VOTES IN THE WHIG CONVENTION.
rBOK THS II* TO?K COV1I1R A?D LMtlL'IHEI.
Wa publish below a statement, very carefully prepared from
our own notes taken in Convention, of the vote given on euth
ballot fur President by each member of the Whig National
Convention in Philadelphia. We believe it will be found to
be entirely accurate, and will possess interest for I'teaenl pur
pose* aa well ait for future reference ;
Maine.
1st Bal. 2d Bat. 3d Bui. 4 tk Bui.
L. O. Cowan.... Webeter, We baler, Scott, Scott.
L. Severance .... Webeter, Webeter, Webster, Scott.
E. Kent Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
S. Dutton Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
G. W. Pickering.. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
E.W.Farley.... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
G- C. Gatchell... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
James Adam*.... Clay, Scott, Scott, Scott.
W. P. Fe?seiulen. Webeter, Webeter, Webeter, Webeter.
C. W. Cutter..
G. W. Nesbit.
4. P- Hugbee.
1. Colby
J. Kittredge..
J. Godwin...
Everett...
Foote
l. P. Lyman.
[. Cull*
[. S. Royce .
tortus Baxter.
.. Huntington..
Jharkb Allen...
IV. G- Dates ...
H. Kellogg...
Wilson
P. Fairbank.
wrge Lunt....
lufus Choate...
T. Stevenson.
irge Ashmun.
O, Amestjjr
Thomas Nye, jt.
J a*. F. Simmons..
Chaa. Jackson...
A. Bos worth
Thoe. J. Stead...
. J. F. Babcock...
I.C. W. Rockwell..
J. F. Trumbull..
Truman Smith...
N. L. White..,.
J. W. Stewart...
Isunc Piatt
J. W. Fowler...
J. Van Orden....
X. B. Blunt....
A. P. Granger...
L. Fairchild
J. A. Collier....
S. 8. Wyckoff...
H. Hart
J. Fuller
T. M. Foote
James Kidd
I J. 1). Merrill....
C. H. Carroll....
C. Hathaway....
Sam'l Works. ?..
A. Chapman....
W. M. Conkey..
Abner Baker....
T. L. Fax ton....
James Wells ....
Rus?ell Sage
A. 8. Murray....
J. B. Gedney....
H. B. Metca'.f...
J. C. Clark
YV. A. Sacked..
A. Hadden
W. Tyson
I J. H. Bovd
B. Peck
H. T. Eble
S. Schenck.
S. Russell
li. W. Patterson..
D. S. Ciandail...
J. H. Wakefield..
J. L. N. St ration.
Jos. Porter
F. McCollough...
I R. Cornell....
Win. Wright....
T. B. Gauuer....
Samuel Bell
W. F. Johnston,.
J. Lindsay
Henry White....
8. C. Allen
Samuel Ware...,
J. G. Henderson..
Henry King....
T. Haines
T. E. Franklin..
Diller Luther
A. E. Brown...,
8. D. Phelps
L. P. \\ illeston.
Davis Tacgart...
T. M. Bibigbaua.
David Horner...
E. M. Biddle...
James Irvin
F. M- Kunmell..
, Joe. OlUnger ...
Win. Henry....
T. F. Dale
J. J. Pearson...
8. P. Johnson ..
Thoe. White ...
Sew Hamptkire.
Webster, Webster,
Webster, Webeter,
Webster, Webeter,
Webater, W ebeter,
Webeter, Webster,
Webster, Webster,
Vermont.
Clay, Clay,
Clay, Clay,
Clay, Clay,
Clay, Clay,
Clay, Clay,
Taylor, Taylor,
Massachusetts.
Webster, Welviter,
Webster, Webster,
Webster, Webster,
Webster, Webster,
, Websler, Webster,
. Webster, Webster,
, Webetw, Webeter,
, W7ebster, Webster,
. Webster, Webster,
. Webeter, Webster,
. .Webster, Webster,
. Webster, Webster,
Rhode Island.
. Clay, Clay,
. Clay, Taylor,
. Clay, Clay,
. Clay, Clay,
Webster, Taylor.
Webster, Webster.
Webster, Webster.
Webster, Webster.
Webster, Webster.
Webster, Taylor.
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay.
Clay.
Taylor.
ScoU.
Scott.
Taylor, Taylor.
Webster,
Webster,
Webster,
Scott,
Webster,
Webster,
Taylor,
Webster,
Webster,
Webster,
Webeter,
Scott,
Webster.
Webster.
Webster.
Scott.
Webster.
Webster.
Taylor.
Webster.
W ebster.
Webster.
Webster.
Scott.
Clay, Taylor.
Taylor, Taylor.
Clay, Taylor.
Clay, Taylor.
Connecticut.
Clay, Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
New York.
Clay, Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Scott,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Scott,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Scott,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Scott,
Clay,
Scott, Scott,
Clay, Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Webster, Webster,
Clay, Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clsy,
Clay,
8cott,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Taylor,
Scott,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
?Clay,
J. R MeFee....
N. B. Smitbers .
John Wales....
Thos. G. Pratt .
J. C. (Jroome...
D. Jenifer
Geo. Schley....
Wm. E- Coale..
G. Richardson..
L. Tilghman ...
8. Hamblelon, jr.
Clayton, Clayton,
Scott, Scott,
New Jtrtry.
Clay, Clay,
Taylor, Taylor,
Taylor, Taylor,
Taylor, Taylor,
Clay, Clay,
Clay, Clay,
Clay, Clay,
Penntylnmia.
Taylor, Taylor,
Scott, Scott,
Taylor, Taylor,
Clay, Clay,
Cjay, Clay,
C?ay, Cby,
Clay, Clay,
Taylor, Taylor,
Clay, Scott,
Clay, Clay,
Taylor, Taylor,
Taylor, Taylor, 1
CWy, Clay,
Clay, Scott,
Clay, Taylor,
Scott, Sooit,
Scott, Scott,
Taylor, Taylor,
Scott, Scott,
Taylor, Taylor,
Scott, Scott,
Clay, Scott,
Clay, Clay,
Scott, Scott,
Clay, Scott,
Taylor, Taylor,
DeUnrare.
Clayton, Clayton,
Clayton, Clayton,
Clayton, Clayton,
Maryland.
Cl?y, Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Taylor,
Taylor,
Clay,
Taylor,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Scott,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Scott,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Taylor,
Scott,
Clay,
Clay,
Scott,
Clay,
Clay,
Taylor,
, Clay,
Scoli,
Scott,
Taylor,
Taylor,
Taylor,
Taylor,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Taylor,
Scott,
Taylor,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Scott,
Taylor,
Scott,
Taylor,
Tavlor,
Taylor,
Taylor,
Taylor,
Taylor,
Scott,
Scott,
Taylor,
Scott,
Taylor,
8cott,
Scott,
Clay,
Scott,
Scott,
Taylor,
Clay.
Clay.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Clay.
Taylor.
Clay.
Scott.
Clay.
Clay.
Scott.
Clay.
Scott.
Scott.
Clay.
Clay.
Scott.
Clay.
Clay.
Scott.
Scott.
Scott.
Taylor.
Scott.
Taylor.
Scott.
Clay.
Clay.
Clay.
Clay
Clay.
Taylor.
Scutt.
Clay.
Clay.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Clay.
Taylor.
Scott.
ScoU.
Scott.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Clay.
Clav.
Clay.
Taylor.
Scott.
Taylor.
Clay.
Clay.
Clay.
Scott.
Tavlor.
Scott.
| Taylor.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Scott.
Scott.
Taylor.
Scott.
Taylor.
ScoU.
Scott.
Clay.
Scott.
Scott.
Taylor.
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clay,
Clayton,
Scott,
Taylor,
Taylor,
Clay,
Clay,
Clav,
Clay,
Taylor,
Clay,
Taylor,
Taylw.
Scott.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Taylor.
Taylor.
I irginia.
E. B Hick* Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
W. 8. Archer... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
V. \V. Houthall.. Clay, Clay, Clay, Taylor.
J >bn Janney Clay, Clay, Clay, Clay.
M. Uarnett, jr.... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
J. F. Walla...;. Taylor, Taylor, , Taylor, Taylor.
Robert Allon..... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
E. P. Hunter.... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
T. 8. Flaamoy... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
A T. Caperton... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
W. B. Prcatoa... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
B. R. Johnaton. . Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Carter Bastoa Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
E. C. Wjlaoo.... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Hill Carter Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Win. Heymour.. ? Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
W. P. Rathbun.. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor," Taylor.
iVor/A Carolina.
O.W.Haywood.. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
O. H. WiHy.... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
N. L. WUliam* . Clay, Clay, Scott, Taylor.
Wm. Wafcar.... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
J- M. Moivbratl.. Clay, Clar, Clay, Clay.
N. Woodfui Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
1>. B. Raker Clay, Clay, . Taylor, Taylor.
Kdward 8tanl v .. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
David Oatlaw.... Clay, Clay, Clay, Taylor.
Ed IVberry Clay, Clay, Clay, Taylor.
John Kan Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
South Carolina.
E.Oamage. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
DeorgtS. Bryan. Clay, Clay, Clay, Clay.
Georgia.
G. W. Crawford. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Merriwetber Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
T.B.King Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
E. O. CaUneaa.,. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
N G. Poater... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
W. Boynton Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
W. Y. HanaaU... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
R. D. Moore Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Toy lor.
L. J. GabaU..... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
W W. Clark.... TayJor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
H. W. Hilliard.. Ttylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taykf.
C. C. 1-angduo,.. Clay, Clay, Clw, Clay.
R. W. Walker..Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.'
R. O. Picket..... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
H. V. (Smith Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
J. W. Baldwin.., Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
JohuGayle Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Mississippi.
H. P. Duncomb.. Taylor, Tuylor, Tayler, Taylor.
J- P- P?7<* Taylor, Taylor, T?ylor, Taylor.
P. W. Tompkins.. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
JameaDuproo ... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
JauieaMetcalf.... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
T. J. Johuaon.... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, , Taylor.
Luuiuaug.
L. Soondera Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, 1>ylor.
C. Bullitt Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
8. J Peter. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
C. M. Conrad... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
G. B. Duncan .., Clay, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
B.Wtncheater. ..I Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Ohio.
John Shorman. J. Scot', Scott, Scott, 8cott.
Joseph Vance.. j. Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott!
John Sloan Clay, Clay, Clay, Clay.
L'Homedieu j. Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott.
L- D. Campbell f. 8cott, Scott, Scott, ScotU
B. Stanton ...... Scott, 8cott, Scott, 8cott.
R. P. Duck land;.. Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott.
H. L. Penn...;.. Scott, Scott, Scott, ScotU
8. GallowayScott, Scott, 8cott, Scott.
James ColUer,'... Scott, 8cott, Scott, Scott.
W. L. Perkini... Scott, ScoU, Scott, Scott.
H. B. Hurlbtu... Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott.
J. A. Binghajfc... Scctt, Scott, 8cott, Scott.
John Davengbrt.. McLean, Scott, Scott, Scott,
Samuel Bigger... Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott.
D. R. Tilden Scott, Scott, Scott, 8cott.
Nathan Guim.... Scott, Scotl, 8cott, Scott.
H. Dcviaonj Scott, Scott, Scott, 8cott.
Peter Odlirv Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott.
Ed. Hamilton Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
V. Riche./ Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott.
V. B. Horton Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott.
John Cochran Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott.
Kentucky.
Robt. Mallory.... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
G. T. Wood Clay, Clay, Clay, Taylor.
W. R. Griffith ... Clay, Clay, Cl?y, Taylor.
J. A. McClung.... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
L. Beard Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
J. A. Jackson.... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
J.W. Haya Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
B. F. Bedinjrer... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
J. B. Houston... . Clay, Clay, Clay, Taylor.
L. B. Husbands.. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
James Campbell.. Clay, Clay, Clay, Taylor.
James Harlan,... Clay, Clay, Clay, Clay.
Tennessee.
T. C. Bran*ford. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
T. E. Whiteside. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Wm. M.Cocke.. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, ' Taylor.
M. P. Gentry Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
E. H. Ewing Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
G. A. Henry.... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
W. G. Roadman. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
' T. M. Vandyke.. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
John Bell Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
W. B. Rrese Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
John A. Crozier.. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
A. M. Ballentine. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
W. T. Haskell... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Indiana.
J. D. Defrees Scott, Scott, 8cott, ScotU
John Beard Scott, ScoU, Scott, Scott.
F. Boyd. Scott, Scott, Taylor, Taylor.
Milton Stapp.... Taylor, Tuylor,- Taylor, Taylor.
E. Conwell Scott, Scott, Scott, Taylor.
S.Meredith...... Clay, Clay, Clay, Clay.
M. M. Ray ScoU, Scott, Scott, Taylor.
J *. Warner Clay, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Daniel Sigler.... Scott, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
R. C. Gregory... Scott, Scott, Scott, ScotU
D. G. Rom Scott, Scott, Taylor, Taylor.
G. W. Ewing... Scott, Scott, ScoU, ScotU
Illinois.
9. Lisle Smith.. Clay, Clay, City, Taylor.
M. P. 8weet.... Scott, Scott, Scott, Taylor.
Ezra Baker.. .... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
R. H. Alison Taylor, Taylor, Taylot, Taylor.
I. Yandeventer... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.'
J. W. Singleton.. Clay, Clay, Clay, Taylor.
C. Coffin Clay, Clay, Clay, Taylor.
J. B. Herrick... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Missouri.,
T. E. Birch Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Caleb Cox Taylor, ' Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
J. H. Edwards.. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
W. Jewell no vote, no vote, no vote. TayUr.
John Perry ..Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
D. D. Mitchell... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
A. Carr Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Arkantm.
T, W. Newton.. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
T. W. Newton.. Tuylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
T. W. Newton.. Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Michigan.
Saml. Bar-"tow... Scott, Scott, 8cott, Taylor.
C. P. P. Babcock Clay, Clay, Clay, Taylor.
H. M. Comstock.. Clay, Scott, Scott, Mcptu
E. W. Peck Clay, Clay, Scott, Scott.
J. R. Williams... Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott.
Florida.
John Jamison, jr.. Taylor, Taylot, Taylor, Taylor.
L. D. Hart Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
J. Day Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Wisconsin.
0. Cole Taylor, Taylor, Clay, Taylor.
C. J. Hutchinaon. Clay, Clay, Clay, Taylor.
E.D.Murray.... Clay, Clay, Clay, Taylor.
H.E.Eastman... Clay, Clay, Clay, Taylor.
loura.
J. W. Grime*.... Mclean, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Jaa. McManua.... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
A. P. Porter I Clay, Clay, Clay, Taylor.
R. P. Low Taylor, T?ylor, Taylor, Taylor.
Texas.
C.Bullitt 'Taylor, TayloT, Taylor, Taylor.
J. M. Wray... Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
James Ritchie.Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor.
P. Maher Taylor, Taylor, Taplor, Taylor.
RECAPITULATION.
1st ballot. 2d ballot. 3d ballot. 4th ballot
Whole number... 279 279 279 2*0
Neccs. to a choice. 140 140 140 141
Taylor. Ill !)? 133 171 '
Clay 97 96 74 36
ScoU.. 43 49 54 ? 60
Webater 21 *2 10 ' U
Clayton 4 4 1
McLean......... 1
CHEAP WHIU PAPfcK KOH THE TAYLOR
CAMPAIGN.
** Give tmw a little *o*b (.kate Gen. Tugtor.
t* rpHK GRAPESHOT " will be itsoed Iroro the offic- of
X the Courier and Enquirer, * eekly, through tlie Pre
stdentml canvass?commencing on tlie first Satunlay in July
and i ad hie <-n the next Saturday sfter the election In November.
It wil he printed in hand*otne type on fine paper, and upon
? thert of *uper-royal sise?each number containing twenty'
four column* of reading matter, ?
?'THF. GRAPE3HOT" will be devoted to political dona
tion an) intelligence, gH'mg, however, in a condensed hrm,
all the important new* of' the <!?*, both foreign and domestic.
U will slvocate with seal, industry, and all the ability it can
oonnnand the raiwcirui and muh iu?( the Wait.' fabtt
or THE Union ??defined and e*tuMi*hed in the gn at campaign*
of 1*40 and I Hvi under Gen. lUnaiaon and Hmtr Cla*.
In ?fircial object will be to aid the election of ZACHARY
TAYLOR and MILLARD FILLMORE to the high office*
for which they were nominated fay the National Convention of
the WKij party on the *tb of June.
" The Grapeshot" will be mailed to subscriber*, or lent in
package* by expre**, ?*rainboat, railroad, or in any way it may
be ordered, to agent* or clubs for distribution on the followiag
term*, payable in all case* in advance :
Single copie* to one address .. .V) cent* each.
Ten do 45 do
Twenty do 40 do
Fifty do U do
One* hondred ...85 d<)
Orders are requested Immediately from elnbs, sgeatst and
individual* in every part Otthe laited Stale*.
Any paper which will announce the publication ot the " The
Grupewot," eating the term*, thall receive a copy during the
whole campaign.
?' The Gr*p??hot" win be publithed at No. TO Wall street,
and edited by J. WATSON WEBB,
H. J. RAYMOND,
jane W CHARLES KING.
IM CARROLL1 MENIHARY FOR YOUNG
LADIES it now in operation, ou C. between if and
6th *treet*. *
Application* for the *<lmi**?on of boarding and day pa pi It
will be resetted at the inatitution.
Aa omnibus, driven by a aareftil person, nsttl start daily from
the west end ot the shy, in the neigtobMfcMd of the War De
partment, and from snah other remain point* m the city or
from Georgetown as may be desired, to convey pupil* to and
from the institution. may IJ?Stawdlf
M1

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