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Wichita daily eagle. (Wichita, Kan.) 1884-1886, April 28, 1886, Image 3

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045789/1886-04-28/ed-1/seq-3/

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THE WICHITA DAILY EAGLE: WICHITA, KANSAS, WEDNESDAY MORNING, APRIL 28, 1886.
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Address all business letters to
ROLAND P. MUROOCK,
The only Aitoeiaied Prnt Dupatck Fmftr to fas
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
DAILY BT KAIL.
One copy, one year 8 01
One copy, six monlUs 4 00
On copy, three months 2 00
One copy, one month 75
By carrier, per year 10 00
By carrier, three months S SO
Bycarrier, one month 80
Twenty cent per week delivered by carriers In
the City, Fostase prepaid.
WEEKLY.
One copy, rue year. tl SO
One copy, fix months 1 00
TO ADVERTISERS.
Onr rate tor adrertl-Jngr shall be aa low as
tbof 'f any other paper of equal ralne as an
kdvrrtltlnx ineMinm.
AI1 transient aivertlsemenu most be paid
for In advance.
Entered In the postofie at Wichita asseo-on-l-cUes
matter, and entered to tranamltion
through the mail as such.
THE FIOATIXG GARDENS.'
MILES OF FLOWER BEDS IN THE
BLACK, WARM WATERS.
A. Visit to the Wonderful Gardens Near
the City of Mexico A Boat Ride on the
Sluggish Canal The Mystery Bavealed
at Last Fragrance and Color.
Looking down from the foothills of Popo
ratajielt with a field-glass I could see tho
flower gardens of Mexico not far away. But
they were inaccessible from the mountain
side and must be reached from tho city. Won
derful stories had tho old Mexican to tell me
of these flower gardens, tea or a dozen miles
distant, between his cattle ranch and the city,
and I determined to see them as soon as pos
sible. They were floating palms, each a
floating paradise. Yet I had beard all this
before. In London, when I first set foot
ttere, and they found I had been to Mexico,
the inquiry was for the floating flower gar
ions. Ami I was compelled to hang my
head and admit that I had never heard of
them before.
But eren hero in this city I was asked al
most as soon as I arrived by a sharp-nosed
woman, with short hair and a bag over her
shoulder, if I had yet seen Humboldt's float
ing flower gardens. "Sol Well I have; go
ing to write a book about 'cm; wonderful I
magnificent! just too sweet for anything."
I am careful to say that I speak of these
flower gardens as Ilumboldt's floating flower
gardens only because I hare heard others call
them such; not that I have found one line of
Humboldt's on the subject.
Taking with me my old Spanish friend, I
drove out toward the southern gate, to where
the Indians come with thousands of boats
down the broad willow-lined canal with fruit
and flowers and all sorts of things for the city.
This gate is merely a bridge over the green
and stagnant moat or ditch which almost en
tirely surrounds the city, and serves, or once
served, as a wall. Yet there is still the sem
blance of a gate on this south side toward the
flower gardens and Popocatapetl, and high
marble and lava columns lift up on either
side of the little bridge over tho green and
stagnant cano and willow-lined moat On a
marble tablet you read the date 1798; also a
long Spanish inscription which tells you that
this is the south gate of the City of Mexico.
Passing over this little bridge to the south,
with its ancient date and its famed Spanish
inscriptions informing us that it is a gate, we
soon came to the great canal with its thous
and little baits.
A IsOATRIDi: OX THE CANAL.
To begin with, tho boats are ugly and cum
bepome. Sow and then a little canoe with a
single Indian standing erect, with one foot in
ilje bottom and one on the edge, would dart
past us as weslowly worked on up tho sluggish
dark canal, but as a rule the boats are heavy
and slow. They are from ten to twenty-five
feet in length and five, and six feet wide.
There is a low, coarse matting to keep off sun
or rain thrown over some willow loops bent
over tho middle of the lioat; and some of the
boats Iiave lianners and gay awnings, but as
a rule the whole affair on the canal of flower
is a somlier affair from beginning to end. The
canal is older than history, I should say. The
hanks are lined with trees. Under these trees
nre stone seats, set all along by the wide
promenade. Here are many men going up
and down on horselack; but very few car
riages come this way. Thousands of people
go to anil fro with heavy loads.
Boat-loads of flowers! Nothing of the sort
for miles. Yet I ought to explain that the
flowers, as a rule, arrive very early, with
tho dawn almost, so as to bo under the
glass house near the cathedral for early mar
ket. All along the willow and shaded banks of
the broad, deep canal of many leagues in
length, we saw the ever-present and stooping
washerwoman. Find a iwol of water any
n hero you plea.se in Mexico any time, you
will find from one to twenty patient, silent,
modest, and industrious women bending to
their work, their brown Iwbies, in all sorts of
picturesque colors, tumbling on the grass in
groups or sleeping in the shadow close at
hand.
The first boat coming from the mysterious
floating flower land which we encountered
was laden with Indian corn: the second was
loaded with fine wool for a woolen factory,
w hich an English company had established
on the banks of tho flower canaL Then we
met a lot of loud Americans, on their return
from a flower excursion, a short distance up
tho canal; then some Mexican officers, with
their wives and children; but nover a lioat
load of flowers for miles.
Another hour and we were in a wide lake.
All aliout us to right and left and far away
was ono unbroken line of gardens rising from
tho water. But these little gardens, only six
or ten or twenty inches abovo tho water, are
not floating gardens at nil. The boats move
very slowly and cautiously about among
these gardens so as to not make a ripple in the
water, for even a ripple would disturb the
ground.
MYSTERY OF THE "rXOATISO GARDENS."
These gardens are close under the south
wall of tho mountains in the vall-y of Mex
ico. They are not very far from the base of
Popocatapetl and the other snow mountain
with the unpronounceable Indian name, and
called for the better convenience of strangers,
"Tho Lady in AVUitc." But this lake in which
these gardens grow is surely not fed from the
snows of tliese mountains, for the water here
is warm. And it is this warm temperature
of tho water here, rather than the air, which
permits these Indians to take boat-loads of
flowers and vegetables of all kinds into the
city of Mexico in midwinter.
The patient old boatman rowed us carefully
and slowly all through these gardens, as hi
had promised. There arc miles and miles of
these long, narrow, little, black strips, lift
ing up out of the black, warm water of the
lake. Silent Indians, entirely naked, stood
about here and there up to their waists in
water, pulling up weeds or fishing up black,
muddy water at their feet to pour over the
vegetables and flowers. They did not oven
dare, it seemed, to stand upon their flower
beds, so frail and easily disturbed did these
so-called 'floating gardens"' seem to bo estab
lished. There is no such thing as floating gardens
in Mexico. And you can well understand
how impossible, as well as how unnecessary,
it would be for these industrious and sober
minded Indians to set up such things here.
True, the long and fragrant flower beds,
loaded down with flowers, fairly sinking under
the weight of flowers, look as if they were
floating gardens. On either side the rich, red
blossoms dip to the dark waters, and you see
nothing but flowers and flowers and flowers;
the naked and silent red Indians in the black,
still, warm water; tho eternal blue of heaven
overhead; the snow-white mountain's grand
eur, the stillness, the rest, fragrance, the
glory of color everywhere.
Such ore the "floating flower gardens" as I
found them hero after two days' search with
much persistence, only a few leagues from
the City of Mexico.
And I venture to say that no other Ameri
can has been there for a long, long time. It ii
entirely safe to assart that never befoffe hat
on American gone so thoroughly thrcojeb
these gardens.
Stealing One Another's Military Secrets.
There is trouble in Berhn because the latest
pattern of repeat ing-nfles adopted in the Ger
man army has been surreptitiously conveyed
to tho French government The evidence
goes to show that a Saxon officer is the guilty
party, and it will go hard with him if he is
caught This is one of the little difficulties
inseparable from the kind of intrenched camp
busing now being done by the principal na
lions of Europe. Pending a renewal of the
fighting the several governments pilfer one
another's military secrets, inventions, plana
ef fortresses, etc Chicago Tribune.
A Collection or Ssraff-BotUae.
At the recent sale of Mrs. Moras art col
lection and bric-a-brac in New Tctk, a collec
tion of snuff -bottles sold for $4,700. Th per
son who bought them can bow hart, the satis
taction of saeenagia SH OtfhrtB stylsB.
Chicago JoBtBaL
COMICAL STAGE ERRORS.
SOME AMUSING MISHAPS RECALLED
BY A VETERAN MANAGER.
trallla for the Cars Killed la the
Wrong Place A Funny Elephant The
Hotel Clerk's Beply to Fanny Daven
portA Substitute.
Drifting into a general conversation oa
shows and show people, Capt. "BUT Ful
wood, ex treasurer of the opera house, re
lated many amusing incidents, which are
now publishel for the first time. The em
barrassing position in which the veteran,
John Ellsler, father of Efe, was once placed,
formed the opening theme:
"One night several years ago," said Capt
Fulwood, "Uncle John played 'After Dark
in an East Liberty hall to an $S5 house. In
the last act he is supposed to be run over
and killed by a train of cars. At the
proper time Ellsler prostrated himself on
tie stage, awaiting the dread catastrophe,
but the catastrophe did not make its appear
ance, and glancing at the wings. Ellsler saw
to his horror that the train of stage cars
haJ become disabled the exact difficulty I
do not recollect At any rate, the stage
hands were unable to cops with it Then
Ellsler despairingly arose and assisted in
pushing the train in full view of the audi
ence, afterward dying in the most approved
mannor, amidst 'thunders of applause,'
principally from the gallery gods.
"Ed Price (Fanny Davenport's husband)
can appreciate Mr. Ellsler's feeling of dis
gust on that occasion. Ed placed a juven
ile part in Barry Sullivan's company dur
ing a Pittsburg engagement During the
course of the play it was Price's misfortune
to be killed. It was at the close of an act,
and Price fell a corpse directly underneath
the curtain, the ponderous pole falling di
rectly across his body. There was an im
mediate resurrection."
a rexsr scene wrrn rax ELzruAXT.
"Tho most laughable stage error," said
the captain, "that it has been my fortune
to witness, was during a presentation of the
Elephant of Siam. That was twenty-nine
years ago, and the late Joe C Foster was
the manager.
"Foster sent to Girard, Pa., and secured
Dan Rice's trick elephant to play tho lead
ing role. A princo and a princess, with a
dozen of their dependents, are imprisoned
in a castle, and the elephant is utilized in
securing their release. At a signal the ele
phant wobbled on tho stage, and proceeding
to the castle wall, took upon his back tho
princo (Joe Leonard), and the princess (An
nie Eberlee). After conveying them behind
the scenes the beast returned for tho ten
supes, who acted as tho prince's retainers.
Ono by one they climbed over the battle
ments and alighted on tho elephant's back.
Each timo the elephant crouched upon its
forelegs, and dropped tho bewildered "super"
to ths stage. Finally there lay the ten
young men in a heap, apparently unable for
the moment to extricate themselves. The
applause which came from all parts of the
house grow more deafening every moment
A whispered consultation of the supers, and
it was decided to repeat their act, and to
the amusement of the audience, now con
vulsed with laughter, they filed, one by one,
into the castle, and were once more precipi
tated in confusion on the stage. The audi
ence was by this time growing wild, but
was spared a third "daring escape" by the
prompt interference of the exasperated and
disgusteJ stage manager.
A TIPSY HOTEL CLERK'S REMARK.
"A funny remark by a man in the audi
ence once created great merriment at the
Pittsburg opera house, in which everybody
in the lious-', o!f and on tho stage, joined.
Fanny Daicnport and her company were
the attractions. A young hotel clerk, who
had imbibed too much liquor, walked skmly
down the aisle, and ensconced himself in an
orchestra chair in closo proximity to tho
stage. In an adjacent seat he cast his o er
coat and hat, and had just sat down, when
Miss Davenport repeated the lines:
My, lsrd, I can not love you.
"Tho hotel clerk, whoso muddled Lrain in
stantly conceived that the remark was in
tenJei for him, arose to his feet, grasped his
coat and bat. and in a tons loud enough to
b heard all over the house said: 'By ,
that settle! it,' and made his exit Tho
hearty roar of laughter which followed was
joined in by both audience and actors, and
tho gravity of both was seriously disturbed
during the entire performance.
"The effect of liquor on this man recalls a
little incident in the career of liarro Ilutto.
It was tho first presentation of the 'Black
Crook' in this city. Hat to was a member
of the company. Halto staggered into n
t ene a rosebud in the middle of a golden
river and smashed it to pieces, spilling the
little girl occujiant on the stage. Hatto was
immediately discharged, but was roen
gaced the follon ing evening. Hatto mvla
a mu"h better impression on another o -call
on when supporting Forrest in 'Kichelku.'
rte 'walking gent' was taken suudeu'y ill
and Hatto was com elled to play the art
in addition to his own. As tho walking
gent's substitute, Hatto came on the stage
made up' so that tha entire audience recog
nized a rerairkable rcs?mblanco to George
Washington. Tho people were so impressed
that a great stillness settled over tbo house.
Then Hatto became so f righteneJ at his own
success that he hurried olf tbo stags and
took refuge in his dressing room." Pitts
burg Cor. Globe-Democrat
The Ilanjo lias Had Its Day.
The banjo has had its day as a parlor
musical instrument, and the fair bands that
picked the strings so persistently a year ago
hive laid it aside for the more picturesque
an! historic mandolin. This is tho instru
ment to which cavaliers hate sung their
love ditties, and it calls up dreamy imagin
ings of manly figures, cloaked ani lumel,
sinking in tbo dusky shadow under my
lady's lattice, of a red rose dropped through
th: fragrant darkness, or of a gondola float
in; oot moon-lit waters. So th) charm
ing girls fell in love with it at onco when
tho handsome Spanish students brought it
into notice, ani it has teen growing steal-
ily in favor. It gives a pretty accompani
ment for love ba ads, and the imaginative
girl who sings to its thin, sweet notes may
find in its romantic asssociations a danger
ous aid to fee ing in her song. New York
Cor. Chicago Times.
Scene In the Keadlng-Koom.
"You look tire 1, Cbolly." "Yaas." "Been
hard at work, ehr "Vaas." "What at!"
"Aw waw" (yawning1. "Well, I had to
write a letter to maw, don't chew know,
and she will insist on bavin j two pages.
And then I aw waw made a mistake in
the adwess, don't chew know, an J bad to
wiUi it twice. Aw waw augh." Goes to
sleep till dinner time. New York Town
Topics.
A New Variety of Ialon Flower.
John Thorp thinks that the new passion
flower, Constance Elliott, will probably prove
an acquisition. Its color, pure w hit, with
just a suggestion of purple at the base of its
corolla, is in its favor, but its chief advan
tage over the old passiflora coerulia, from
which it springs, is its longer period of bloom.
It flowers when tho vine is much smaller than
the old kind, and consequently much earlier
when planted out, and will continue all tho
latter part of summer up to hard frosts. It
will probably be as hardy as the present
plant, which if cut back and covered will
ordinarily survive our winters. Chicago
Herald.
Montana ludians Darial Ground.
The funniest thing about the Fort Peck In
dians, though, is the manner in which they
bury their dead. They have abandoned the
customs of their fathers in lodging the bodies
in the forks of trees or placing them on scaf
folds, and now dispose of them by boxing
them up as the white men da The boxes are
then placed in a straight line, one after an
other, and piled on top of each other. Each
family has a pile of their own, and for nearly
a mile in a direct line may la seen these burial
boxes. Tourists are, however, recommended
to pass them by on the windward side. Mon
tana Letter.
" Glucoe In the New Testament.
The word "glucose" does not appear in the
English translation of the Scriptures. The
phrase. "It shall be, in thy mouth, sweet as
hon-y," in Kevelation, x: 9, contains in the
original Greek, the txssrcrt approach to the
word "glucose" having a place in the text, as
follows: "Eisthal gluku bos meli." Brook
lyn Eagle.
Coat of Suppressing the Locusts.
The cost of suppressing locusts in Cyprus
since the British occupation amounts to over
VB0,00a. But the government engineer states
that, large as the expenditure has been, it is
certain that it has already been recovered by
the island many times over in the value of
the crops saved. Foreign Letter.
Madagascar's Queen at Sunday-School.
When the queen of Madagascar attends
Sunday -school she passes into the chapel,
where guards, with fixed bayonets, stand ten
deep. Within the chspel, where 1,000 persons
may find seats, the queen sits high up on a
throne oa the side of the pulpit
There are few things in this world worth
getting angry about, and they happen lobe
precisely the things which anger doss mat
hasp- Beery J. Raymond.
TRIP THROUGH SCOTLAND YARD.
Startling Souvenirs of Blosd The
sin's Nest Burglar's Budget.
From Scotland yard is directed the entire
mechanism of the great machine for the pre
vention, repression and discovery of crime.
There, in a low, dingy series of old houses,
are congregated the various bureaus of the
department, tho telegraph and printing offices,
the paymaster's ami surveyor's offices, the
"green yard," where the lost property of the
public is kept until claimed, and the "black
museum," There the articles found on prison
ers ore put aside for them until their release.
In tho "black museum," which was originally
got together by Mr. Harris, a most courteous
and well-informed officer of a literary turn,
ore treasured some startling souvenirs of
blood and murder, which render it more mor
bidly attractive than Tussand's Chamber of
Horrors. A visit to it has much the same ef
fect on the sensitive temperament as the pe
rusal of Edgar Foe's tales in theattio of a sol
itary mansion in the small hours of a winter's
night It puts the nerves out of gear and
leaves a taste in the mouth.
There, in addition to a miscellaneous assort
ment of trumpery, finery, and poor belong
ings, broomsticks, crockery, flatirons, aprons,
sacks, hammers, and fiddles, are pigeon-holed
costly lace, malachite buttons, diamond rings
and chattels of genuine value. In an upper
room, the assassin's nest, ore the ropes with
which men were hanged, remains of the po
tions with which they were poisoned, or the
daggers with which the souls were brutally
dug out of their bodies, si Jo by side with ugly
flint pistols, bludgeons suggestive of Bill
Sykes, and the evil-looking pikes wielded by
Malay pirates who enjoy the grim hospitality
of a quicklime, grave under Newgate's flag
stones. A lady who would insist on entering
the place once was czmedont in a deadly
swoon.
But tho burglars' budget of tools is a re
markable and edifying object of study. They
are beautifully finished, and of the most exquisitely-tempered
steel. A fine trade in the
manufacture of these excellent specimens of
skilled handicraft must be done "su&awbere.
The dark lanterns are ingeniously wrought,
the list slippers delicately embroidered, and
some of the jimmies ore polished until they
resemble oxidized silver. There must be es
thetesof the housebreaker's art How Sir
Claude de Crcspigny, the would-be hangman,
would rejoice were he let loose in this happy
hunting-ground I It sickened me. I had to
ask for air when the curator showed me a
patch of the charred skin of the woman whom
Wainwright had butchered, suspended in a
vial of spirit of wine and neatly docketed.
The coiner's apparatus exhibited a notable
progress in the march of intellect that is, the
intellect which is immortalized in the New
gate calendar. The curator told me the
'criminal classes were acquiring a dangerous
acquaintance w ith chemistry and dynamics,
and that facility of inmanship was on the
increase. Is this the result of school-board
training! It would be melancholy if such an
argument that education is not an unmixed
blessing were to be taken as valid against
its spread. The abuse of a gift is no reason
that its dissemination should be hampered.
Thomas a Gill, M. P.
A Hill Passed for "Flous Frank."
Among tbo bills before the house commit
tee on military affairs recently was one pro
viding for the removal of the charge of deser
tion against one Frank Thompson, who it was
said had enlisted in 19C2 in company F, Sec
ond Michigan volunteers. The person in
question, it is said, is none other than a
woman, who is at present a resident of Colo
rado, known as Mrs. Sarah E. Seely. She
entered the military service in Michigan when
she was 19 years of age, attired as a male,
under tho name of Frank Thompson. From
the fact that she did not indulge in the use of
toliacco, play cards, or any other of the so
called camp vices, she was dubbed ''Pious
Frank," and always went by that name.
Other than this reserve there was no reason
for suspecting her sex. She went through
two liattles, and did as good service as any of
her comrades.
She was detailed at brigade headquarters
as on orderly, and ono of tbo members of the
committee, who served in the same command,
says that he saw "Frank" carrying brigado
orders in the thickest of the battle at Peters
burg. Her reputation and character were
never brought in question. After thus serv
ing two years she was taken sick and ordered
to the hospital, where there was also a num
ber of her company comrades. It now be
came apparent to her that if she remained in
tho hospital she could no longer conceal her
sex, and rather than have this exposure made
she quietly walked off and left the service.
She proceeded to Oberiin, Ohio, and entered
college, w here she was educated. She is the
author of tho book "Nurse and Spy." At
present slio is a resident of Colorado, a
worthy wife and tho mother of three children.
The committee unanimously recommended
the passage of the bilk Cincinnati Enquirer.
Meteorology of the Congo Country.
Mr. A. von Danckelmann, a German mete
orologist, has lieen making observations at
Vivi, in the country of the Congo, and re
ports some curious results. During about a
j ear that ho stayed there the barometrical
column did not vary more than ten milli
meters; even the passage of tornadoes seemed
to pro-luce no greater effect' uxm it The
i ear is divided into rainy and dry seasons.
During the latter, from May to October, no
rain falls, but the earth is occasionally moist
ened by the depositions from fogs. From
November to April heavy showers of short
duration preval, and the water falls, in tor
tious, sometimes as high as 1(12 millimeters
alxnit four inches in two hours.
Long, fine rains are unknown. The country
is isited by cyclones, but, while storms floss
ing to the north of the station turned the vane
in a contrary direction to that of the hands
of a w atclt, those passing it to the south
turned it in a direction corresinding with
them. The natives bum the loll prairie-
grass in the dry seasons, causing fires that
last for a long time, and produce considerable
meteorological effects. The air is constantly
loaded w ith smoke, while cumulus clouds are
formed over the fires and emit lightning with
thunder. One of the most remarkable mete
orological phenomena of the region is the ex
istence of n southwest wind, which, begining
at sunset, blows all night till sunriso with
such force as to raise large and dangerous
waves on the river. Phrenological Journal.
TEARING DOWN A MOUNTAIN.
Tho Proudest Achievement of the Paav
ama A Contractor's Huge Task.
Buhio Soldado is the proudest achievement
of the Panama Canal company, and is, in
deed, a great work. The hill is of solid rock,
alternating at places in huge cobble bowlders.
Wo are saluted with a following volley of 200
gun-cotton explosions to show how rapidly
such work can be manipulated. On the
smoke clearing off a really grand engineering
feat meats tho eye. Ledge upon ledge of
sloping rock terrace tower up to the highest
point, about 2s) feet On several of the
ledges stand rows of wagons, which were it
not a holiday would be busily at work. V.'o
are at the bottom, and it is necessary to as
cend, which we contrive by means of winding
paths, M. De Lesseps on a sure-looteu mute,
for the heat is intense.
The contractor for tha raising of this large
mass is a Swiss of the namo of Sondcrcggcr,
whose face is a sanguine and cheerful picture,
as if tho impediments were nothing. Con
trary to tho policy of many of his colleagues,
he is open and straightforward. The contract
has been for tho removal of a Utile short of
2,XW,W0 cubic meters, he says, as if enjoying
the idea; 1,'JU0,UX) of this has been done and
only KO.000 only remains. The rocky sec
tion is StO meters long, about eighty feet
brood at the bottom, sloping up to alout 130
feet at the top, and the contractor f urther
tai.es the swarthy ground as far as kilometer
thirty-three. Mr. Sonderegger answered roe
plainly that be had no doubt of completing
his task by the end of next year.
His mole of excavating is very ingenious.
He first pierced a tunnel right through the
nyr"t'" leading to the flat ground on either I
side. Above this tunnel large boles about
three meters broad are made, four in all, at
various points above the tunnel, the top being
made funnel-shaped. The rocks are then
blasted and rolled into these apertures, whose
standing sides embrace a large circuit Be
low a train of wagons is in waiting to receive
the huge bowlders as they dash through. In
tliist wv four trafSc cars are filled at once.
and in a very short tame the whole train
moves away with its heavy load. Sach is '
the practical and swift moans which this en
terprising contractor takes to diminish his
huge task. No wonder the company are
proud of him; and were there many of his
practical nature, who could show such good
solid work, the canal would gain many
friends. Panama Cor. Chicago limes. j
A Thrust at Manual TilsOnsj-Scheola. J
There is a gimlet and corkscrew concepcioa J
of school education abroad that would make '
its fundamental purpose the production of
human automata that, upon having their
numerous strings pulled by aa overseer, a
bass-workman or a director of some kind,
would file, turn, rasp, polish and finish me
chanical products of various kinds.
None of this is education; it b the system of
apprenticeship applied to school armcatirsi.
No such cooosption can be at the bottom of
tats school edncaiioa. These antrsnata are
far more likely to be bad titiawi than good
onus. Professor a a ftw Lndias School
Jfarmal
For Bargains in
Boots & Shoes,
GO TO
C. E. LEWIS & CO,
HO 3A.I3r STP-EET, -A.T ''H H
Red FrontBoot &ShoeStore
Where One Price, Cash on Delivery, and Goods marked
in Plain Figures is the way they do business.
C E. LEWIS & CO-
NEW DET GOODS
AT RETAIL
10to30percent
Less than Regular Prices.
In order to retire from business, I offer tit
Retail my large, wholesale stock of
Fancy and Staple
DRY GOODS,
Gents1 Furnishing Goods,
Notions, Etc.,
Embracing new styles for Spring and Sum
mer wear. Or will trade same for city
property, or good farming lands.
" Purchflbers generally will find it to their
interest to examine my
JNO.
April 15, 1886.
1870.
Headquarters for Money!
LITTLE'S LOAN OFFICE.
EAGLE BLOCK,
LOANS ON CHOICE CITY
nsro DELAYS-
ASHBEL WELCH,
LOAN
HEAL ESTATE
FARM LOANS. CHATTEL LOANS.
BEST BATES AND PROMPT ATTENTION.
X)0 osroa? :f ' xx, to ca-TiI, jhtjd see :m::e.
Office in Eagle Block, -
D.W.McCALLA.
McOALLA & MILLER,
Brokers in REAL ESTATE,
Do a General Business in City, Farm, Frontier a"d Foreign Properties.
Sales effected, exckanccf made. Additions handled, Capital placed upon advantageous
term?, and l.oans negotiated oti all apprcud Ileal .Mitc Mcurltici.
A large list of varied properties constantly carried on our books, and all clas.es of cufi
tomcrscan be accomodated. Special attention git en to the llargains it. tbe market.
Conveyance at all times ready and free
KOOM 4 OVEK HYDE'S JSOOK STOKE,
BANKRUPT.
POST, the Pawnbroker,
Has Just Bought
$3,000 Worth of Diamonds
For $1800. They are going to be sold at
BARGAINS,
At his Store, 428 Douglas Ave, Wichita, Kan.
The Oldest and Largest House in the (StyjNowisthetimett
Aidrich
Wholesale and
Surgical Instruments. Drupgiete' Sundries, Fancy Good, Etc.
In our Prescription Departmemt None but the Purest
Drugs, Finest Chemicals and Moet Experi
enced Clerks are Employed.
.Orders by Mail Solicited.
Nos. 138 and 140 Main Street
i
B. LOMBARD. Jr., Preft, JAMES L.LOMBARP; Vice-Prte't '
Lombard Mortgage Co.'
In Kansas State
Money on hand. No delay when secu
rity and title is good.
BATES AS LOW AS THE LOWEST.
Call and
GEO. E.
stock.
G. ALLEN.
139 MAIN STREET.
1.886
PROPERTY A SPECIALTY.
& INSURANCE
WICHITA, KANSAS.
S.S.MU.LEH.
to customers.. Correspondence solicited.
114 JIAIN STKEET, WICHITA, KAN.
& .brown, i
Retail TSgists.inu'Tu
Dealers in i
Wichita Kans?s
Bank Building.
See Us &ft
SPALTON. Secretary.
27th WEEK'S ENQAGMENET.
$500.00
WILL BE FORFEITED
To the School fund of
"Conn's Girl" Is not
Clgr.
The ' 'Conn's Girl' '
by any dgar In tha market for the same money
and few ten cent dears are It superior.
Smokers will serve their Interest by remem
bering that th same nickel they invest In an
Inferior dgar would buy the "Conn's Girl,
which Insures them the Tery most they ran get
for their money. Th steadily Increasing? sale
of this cl irar prov it to b th most successful S
cent dgar ever Introduced to Kansas smokers.
Sold by all retailers.
wuouhxlb bt
b . o o mr,
JOBBER OF CIGARS,
WICHITA. KANSAS.
A fresh supply of "lotnc's Uiu.' always kept In stock. Send your trial order for 1000 "Ulrts."
Satisfaction guaranteed or no sale, and receive gratis halt gross advertising Swedish
Flamlns Matchea.
Money
OIsT
City Property, Chattel Mortgages,
AND PERSONAL SECURITY.
LOWEST RATES. 3STO DELAYS.
L B. BUNNELL & CO.
B. D. ALLEN ,
Xotaht rrauc.
ALLEN & GRAHAM,
Succeesorslto Wichita Land and Loan Co
NEGOTIATE LOANS,
Sells Land Places Insuranco Make Collections. Taxes Paid for Non
Residmits. Correspondence Solicited.
Room 1 Over Israel's Druj Store.
DOUGLAS AVENUE, WICHITA, KA8.
S. D. PALLETT,
--Dealer iu
NOKTHERNAND SOTJTBEKN PIKE LUMBEI
Lath, Shingles. Sash, Doors & Blinds.
25" O0ic. find Wnitc Pine Vnrd
Fine Yard wron the ttreet
E3TA liTSIHrEID X662
la tbe place to get everything kept in a Firut-Clafle Bakery.
ECKARDT & SCOTT, Prop's. 144 Main Street.
--F. W. SWAB1--
fSUCCESSOU TO F. STAUtUAN.)
Kccpa ou baud fiuc goodn'of tbo
city. Satisfaction guaranteed. No
l.tr
J. M. ALLEN & CO.
(SsUCCEPSOKfe TO
Wholesale and Retail
GEOCEES
caskets. :rojb:es. axovKS. cha.x:, etc
Have two line heare. A private telephone rtlreet to Wichita Cemetery- Oflee always OTe
9!i Doojtla Avenoe. Wichita Kansas, tr frtmrt mttnlia It Orn TtUfrf .
W. a. COKJtKTT. rrrs II. H. RICHARDS Tie Prea. J. U. BLACK, S. and Tri
a. itEss. s.r.JOimao.
WICHITA
WHOLESALE GROCER CO
Jobbers ol Groceries and Grocers Fixtures,
SHOW OASES. SC-AJLiE, ETC..
NOS. 233 & 235 NORTH MAIN STREET, WICHITA, KAN.
Zimnierlv's Addition.:
one mile south on Lawrence ave.
s" . U J? 1 m m
at 611 South
Wichita City
K3TABL.JSHKII 1T4.
MANUFACTURE THE
IMPERIAL, -
J JITf fJJ8C "
4. faa t " "
:BSBs
ttmti uusoei
a. w
n EUSMT a
J. a. EOIXTDAT. c- WOfcCR.
J. R. HOLLIDAY & CO,
WICHITA GROCERY,
sotMAJOEHQtXJDArtirfa y Q glfTTH a. 8ON8. Wichita.
STAPLE & FANCY GROCJERIES.j.SSSS'S-.
No. 227 East Deuci
tbe SUte or Eaasu If
a Genuine Hraa rtlleJ
Is not equalled In qaallty
to Loan
O. W. GRAHAM,
tout end of Pouglai wenve TtUwe
1-if
latest style. Tbe largest stock In tlir
trouble to show poods. Call and sec m
UrM Door North of louctr Boll 11
Al.l.KN .V TUCKKH.)
H. W. KENDLE,
And Dealer in
WOM, CLOTH, AND IETALLIC BCEUL CASES
ls- mIv r -h ftt j"1 V X4 rwtTV
Market Street.
Roller Mills!
I.XCOErOEATrn 1U
CELEBRATED BRANDS:
- - (Holler Patent.
". ?trrRHS?
-wj.
W VV ul - - . mm & &sl ka
- 7c vf u to tT W. w
W.
OLIVfcK 4 IMBUUtN JU
Awm. WICHITA, KAN. .
-eagle;
Town-Site
U:
.&.T
. D& -'
WICHITA, KAN,
Have for aale. on line of WICHITA & COLORADO RAILROAD
north-west of Wichita, town lota at new towns of
MAIZE, 9 Miles
COLWICH, 14
it
ANDALE, 20 "
MTHOPE, 27
Traineare now running ree'ilirly on Railroad from- Wichita to
Mount Hope.
These towns arc in the best portion of
Sedgwick County, Kansas.
Mapa of Towna and Pries can b bad aa bwrvisafW aat forth :
At Wichita, call on N. P. NiedarLandar or Koa Harria,
At Malm, call on H. F. Rhodaa;
THE "EAOLE CO." HAVE
JuncfionTown Company" Addition
to Wichtia.
Tbia Addition la at J unction of
..V.If.ll.wxiArMnM U
daatrabla lota. 8tratcaxa will
Additkm witk tfca aaat aida of tfca
Prioa Iiat of tkia Addition
Company!
from WICHITA.
WICHITA.
WICHITA
it
At Colwlch. call oa Oao. W. Steaarod;
At An Dal, call on J. W. Dal.
Dal lota.
ALBO FOR 8AIJB LOTB IN
Ft. Boott asd W.4C
4
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ba is eartioa, eoftoaetJar Isato
rivar ia IBM.
by anTltaaT oau
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